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Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

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Sat - 27.12.2014


Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

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sfnblog.org Shaping the Future of the News Publishing

By now you’ll have heard an awful lot about native advertising. Like the fact that it will save us all (maybe), that news companies see a financial future in it, and that it while it sure can attract a whole lotta love, alas, the time has not come for The New York Times to embrace it.

A quick recap: native advertising is independently compelling content (text, video or other) that is paid for by a brand, and semi-camouflaged in a publication’s natural editorial environment. It should neither stick out like a sore thumb nor dupe the reader, somewhat like how the model in the picture above blends prettily into her bed of leaves, without leading anyone to believe that she herself is plant-based.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-16 17:48

Lekiosk, the French virtual newsstand app that lets readers subscribe to several magazines for a flat rate, has just been refuelled, and is ready to grow. The company is moving forward with €5.6 million in second-round funding, PaidContent has reported— an investment that will serve “to fuel growth and global expansion and to invest in product development,” according to co-founder Michael Philippe.

We last wrote about the startup in June, when it launched an English version for the UK market. There, Lekiosk partnered right off the bat with publishers such as IPC Media and Condé Nast, offering British users its characteristic bundle of ten magazine subscriptions at the price of £9.99 per month (in France it is ten for €10). Philippe told us at the time that they were off to “a very good start.” He said that they were preparing for further international expansion, with plans to conquer Italy by the fall, and additional European countries in 2013.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-14 16:45

When aggregation/news-reading apps are first launched, their founders tend to emit a hazily rose-tinted view of future revenue prospects. Flush with venture capital, a fledgling startup’s first priority is not to decide whether a lucrative future lies with a freemium model, paid subscriptions, and/or targeted advertising; its initial goal is to provide the best possible service and to build an “audience of significant scale”– the rest will (hopefully) fall into place. This is no longer the case for Flipboard and Pulse, two major apps in this category, which have each been around for over two years and have attracted 20 million users respectively. No longer hatchlings, these companies are entering the phase of concretizing their revenue plans, and the strategies they have selected are sharply divergent.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-12 18:29

A Streetcar Named WiredThe Real Inspector Horse & Hound? In San Francisco, periodicals are leaping off the page and onto the stage with Pop-Up Magazine. Last night at Davies Symphony Hall, the 7th "issue" was performed before a privileged and proactive audience— the 2,740 available tickets sold out in around half an hour.

The men and women on stage were not actors, or even “well-known literary performers,” but the architecture critic for the Los Angeles Times, a technology writer for the San Francisco Chronicle, an illustrator whose work has appeared in The New York Times, an international correspondent for Vanity Fair, and… you get the point.

Pop-Up Magazine is journalism, performed. In each issue, contributors who have made careers out of writing, producing radio, taking photographs, or making documentary films present “short moments of unseen, unheard work” before a live audience.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-09 16:31

A £1bn sale of the Financial Times is under active consideration, Bloomberg said today  – only for the story to be immediately denied by its owner. 

Pearson, the FTSE 100 media group, issued a statement in response to the article saying that, though ‘not in the habit of responding to rumours, speculation or reports about our portfolio’, it was obliged to point out that ‘this particular Bloomberg story is wrong.’ Dame Majorie Scardino, the outgoing chief executive of Pearson, once said famously that the FT would be sold ‘over my dead body’ but her impending departure from the company in January lends added credence to the report, as does the fact that the story comes just weeks after Pearson agreed to merge Penguin with Bertelsmann’s Random House in a deal to create the largest book publisher in the US and the UK. 

For the rest of this story, please see our sister publication, www.editorsweblog.org.

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-11-08 10:13

Britain’s Telegraph Media Group (TMG), publisher of The Daily Telegraph and The Sunday Telegraph, has instated a metered digital subscription model for international visitors to its website and users of its apps. The new system, modeled on that put in place by The New York Times last March, lets readers from outside the UK view 20 free articles per month before they hit the wall. Here’s what we know so far:

Who: Readers situated in Britain, you may breathe a sigh of relief— TMG claims that it has no plans thus far to charge you for content. The new modus operandi affects only far-flung Telegraphites.

The Telegraph is the most widely read quality daily national newspaper in the UK, according to the latest National Readership Survey, with 9.23 million readers across print and online platforms.

What: International readers who have exceeded their 20 article quota are offered two options.

1) The £1.99 ($3.20) /month “Telegraph Web and Mobile Pack,” including unlimited website and mobile app access, or

2) The £9.99 ($16) /month “Digital Pack,” offering the same plus iPad access to the Daily and Sunday Telegraph.

Readers will be given a month-long free trial before having to commit to either plan.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-02 16:26

Digital subscribers are accounting for an ever-more-generous slice of American newspapers’ circulation pumpkin this Halloween, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulation (ABC)’s latest biannual study of 613 daily newspapers and 528 Sunday titles.

Overall, daily circulation has remained flat in the six months ending September 30, dropping by a mere 0.2 percent compared to the same period last year. But behind this placid mask, digital circulation— encompassing paid and restricted-access websites, mobile apps, PDF replicas and e-reader editions— rose as a proportion of total circulation by over 5 percent. It now accounts for an average of 15.3 percent of newspapers’ total circulation, up from 9.8 percent a year ago.

Leading the digital pack is The New York Times, with a circulation of over 896,000 across its digital platforms (with the data measurement caveat that one user accessing NYT content from multiple digital platforms may be counted more than once). Over half of subscriptions to The Times are now for digital editions.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-31 17:30

It has now been said repeatedly that India – together with Brazil – is a booming market for newspapers. Factors include economic growth, urbanization, an expanding middle class and rising literacy rates, as a recent report by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism has said. As much has been written recently on the Indian news media, last month Professor George Brock, Head of Journalism at City University, collected the links in one place.

During catastrophes, reliable data is an essential part of news coverage. The Guardian Datablog mapped every verified event when Hurricane Sandy hit the US East Coast.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-10-30 18:58

After the high-profile merger of publishing giants Penguin and Random House comes a development in regional news with a significance that belies its parochial implications. Former Mirror Group chief executive David Montgomery is reportedly involved in talks to consolidate the local news assets of Northcliffe Media (regionals arm of the Daily Mail & General Trust), Trinity Mirror and Iliffe News and Media (parent company Yattendon Group) within his own venture, Local World, which he would lead, and of which he would be a part stake-holder. Such a scheme would not only provide evidently beneficial economies of scale, but would combine the number one, four and eleven publishers in UK regional news in an industry that is barely keeping its head above water.

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-10-30 17:50

It’s official: Penguin and Random House are betrothed, their parent companies Pearson and Bertelsmann announced today.

As is often the case with arranged marriages, it is hoped that this union will allow the two houses to consolidate their power: together, the book publishers are expected to control over one quarter of the U.S. and British markets, and to generate approximately £2.5 billion (or $4 billion) in annual revenue.

And as with so many weddings these days, theirs is “subject to regulatory approval;” if all goes well, they will likely tie the knot in the latter half of 2013.

The idea of huddling together was no doubt influenced by the increasing need for publishers to puff out their chests against retailing giant Amazon, which has cornered 90 percent of the UK ebook market, and nearly 40 percent of the market for all books, according to Quartz.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-29 18:24

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