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Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

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Thu - 27.11.2014


Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

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sfnblog.org Shaping the Future of the News Publishing

In the UK, the Daily Mail's website, MailOnline, has passed the 100 million unique browser mark for the first time, according to new figures released by ABC and reported by Press Gazette. The site recorded a record 105,720,020 in August 2012, which represents a 41.1 percent increase over August 2011.

Journal Register Company, which recently filed for bankruptcy, is likely to reduce print frequency at some of its 20 US daily newspapers, writes Rick Edmonds on Poynter's website.

The Guardian's Roy Greenslade reports that the number of signers to a petition "urging Sun editor Dominic Mohan to stop publishing page 3 girl pictures," has now nearly doubled in just the past couple of days to more than 23,000.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-20 17:28

America’s highest-net-worth individuals have once again been ranked by bank account in the latest Forbes 400 list, and along with the paucity of exceptionally wealthy women, one of the most startling revelations is the speed at which last year’s social media chiefs have slid down the totem pole.

Together, social media’s young masters lost US$ 11 billion in a single year, raising doubts about whether wealth generated in the hype-splashed sector has staying power.

The fortune of Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg slipped the furthest. In just over three months after the social network’s widely publicized IPO “pop” in May, the company’s market value has dropped by over $50 billion dollars. Its 28-year-old founder’s net worth has dwindled by $8.1 billion to hit $9.4 billion, and his Forbes placement has fallen from 14th to 36th. In his new status, Zuckerberg is tied with another man who had a rough summer in the headlines: 81-year old Rupert Murdoch.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-20 16:51

Times are tough down under. Embattled traditional media outlets in Australia are being beaten in the struggle for advertising revenue by online media companies.

Where once classified advertisements were rivers of revenue that sustained print titles for almost two centuries, they are now more commonly found at specialist sites that are presenting a serious challenge to newspaper’s position in the advertising market.

According to the Commercial Economic Advisory Service of Australia, 2012 is the first year in which online ad spend in Australia overtook that of newspapers. The dominance of new media companies focused on the sale of classified ads online, in particular Carsales.com, recruitment site SEEK, and real-estate site REA, contributed greatly to the change, which saw the online market receive 27 per cent of the country’s total advertising dollars. Newspapers attracted 24 per cent.

Reuters reports that the shift in advertising dominance from traditional media to online companies is a relatively new phenomenon in Australia. As recently as April the value of traditional media organisations was greater than that of online companies, but in the intervening months the worth of newspaper outlets and television broadcasters plummeted.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-20 16:32

When journalist and television presenter Luca Telese acrimoniously parted ways with Il Fatto Quotidiano at the beginning of summer, he promised to create a rival newspaper “to say what many on the left think but few say”. Now, a mere three months later, that is exactly what he has done, assembling a thirty person editorial staff, replete with former Fatto journalists (seven in total), contributors from some of Italy’s most renowned national titles, and interns.

Pubblico hit Italian newsstands on Tuesday 18th September, and on first sight it would be easy to mistake it for another newspaper entirely. The graphics and logo are clearly borrowed from Libération, France’s leading left-wing paper, while the slogan “Not funded by public money” bears more than a passing resemblance to a similar declaration found on Il Fatto’s front page. The paper will be published seven days a week, in every region of Italy barring Sicily and the southern part of Calabria. Though some commentators believe the newspaper’s content might be better suited to a weekly publication, the paper is no doubt hoping that it will be in a better position to attract and maintain a loyal readership by establishing a daily reading habit amongst consumers.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-19 17:56

The Guardian has announced that Tanya Cordrey has been named to the new role of Chief Digital Officer. She is currently GNM's Director of Digital Development. In the same announcement, the company said David Pemsel, GNM's interim Chief Marketing Officer, has been promoted to the new position of Chief Commercial Officer.

The Huffington Post reports that Se & Hoer, a Danish celebrity weekly magazine, will publish the topless photos of the Duchess of Cambridge in a 16-page supplement that is sold with its Thursday edition.

Speaking of Huffington Post, an article on Mashable describes what a smash hit HuffPost Live has been in its first month on the air. To date, "HuffPost Live has aired 12 hours of original video per day, five days a week, with more than 2,000 guests appearing on air," according to the Mashable report.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-19 17:12

BBC's new director general vows to re-invent content, not just re-purpose it, says paidContent, while the Guardian reports on George Entwistle's plans for a "radical" shape-up at the BBC.

The editor of the Irish Daily Star has been suspended following the paper's publication of the topless duchess photos, according to Press Gazette.

While back in France where the pictures were originally published, Closer is now being sued by Dominique Strauss Kahn, says LePoint.fr.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-18 18:41

At the beginning of this week, The Guardian published its 12th annual list of the 100 most powerful people in the media industry. Covering broadcast media, newspapers and magazines, new media, marketing, advertising and PR, the Guardian Media 100 is compiled by a panel of industry insiders who take into account the economic, cultural and political influence individual media figures exert in the UK.

Unsurprisingly, given the size of their audiences and revenues, social media and technology companies dominate the top 10. Google CEO Larry Page takes pole position, reflecting his company’s attempts to move into the social networking market with Google+. Twitter’s Dick Costolo takes second place, while both Sir Jonathan Ive for Apple and Android/ Google’s Andy Rubin (third and sixth place respectively) are feted for the role they played in developing tablet products and changing the way we access information online.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-17 17:48

In a post titled "A quick note on innovation in media" on his blog, Adam Westbrook offers this advice: "The first thing to realise is that the secret is not to come up with a new idea. There is rarely such a thing. Instead, the secret is to look at a space with people, or businesses already established, and see what they’re doing wrong. Then invent something that improves on what they do."

Mario García takes a look at USA Today's new website, which he notes "combines clever design with new ideas for advertising and marketing."

In India, "HT Media's business daily, Mint has completely revamped its website (www.livemint.com) and launched an integrated newsroom that caters to print and digital platforms," reports Biprorshee Das on the afaqs! website.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-17 17:18

About half of the Chicago Tribune's local editions have been cut since the company suspended its work with Journatic, a supplier of outsourced journalism, according to a report on Poynter by Andrew Beaujon.

"If Africa wants to be taken seriously, it must generate its own content," was a theme of a panel discussion on "Broadband Africa - Opportunities for Innovation and Transformation," part of Africa Rising: The Highway Africa Conference 2012 in Association with the Global Forum for Media Development, which took place this week in Grahamstown, South Africa. While there is a lot of connectivity within Africa, there is not a lot of content being created there, one panel member noted.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-14 17:43

In a business climate of plummeting advertising and circulation revenue that has seen editorial budgets slashed, newsroom functions outsourced, legacy obligations become an ever increasing burden and print days reduced, you might be forgiven for thinking that the future of newspapers was cause for concern for editors and owners.

However, a survey conducted by the Missouri School of Journalism’s Reynolds Journalism Institute (RJI) has revealed remarkable levels of optimism in the newsrooms of U.S. daily newspapers – and significant faith in the power of print.

The RJI held telephone interviews with 485 news publishers and senior newspaper executives, who together represent one-third of the daily news titles in the U.S., as part of its annual Publishers Confidence Index. Full details of the report’s findings on the state of print and digital revenues, online news and mobile devices will be released in the coming months but a statement released by the RJI on 13 September attests to the ongoing importance of print publications in an industry widely thought to be preparing for a digital future.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-14 14:40

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