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Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

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Wed - 01.10.2014


Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

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sfnblog.org Shaping the Future of the News Publishing

From the Apple team that brought us smartphones that changed everything – again - comes the iPhone 5: the phone that changed very little. For the first time.

'Evolution not revolution’ is the phrase several commentators are turning to when summing up Apple’s newest release. Lighter, thinner and faster than its predecessors, the iPhone 5 nonetheless lacks the ‘wow’ factor we have come to expect from its makers. Hardly surprising really, given that it is the sixth incarnation of Apple’s ground-breaking smartphone.

Publishers and reporters hoping that with the new iPhone Apple would provide tools and technology that could once again change to face of journalism are likely to be disappointed. Certain features will endear the new handset to journalists who use, or want to use, their smartphones for on-the-ground reporting and information gathering. However in terms of its being used as a reporting gadget, there is little that sets the new model apart from its previous incarnation.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-13 17:30

Do newspapers speak to your condition? If so, you might be interested in a print edition of the Lancashire Evening Post that plays audio. Developed as part of a research project by the University of Central Lancashire, "Interactive Newsprint" will be demostrated at the London Design Festival next week, Journalism.co.uk’s Sarah Marshall reports

“A new study has suggested that the most read newspaper in the UK - the Sun - is also the least trusted,” writes Andrew Pugh for Press Gazette. In the least read and most trusted category? The Independent, the Guardian, and the Financial Times.

Press Gazette also reports that Archant has launched a new 68-page glossy magazine called Fulham Resident that is being distributed to 13,500 homes.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-13 17:30

“Starting a print newspaper in an emerging market can be profitable,” said William Pike, CEO of Kenya’s The Star . It is a lot of hard work, he said, but from its foundations in 2007, The Star is now the third paper in the Kenyan market and has made a small profit.

Many say that as mobile adoption rises in Africa, it will threaten print, as online has in many other countries, but Pike thinks this view should be seen with a critical eye. He was speaking at the 19th World Editors Forum in Kiev last week.

“We believe that there is still a great market in print,” he continued, with just one paper published per 140 people in the country (in comparison to one per two in markets where readership is highest.) Young people still want to read newspapers, and he highlighted research that showed that more 18-34 year olds read newspapers than go on the internet, or listen to CDs. TV and radio still provide a larger threat than digital.

The Star is a subsidiary of Radio Africa, which operates both Kiss FM and Classic FM in Kenya. Its aim is to be low-cost but high-quality. It breaks big, hard-hitting stories that have an impact on the community, and Pike cited this as an essential quality for success for a new paper. It is also important to be analytical with good op-eds, he said.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-13 17:01

A petition on Change.org has asked Sun editor Dominic Mahon to put an end to showing topless women on page three, reports Roy Greenslade in the Guardian.  

Social blogging platform Tumblr is under pressure from investors to find a business model, says Business Insider.

User-generated photo app Scoopshot (which just published a study it commissioned among WAN-IFRA members) tells Journalism.co.uk how it approaches verification.

The Knight Foundation's Eric Newton describes on Nieman Lab's website the changes he believes journalism schools must adopt. "Without better-equipped graduates, how can we be sure future generations will have the news and information they need to run their communities and their lives?" he asks.

The Times-Picayune has suffered backlash from readers angry at reduced print days, and local advertisers are split over whether print or internet ads are more effective, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-12 18:34

Statistics released on Wednesday morning by the National Readership Survey have given many quality news titles in Britain reason to be cheerful. Healthy online audiences are proof that falling print circulation at “broadsheet” publications is a result of reader migration to digital editions, not a lack of interest in the news product itself.

For the first time ever, the NRS has taken into account both online and print audiences in its evaluation of readership numbers for British newspapers and magazines. The results produced by the NRS differ to some extent from those posted by the Audit Bureau of Circulations; the ABC’s data is based on the sales and traffic figures provided by individual publications, while the NRS instead uses statistics collected from a joint Nielsen and UKOM survey of 3,500 people.  

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-12 15:11

The Wall Street Journal’s Deputy Managing Editor, Alan Murray, speaks to Forbes contributor Steven Rosenbaum about tracking the startling growth of WSJ’s live video presence, which reached 28 million streams in August.

Israeli newspaper Maariv "told its more than 2,000 staff on Monday that most of them will be fired by October and that the paper does not have the money to cover the severance pay they have coming if the paper closes, employees said.” Haaretzreports.

Columbia University’s Emily Bell argues that it's time to embrace the growing influence of real-time data on the media business.

The Observer, the Sunday title of UK newspaper The Guardian, is increasing its cover price by 30p starting this week, The Guardian reports.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-11 18:46

After running in stealth mode for the past five months as ‘Planet Daily’, the digital video news service ‘NowThisNews’ was officially unveiled on Monday. Using Twitter and Facebook to spread the word about its beta site, NowThisNews will air its first videos in mid-October.

As its mantra “Social. Mobile. Digital” would suggest, the site is set to deliver digital news content direct to consumers’ mobile devices via social media sites. In a press release the NowThisNews team declared their intention to “meet straight on the inevitable and rapid changes happening in news consumption.”

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-11 15:50

At Poynter, fresh doubt is cast over digital first’s ability to support news organisations by compensating for print advertising losses. Statistics released last week by the Newspaper Association of America (NAA) “show $798 million in print losses for the first half of 2012 compared to the same period a year ago. That is only slightly offset by a $32 million gain in digital. The ratio of losses to gains is 25 to 1”, writes Rick Edmonds.

The same NAA statistics revealing falling print ad revenue has prompted industry observer Frédéric Filloux to re-issue his calls for higher newspaper prices. The appeal reflects the reality “that the print product is still the primary source of revenue as newspapers migrate to the Web”, reports Ian Tennant for the Knight Centre for Journalism in the Americas.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-10 17:47

A debate has been ignited over the issue of journalism grants and funding.

At the same time that The L.A Times and The Washington Post have received financial support from the Ford Foundation ($1 million and $500,000 respectively), the independently run journalism start-up Homicide Watch was forced to raise funds via a Kickstarter campaign.

The assistance offered to established, for-profit news organisations and the neglect of pioneering journalism projects has raised questions about the kind of support innovative entrepreneurs can expect from institutions interested in protecting the future of quality reporting.

Founded and edited by former crime reporter Laura Amico, Homicide Watch provides in-depth information and reporting on murders committed in the Washington D.C area. With the help of a database designed by Amico’s husband Chris, for the past two years the site has sought to abide by its promise to “Mark every death. Remember every victim. Follow every case.” In doing so, Homicide Watch has attracted a large following in the D.C community and beyond: since its debut in 2010 visits to the site have escalated, rising from 500 a month to reach 300,000 in July of this year.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-10 16:10

Brian Boyer, the Head of NPR's news apps team, offers advice on “making useful things for people,” in a post on Nieman Lab's website titled "Welcome to Hacker Journalism 101, take your seats."

Covering the US political conventions costs media organisations dearly, but The Washington Post's Paul Farhi writes that it is also essential in terms of credibility.

News International could face 230 new claims relating to alleged phone hacking, according to a report on the Guardian's website.

On PoynterHerbert Lowe offers seven tips for writing "a Twitter bio that’ll make you stand out as a journalist"

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-07 18:31

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