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Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

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sfnblog.org Shaping the Future of the News Publishing

As Google announces that Hangouts, its most successful Google+ feature, will be making its fist external appearance on NFL.com, The Next Web asks: Could broadcast journalism see a revival in online media? Joel Falconer makes the case for online broadcasters to “use tools such as Hangouts to deliver news as it comes in.”

The New York Times has agreed to sell the struggling About group, including search site About.com, to Barry Diller’s IAC/Interactive for $300 million in cash, reports the Media Decoder blog.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-27 17:20

When the Editors Weblog first reported on Forbes’s acquisition of True/Slant, an online-only news source that published the work of hundreds of expert contributors, it was rather unclear how the start-up would fare as part of Forbes’s vast media empire. Many saw the sale as a means for Forbes to re-employ True/Slant’s creator Lewis Dvorkin, who resigned as an executive editor at the business publication in 2008. After the sale, Dvorkin rejoined Forbes as chief product officer, charged with increasing audience engagement and re-working Forbes’s titles.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-27 16:24

At leading media companies, like The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, the majority of traffic now bypasses the homepage, writes Neiman Lab's Adrienne LaFrance. Newsrooms are increasingly finding that visitors to their sites are "coming in through the sidedoor" meaning homepages are perhaps less important than they once were. 

Media Network Carat is predicting that digital ad spending will surpass newspaper ad spending this year. Btobonline reports that "digital ad spending will garner a 15.3 percent share of the global ad market this year, up from a March projection of 14.5 percent."

Meanwhile time is of the essence for Time Inc.'s digital overhaul, according to the New York Post's Keith J. Kelly, who writes: "after operating profit tumbled more than 40 percent in the most recent quarter, there’s a new sense of urgency surrounding Time Inc. and its push to capture digital dollars."

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-24 18:37

After three years as chief digital officer at News Corporation, Chris Miller has announced his departure from the company, effective as of next month. Miller seems to be parting on good terms and will, according to a News Corp. press release, continue to work “as an outside advisor [to the company] on digital issues through fall 2013.”

Having been drafted into the company in 2009 to reinvigorate News Corp.’s diverse (and struggling) digital assets, a key part of Miller’s role was making digital a priority across the company’s numerous news divisions. During his tenure, Miller oversaw the introduction of a paywall at the Times of London and the Wall Street Journal and was a leading force behind the initiative to incorporate the use of video in News Corp.’s traditional news publications. As a result, reporters at the WSJ are now trained in using video functions on their smartphones.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-24 14:27

Fairfax News and Media Company has posted losses of A$2.732 billion for the financial year 2011/12, after writing down its media businesses and plants and equipment (including printing presses in Tullamarine and Chullora that are to be shut down in 2014) by almost A$3 billion. The losses announced on Thursday for the year to June were seven times higher than those for the same period in 2010-11, which stood at $390.9 million. Fairfax is Australia’s oldest news publisher, and its titles include the country’s oldest paper, The Sydney Morning Herald

The company’s write-down of mastheads and goodwill comes in light of the woeful financial forecasts predicted for the next three years. In a statement following the release of the company’s full-year financial results, Fairfax Chief Executive Greg Hywood said: "The assessment of the carrying value of our intangible assets - mastheads, goodwill and customer relationships - is based on the three-year outlook for each of our business units. That outlook worsened considerably over the course of the second half of the year as the cyclical downturn became more pronounced, and our confidence in a sustained improvement in market conditions reduced."

Commenting on the present state of the advertising market, Hywood expressed his belief that never in his 30-year career had it been in such a bad condition, but he also added that the present drop in advertising revenue was part of a “cycle” and would “inevitably pass.”

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-23 18:00

A new long-form journalism websitecalled Mampoer, and based in South Africa, is preparing to launch in the near future, according to journalism.co.uk's Rachel McAthy. Mampoer, "will invite writers to submit pieces of long-form journalism to be downloadable on digital devices," McAthy writes.

Every daily and Sunday title in Northern Ireland suffered circulation declinesin the latest ABC report according to an article posted on PressGazette.co.uk. Northern Ireland’s largest-selling daily, The Belfast Telegraph, fell 9.2 percent to 53,847, the article states.

The UK's Independent says prosecutors involved in the phone hacking scandal will reveal a list of the names of up to 600 victims"within weeks."

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-23 17:54

In an article on Adweek's website, Lucia Moses looks at the hugely successful but low-budget approach that US-based publisher Condé Nast has taken in expanding its empire overseas.

In the UK, Robert Andrews on the paidContent website writes that Johnston Press, which publishes some 230 regional newspapers, is gaining ground with its new digital strategy and its use of online outsourcing.

AFP is reporting that the Foreign Correspondents' Clubs of Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong have expressed alarm over recent reports of intimidation against foreign journalists working in China.

On the MediaShift Idea Lab website, Heather Ford discusses how Wikipedia manages sources for breaking news.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-22 18:41

What do you do when you’ve already launched two incredibly successful publishing platforms? If you’re Twitter co-founders Evan Williams and Biz Stone, the answer is simple: work on another one.

Just over a week ago Obvious Corporation, the company that developed Blogger and Twitter, unveiled Medium, a collaborative publishing tool designed as a simple way for users to express themselves online with images and text. At first glance this basic premise suggests that Medium has little to offer that is not already provided by other blogging sites. Indeed, GigaOM’s Mathew Ingram commentedthat Medium “feels like a cross between Tumblr and Pinterest.” The site’s format is agreeably simple, with both text and photos organised on a grid-based layout. Medium, like Tumblr, provides a simple article template for each post, and a lack of superfluous visual elements and advertisements contribute to an overall sense of elegance and efficiency.  

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-22 17:22

The New York Times reports that while "most Western broadcasting and newspaper companies are retrenching, China’s state-run news media giants are rapidly expanding in Africaand across the developing world." The article states the efforts are aimed at improving China’s image and influence around the globe.

Rappler, a news startup in the Philippines, is taking a social media approach to news and using a "mood meter" with its stories in an attempt to understand the role of emotion in newsaccording to an article from Adrienne LaFrance on theNieman Lab website.

Twitter could face legal action in India if the website fails to comply with the government's demand to censor objectionable contentposted by users, according to a report from The Times of India.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-21 18:57

Curation, aggregation, 140 characters, constant updates, 24 hours a day, seven days a week: despite being easier than ever to access, reading the news online can be exhausting. In this digital age we can follow a story from its birth, watch it grow, develop and fade away. The problem is that this process frequently takes place in one quick burst – over the course of a day, maybe two – infusing online news sites like the Huffington Post with a wearying frenetic quality. It’s no secret that the rush to be the first to report breaking news means that concerns such as narrative depth, context and analysis are frequently marginalised, but fortunately for those searching for respite from the onslaught of breaking news, long-form journalism is undergoing a revival.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-21 18:22

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