Date

Wed - 23.07.2014


Advertising

By now you’ll have heard an awful lot about native advertising. Like the fact that it will save us all (maybe), that news companies see a financial future in it, and that it while it sure can attract a whole lotta love, alas, the time has not come for The New York Times to embrace it.

A quick recap: native advertising is independently compelling content (text, video or other) that is paid for by a brand, and semi-camouflaged in a publication’s natural editorial environment. It should neither stick out like a sore thumb nor dupe the reader, somewhat like how the model in the picture above blends prettily into her bed of leaves, without leading anyone to believe that she herself is plant-based.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-16 18:48

Through gloomy economic conditions shines a rare glimmer of British sun: spending on Internet and mobile advertising in the UK rose to a record six-month high in the first half of this year to reach nearly £2.6 billion.

This represents a 12.6 percent increase from the first half of 2011, during which £2.3 billion was spent on Internet and mobile advertising.

These figures come from the latest Internet Advertising Bureau UK (IAB) Expenditure Report, published today, which is based on a survey conducted by Pricewaterhouse Coopers measuring like-for-like, year-on-year growth.*

Other key findings include:

  • Mobile ad spend more than doubled
  • Paid search advertising dominates digital ad spend across platforms
  • Online video advertising increased by nearly half

Mobile advertising

Spending on mobile advertising has continued what the report refers to as its “meteoric rise,” soaring 132 percent to £181.5 million. As we reported in March, mobile ad spend grew 157 percent from 2010 to 2011, according to IAB.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-09 17:08

A healthy rise in online and mobile advertising revenue in 2012 and 2013 will more than compensate for the steep losses facing the traditional publishing sector, predicts a new report by Media buying network GroupM.

The group, which calls itself "the world's number one media investment management operation," estimates that Britain's overall advertising market will grow sluggishly this year and next, with only moderate help from the London Olympic Games.

Digital high jump

The UK is recognized as a world leader in digital ad spending as a percent of total media, and the upward trend looks set to continue into 2013, according to GroupM futures director Adam Smith. “Digital spending growth already represents a quarter of the entire UK marketing economy, and it continues to grow,” he said on the GroupM website.

The report predicts that digital advertising spending will jump by 11 percent between this year and next, surpassing £5.3 billion ($8.3 billion) by the end of 2012, and reaching £6 billion ($9.4 billion) in 2013.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-03 16:42

The US newspaper industry is facing some very bad news: growth in digital ad revenue is declining. A story published by Reuters today states that, according to statistics from the Newspaper Association of America, digital ad revenues at newspapers are up just 1% from a year ago, making this the fifth quarter in a row that growth has dropped.

Reuters reports that online ad revenues at the New York Times Company experienced a 2.3% drop to $48 million in the first quarter, compared to the same period the year before. At the Washington Post Company, online ad revenue fell 7% to $24.2 million, the article says.

What’s going wrong? Reuters says that experts blame the existence of too much advertising space online, the rise in discount-rate ad spots, and a tough economic climate in the US for the slowdown.

When the New York Times Company originally announced its decline in digital ad revenue, paidContent reported on an earnings call with CFO James Follo, who “explained that digital ad sales have long been insulated from macro-economic events. Starting in 2011, however, these ad sales began to be sensitive to the European debt crisis and other events that affect print ad sales.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-07 15:43

The New York Times: purveyor of “All The News That’s Fit To Print.” And now, all the news that’s fit to stream too?

A Nieman Lab reports, The Times has struck a licensing agreement with Hulu, making some of its video content available through the popular online streaming service. For the moment, the only Times video that is on offer with Hulu is a documentary about hockey named “Punched Out: The Life and Death of an N.H.L. Enforcer,” but Nieman Lab writes that more content is due to be uploaded soon.  

Author of the article Justin Ellis suggests that putting content on Hulu has both pros and cons for the Times. “On Hulu, a viewer may be more likely to seek a lean-back entertainment and watch a video longer than five minutes,” writes Ellis, “But by putting the videos on Hulu, the Times is also sending eyeballs off their property and adding an intermediary who’ll expect a cut of the ad revenue.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-04 17:07

Why would a company pay a newspaper for advertising, when it can broadcast directly to its audience online? The question has long been perplexing newspaper companies, who are seeing their revenues drop as a consequence of brands cutting them out of the advertising process and going straight to Twitter or Facebook to reach their customers.  

But instead of fighting the shift, the New York Times Company launched a new advertising initiative yesterday, which aims to benefit from the fact that brands are becoming their own publishers. Ricochet, as the Times’s product is called, hopes to generate revenue by allowing brands to select specific New York Times content that is relevant to their customers, and then to share links to a version of that content surrounded by their own advertising.

“In the traditional advertising model, brands reach audiences through content; by contrast, using Ricochet, content reaches audiences through brands," explains the vice president of research and development at the Times, Michael Zimbalist, quoted in the official press release.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-27 15:37

Hi-Media, a real-time bidding advertising solution provider in France, has one clear goal for its publishing clients: to continuously find new ways to grow and improve efficiency in online advertising.

Cyril Zimmermann, CEO of Hi-Media, said the company has come a long way since the Internet bubble burst in 2001. “Basically we were facing bankruptcy from 2001 to 2003, but advertising revenue kept us afloat, but more importantly that time allowed us to look very closely at the online advertising business. And while everybody thought there was no ceiling online, indeed there was. Our job was to maximise the efficiency heading up there.”

The lessons learned during that time were to figure out for publishers how best to: 1) optimise advertising inventory sales, 2) make paid content acceptable by users, and 3) stay independent from large proprietary platforms.

For more on this story, please see our Digital Media Europe blog

Author

Dean Roper's picture

Dean Roper

Date

2012-04-16 18:05

For a long time, advertising revenue has been the life-blood of newspapers. But as media companies manage the switch from print to digital publishing, their advertising sales strategies have to evolve rapidly too.

How can you integrate print and digital sales teams? How can you still get the most out of print ads? How can you harness social media to boost your advertising? And how can you find new online revenue streams?

These were some of the questions addressed at WAN-IFRA’s 22nd World Newspaper Advertising Conference in Prague at the beginning of last month, where speakers included Will Goodhand, "Juicy Evangelist" at BrainJuicer in the UK, Peter Zollman, Founding Principal of AIM Group and Classified Intelligence and Halvard Kristiansen, Head of Behavioural Targeting for Schibsted in Sweden.

WAN-IFRA’s full summary of the conference is available now to download here.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-05 12:38

Today, free UK newspaper Metro announced the launch of a targeted consumer marketing campaign in London aimed to increase readership of its tablet edition, according to a press release. The campaign, which will continue for the rest of the week, aims to reach the “urbanite” audience that falls outside of Metro’s commuter distribution areas.

Advertisements will run on digital screens in London’s major train stations, in the print editions of Metro, on the music streaming service Spotify and through in-app ads, the release said.

The station ads, starting at 4pm each day, instruct viewers to take a picture of the front page of Metro’s tablet edition and then tweet the photo to @MetroUK with the hashtag #tablet and the viewer’s location, from which one winner will be chosen per day. Each day’s winner will then be entered for the chance to win a tablet.

The print ads include information about the tablet edition ads at train stations, but also instruct readers to download Blippar, an image-recognition app, on their mobile phones to play a 3D game, from which they will also have a chance to win a tablet, the release said.

Metro’s ads on Spotify offer consumers yet another chance to win something: by clicking on display ads, users are directed to Metro's Facebook page where they can enter to win a year-long membership to Spotify Premium.  

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-26 15:48

According to a new report released by the Internet Advertising Bureau and PricewaterhouseCoopers, mobile advertising spending in the UK increased by 157% from 2010 to 2011, The Guardian reported. Spending climbed from £83 million in 2010 to £203 million in 2011, the article said.

Mark Sweney of The Guardian attributes the rise in spending to the increased popularity of 3G and Wi-Fi, as well as the use of targeted advertising through mobile.

According to the article, the report also found that display advertising had the highest percentage increase, up 186% from 2010. Display advertising has risen drastically since 2008, the year mobile apps became widely available, and mobile search advertising has also increased by 145%, the article said.

Mobile Marketing reported last year that mobile ad spending in the UK doubled from 2009 to 2010, including vast increases in mobile search advertising and display advertising.

As we previously reported, a 2011 comScore study showed the UK had the highest percentage of news website traffic from mobile devices.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-20 19:31

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