WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Mon - 22.12.2014


Industry Trends

“The change in the industry right now is the most dramatic I've ever seen... Virtually every paper in the country is, if not diving head first, at least dipping [its] toes into video,” said videographer Chuck Fadley to the American Journalism Review.

That was nearly four years ago; it is now safe to say they are doing canon balls.

The New York Times, which started including videos with digital news stories seven years ago, now produces approximately 120 videos per month, and streams two live shows to its website every business day. The Wall Street Journal, which began shooting video more than three years ago, now produces about 50 clips per day, as well as nine live shows from around the globe. Meanwhile, the U.S. edition of the Huffington Post has recently unveiled HuffPost Live, a plan to stream live video to its website for 12 hours five days a week beginning on August 13.

Logically enough, the news content is attracted by the prospect of advertising revenue.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-23 15:03

The Tribune Company’s decision to outsource the production of TribLocal to the cheap content providing company Journatic sparked controversy when it was announced at the beginning of last week. But more recently, Journatic founder and CEO Brian Timpone has defended the quality of the content his company produces, suggesting that it is more efficient and higher quality than many of its competitors.

Negative reactions to the deal focused on the Chicago Tribune’s admission that “about half of TribLocal's 40 staffers, including copy editors, designers and web producers, will see their jobs phased out during the transition,” of which 11 to 18 TribLocal reporters will be transferred to the Chicago Tribune’s suburban bureaus. Departing staff will be replaced by Journatic content, which, as Poynter explains, is based on large amounts of publically available information. This data is then converted into stories by freelancers, who are paid between $4 and $2 a piece. Journatic writers are expected to produce these items in 10 - 20 minutes each, earning them a wage of around $12 per hour.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-02 18:14

Spain’s economy and the newspaper industry have both been under pressure in recent years, to put it mildly. But now, in the opinion of the Spanish Federation of Journalists' Associations (FAPE), a crisis point has been reached. FAPE writes that 97% of its 20,000 journalist members are preparing to protest against threats to their industry on World Press Freedom Day on May 3, under the slogan “Without journalists, there is no journalism, without journalism, there is no democracy”.

FAPE members are preparing to “denounce the difficult situation that journalism is going through” in 41 cities across Spain, and the association is calling on the public to support its rallies.

According to FAPE, 6,234 journalists have been laid off since the financial crisis hit in 2008, 57 media organisations have been closed, and 23 have introduced redundancies. FAPE president Elsa González has blamed media executives for the industry’s current problems, and has accused them of “opting to dramatically reduce staff numbers without a clear commitment to innovation and training” instead of supporting “journalism adapted to the demands of people living in the 21st century”. 

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-02 13:51

Die Zeit’s paper and online editions are better off as independent entities, said Wolfgang Blau, editor of Zeit Online. The weekly print paper is run out of Hamburg, while the website is based in Berlin. Blau was speaking at the International Journalism Festival in Perugia, Italy, on a panel on the future of weeklies.

Many European newspapers are moving towards a more integrated structure, but Blau argued that the culture and reporting structures are different in print and online, and hence it makes sense to keep them somewhat separate, although of course with collaboration between the two. As the paper’s circulation is growing and revenue is still going up, the approach seems to be working for Die Zeit.

One third of Die Zeit's editors frequently contribute articles written exlusively for Zeit Online, Blau said, a number which is much higher than at the paper’s competitors. The Economist’s website, for example, is full of content produced by the print journalists, who embrace the opportunity to write blog posts and more, said the paper’s social media editor Mark Johnson.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-04-30 11:26

According to Google, the question that businesses should be asking isn’t whether or not to invest in mobile, but how. And Google is right there to provide the answers with the release of The Mobile Playbook, Mashable reports.

Coauthored by Google’s Head of Mobile Sales and Strategy Jason Spero and Senior Product Marketing Manager for Mobile Ads Johanna Werther, The Mobile Playbook: The Busy Executive’s Guide to Winning with Mobile asks “five crucial mobile questions” that business executives should explore: How does mobile change our value proposition? How does mobile impact our digital destinations? How is our organization adapting to mobile? How should our marketing adapt to mobile? How can we connect with our tablet audience?

Addressing each question, the Playbook also offers several strategies that businesses can use to understand their mobile potential, including using focus groups and surveys to get a sense of their audiences’ mobile habits. Additionally, the guide features case studies of various companies that have been using mobile technology successfully.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-26 16:32

Tumblr is planning to allow brands to promote themselves by buying a spot on its Radar feature, wrote GigaOm yesterday. The site’s founder David Karp, who is quoted in the article, explains that the change is “about making Tumblr much more accessible to brands.” The move should help Tumblr, which has been booming in recent months, profit from its ever-growing audience.  

GigaOm explains that Radar, part of the Tumblr dashboard that highlights editorially-curated posts, currently features around 15 posts a day, and receives about 120 million daily impressions. This is an audience that advertisers will be able to tap into directly into starting May 2.

The new feature, like promoted Tweets on Twitter, allows Tumblr to monetize an organic part of its site, rather than selling display advertising. This means that Tumblr will be able to make money, and brands will be able to integrate themselves into every-day users’ social experience. Karp, quoted by GigaOm, touts the power of the new ads, suggesting that Tumblr’s flexible format will allow brands to unleash their creativity, rather than constraining them to short phrases like Twitter.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-19 14:41

Online newspapers tired of catering to Apple’s in-app purchasing restrictions are starting to bypass the tech giant completely by creating web-based apps using HTML5 technology, Journalism.co.uk reports. The latest title to jump on the trend? Washington’s local paper The Chronicle, which offers the HTML5 app as part of a subscription bundle that includes complete online and print access, the article said.

The Chronicle’s web app is similar to a “native” iPad app in terms of user experience; rather than downloading the app from Apple’s Newsstand, though, one can access the web app through the iPad’s Internet browser and save it as an icon on the homescreen, the article said. App users can share articles through Facebook and Twitter, as well as download stories to read them offline later, the article said.

CEO Scott Karp of Publish2, the platform that supports the Chronicle’s web app, told Journalism.co.uk the HTML5 version is a “seamless extension of the subscription model.” The Chronicle plans to launch an Android-friendly version of the app in the near future, according to the article.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-19 14:41

U.S. mobile ad spending, including display, search and messaging-based advertising, totalled US$320 million in 2008, and exceeded $593 million in 2010, according to eMarketer. In 2013, it is expected to surpass $1.5 billion, detailed in World Digital Media Trends 2010, released by the Shaping the Future of the Newspaper project and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

To break down as national versus local, back in 2005, U.S. mobile national ads accounted for $138 million, while local was only niche, according to the 2009 third quarter data from Borrell Associates. In 2014, national mobile ad spending is forecast to exceed $5.5 billion, while local mobile ads will surpass $4.7 billion.

To break down by format, in 2008, SMS accounted for $100 million, making it 63 percent of total U.S. mobile ad revenues in that year. Search totalled $39 million and display made up $21 million, each contributing 24 percent and 13 percent, respectively, according to data from the Kelsey Group and eMarketer.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-12-17 17:40

The most popular content consumed by iPhone users and all smartphone users in the United Kingdom is access to news via mobile browser (79.7 percent and 48 percent, respectively) in January 2009, according to comScore. By comparison, 55.6 percent of iPhone users and 22.1 percent of all smartphone users accessed news and information by downloaded applications, detailed in World Digital Media Trends 2010, released by the Shaping the Future of the Newspaper project and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

E-mail was accessed by 75.4 percent of iPhone users and by 35.4 percent of all smartphone users, while listening to mobile music was consumed by 65.6 percent of iPhone users and 40.5 percent of all smartphone users during the same period. By comparison, a fraction of all mobile phone users did any of these activities.

For World Digital Media Trends 2010, the SFN project has partnered with 66 research companies - including PricewaterhouseCoopers, the Pew Research Center, Magna Global, comScore, ZenithOptimedia, eMarketer, and more - to piece together the vast landscape of the world's media and advertising markets, as well as emerging trends across platforms.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-12-16 18:05

Newspaper publishers around the globe understand their traditional revenue sources will not return to the levels they enjoyed in years past, and they are making the development of new products and new channels their top priorities for more profit, the second annual World News Future & Change Study concludes.

Continual transformation and change is a way of life in the media world, not a one-time process, they acknowledge in the study, conducted by the Shaping the Future of the Newspaper project, of the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers' (WAN-IFRA), in partnership with the Norwegian School of Management (BI) and the University of Central Lancashire (UCLAN) in the United Kingdom.

The report provides publishers with good reason to cheer up and look forward to the next decade in the 21st century, UCLAN's Francois Nel, one of the collaborators on the study, wrote today. His top three findings from the report are:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-15 18:03

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