WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Tue - 02.09.2014


Journalism

More than 180 US newspapers now have some form of paywall in place, according to a report from Newspapers & Technology, and that number is destined to grow as various chains, such as Gannett and Lee Enterprises extend the roll out of digital subscription models across their newspapers.

Commuters rejoice: you need never again be caught rushing into a plane or train without having downloaded the day’s stories. News.me and Instapaper now use geofencing to let your location tell your digital device when to update your content, reports the Nieman Lab.

More good news for commuters: Atlantic Media is gathering elite journalists for a new mobile- and tablet-focused product, Quartz, reports AdWeek.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-05 11:33

The formerly digital-only Voice of San Diego announced last week that it would launch a print-on-demand monthly magazine using MagCloud, a Hewlett-Packard-powered platform that handles transactions, printing, shipping, and digital distribution, the Knight Digital Media Center has reported.

This niche news venue out of Southern California is not the only former pureplayer dabbling in print: “Some of the Internet's big players – fashion sites such as style.com, asos.com and netaporter.com, online kids' game Moshi Monsters and yes, even Google itself – are now publishing print magazines, using traditional media to refresh the parts of their business model that other solutions can't reach,” wrote the Guardian’s Mark Hooper yesterday.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-04 18:55

Google has added a new feature that will notify its Chinese users if they search for a term that has been blocked by the country’s “Great Firewall” and will advise them to change the wording of their search, reports the AP, reprinted in the Washington Post.

The Italian reporter Gianluigi Nuzzi, who has published a book about corruption in the Vatican said to be based on information provided by 10 whistleblowers, has defended himself against Vatican accusations that he is a criminal, reports Reuters, in this article reprinted by the Chicago Tribune.

In an article for paidContent, Ben Elowitz, CEO and co-founder of the web publisher Wetpaint, advises news organisations to spend more time focusing on ways to reach and grow their audience. “Content is just a means to an end. The end – and media’s greatest asset – is audience,” writes Elowitz.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-01 17:41

Good news for royalists and for fans of free content. Press Gazette reports that The Times and Sunday Times of London will be dropping their paywalls this weekend in honour of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. The Sunday Times app will also be available for free trial period over the weekend, notes the article.

Will Bunch from Poynter weighs the arguments about the New Orleans Times-Picayune’s decision to cut print publication to just three days a week and go digital first. In this thoughtful article, Bunch suggests ways to move beyond the conflict between print-first and digital-first advocates, and create better and more inclusive news reporting in New Orleans.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-31 16:57

Newsrooms from Montreal to Denver are editing out their copy desks to keep up with digital’s dual imperative: tight deadlines and tighter budgets.

Monday’s announcement by Postmedia Network means that dozens of copy editing jobs will be axed across Canada in coming weeks; Twitter speculation has it that 23 editors will be let go at the Montreal Gazette alone, reports the Huffington Post Canada.

Yesterday, Postmedia's the National Post offered a warning of the perils of doing away with copy editors when it mistakenly published a crossword puzzle that had already been filled in, revealed Poynter.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-30 18:20

“Citizen Media is the new form of a newswire, often quicker than anything else,” said Riyaad Minty, Al Jazeera’s head of social media, in an email exchange with WAN-IFRA earlier this year.

This may be true, but dealing with content from the Internet requires high standards of authentication, and sometimes even big players mess up. During the past week, the BBC has become a case in point. It has made two mistakes with sourcing its images – one serious, one merely embarrassing.

The major error came when the BBC mistakenly used an image taken in Iraq in 2003 to accompany an online story about the recent massacre in Houla, Syria. As Poynter reports, the caption to the photo, shown on the BBC’s website, read, “this image – which cannot be independently verified – is believed to show the bodies of children in Houla awaiting burial.” The picture was credited to an anonymous “Activist.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-29 18:54

The Russian radio presenter Sergei Aslanyan has been hospitalised, after being lured out of his house and stabbed 20 times in the arms, neck and chest, says the Guardian. The article reports that Izvestiya newspaper has suggested the attack may be linked to a recent radio appearance made by Aslanyan, in which he said disparaging things about the prophet Mohammed. However, it also notes that the attack may be connected with reporting that Aslanyan has done on the Russian car industry and corruption among traffic police.

The Guardian’s Datablog and Datastore celebrated their third birthday last April, at the same time as clocking up an an average of more that 1 million monthly users during the past year, writes Journalism.co.uk. The article quotes Simon Rogers, editor of the Guardian’s data content, who says, “For us, what started off as an exercise for developers has proved really successful with the general readership too.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-29 18:40

The UK Supreme Court is preparing to decide next Wednesday whether Julian Assange should be deported to Sweden, where he is wanted for questioning over allegations of sexual assault, reports the Guardian. The paper writes that the verdict is likely to hinge on the judges’ decision over whether the European Arrest Warrant issued for Assange is valid.

El Pais has posted a video interview with John Paton, CEO of Digital First Media, who explains the “digital first” philosophy that underpins his company. “Technology is 100% of the future,” he says.

Press Gazette reports that the Sun’s Fabulous magazine is re-launching its website in a new, blog-style format. The article notes that stories used to be posted on the website just once a week, but now, according to editor Rachel Richardson, it will be edited “literally minute by minute.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-23 16:34

Capital New York writes that the Huffington Post is pushing ahead with its plans to launch a live video streaming network. The new product, which has been named HuffPost Live, aims to feature 12 hours of original programming every weekday, produced by a staff of around 100, says the article.

As Erik Wemple at the Washington Post reported yesterday, The New York Times Public Editor Arthur Brisbane will be stepping down at the beginning on September. Now Craig Silverman at Poynter suggests five qualities that The Times should look for as it tries to find a new person to fill the roll.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-22 17:29

Eric Newton, senior adviser to the president at Knight Foundation, has criticised the state of journalism education in the US, reports Steve Myers at Poynter. Newton argues that most journalism teaching centers had been slow to adapt to changes in the news industry and he suggests that, it should be reformed to allow more input from journalism professionals as well as academics.

The New York Times reports that Pakistani authorities blocked access to Twitter on Sunday, after accusing the social network of promoting a cartoon contest on Facebook to post images of the prophet Mohammed. Twitter access was restored around 10pm Sunday evening, notes the article, at which time “It remained unclear — and unlikely — that Twitter had agreed to the demands of the Pakistani government”.

WikiLeaks Tweeted today that the organisation is preparing to file suit against the US military over the case of Bradley Manning, the US soldier accused of having leaked a massive number of classified documents to the whistleblowing organisation.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-21 17:09

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