WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Sat - 20.12.2014


Journalism

by Robert Niles

I'd like to point you toward a post from Dallas NBA team owner and Internet entrepreneur Mark Cuban which I hope will get you thinking, but might just get many of you mad instead:

[...]here's a taste:

In the year 2011, I'm not sure I have a need for beat writers from ESPN.com, Yahoo, or any website for that matter to ever be in our locker room before or after a game. I think we have finally reached a point where not only can we communicate any and all factual information from our players and team directly to our fans and customers as effectively as any big sports website, but I think we have also reached a point where our interests are no longer aligned.

Continue reading on The Online Journalism Review

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-05 08:57

Time Inc., the country's largest magazine publisher, has reached a deal with Apple Inc. (AAPL) to make all its iPad editions free for print subscribers, marking a break in the impasse between publishers and Apple and lending support to Time's contention that it's business-as-usual after the ouster of its chief executive.

Starting Monday, subscribers to Sports Illustrated, Time and Fortune magazines will be able to access the iPad editions via the apps, which will be able to authenticate them as subscribers. Time Inc.'s People magazine already had such an arrangement, but readers of most publications have had to pay separately for the iPad version regardless of their subscriber status.

Continue reading on Morningstar

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-04 10:20

by Ken Doctor

What's a story worth?

Last week, I looked at a single investigative story (California Watch's "On Shaky Ground"), and we saw the tab of half a million dollars for a 20-month-long tale of sleuthing. What about that ordinary daily story, quotidian journalism as we know it -- the grinding out of less eventful articles, the kinds of things that keep us informed but don't offer epiphanies? How much does it cost, and how much does that matter to the future of the news business?

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-04 10:06

Among trends in the media industry, one of the most promising is the increasing readiness of consumers to pay for content, says Marcel Fenez, a Global Entertainment and Media Leader for PricewaterhouseCoopers, in a presentation of many of those trends.

Mr Fenez made his presentation at WAN-IFRA's Publish Asia 2011, being held in Bangkok from 27 to 29 April.

"They are giving us hints about what they want to pay for," he says.

"They're telling us three things - I will pay for convenience, I will obviously pay for quality, because one of the things we know about free content is that very often the quality is not very high, and they're also telling us they'll pay for a higher quality experience," Mr Fenez says.

Regarding the last point, Mr Fenez used the example of someone paying a high price to go to a concert yet illegally downloading music from the internet. "Why will people pay $150 to go to a gig but not pay for music? What they tell us is, it's the enriched experience. Content alone is not enough, it has to be more than that.

"Though content is king, we have to rely on more than just content," he says. "We have to provide convenience, we have to provide quality, and we have to provide the experience."

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-31 16:57

Guardian News & Media is ending the project it launched in 2010 to try and figure out the future of local journalism.

"Unfortunately, while the blogs have found engaged local readerships and had good editorial impact, the project is not sustainable in its present form," writes the publisher's digital engagement head Meg Pickard.

Continue reading on paidContent.org

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-31 16:42

While newspaper circulation in much of the world declines, it continues to grow in India. And the prospect for future growth is excellent, says Ravi Dhariwal, CEO of Bennet, Coleman & Co., the publisher of The Times of India.

Mr Dhariwal delivered the keynote address at WAN-IFRA's Publish Asia 2011, being held in Bangkok from 27 to 29 April.
India's population continues to grow, as does its literacy rate, so future readership is also likely to increase, he says. Advertising growth also has great potential.

For the Times of India, it's all about brand, he says. The 173-year old paper "tries to capture our country on a particular day and the people's aspirations," he says. We don't consider the Prime Minister or the President as the leaders of India, we treat the reader as the CEO."

In a wide-ranging keynote address that presented a case study of the Times' success, Mr Dhariwal pointed to the following elements that characterizes the Times of India brand:

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-31 09:46

by Gary Randazzo

Virtually all newspapers have websites that look good and have great functionality. So why aren't they all producing acceptable amounts of profit? The question probably should be asked differently, "What do consumers and advertisers expect from newspapers?" Then ask, "What do they expect from the Internet?"

Continue reading on Editor & Publisher

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-31 09:29

Mobile advertising is growing fast, but mobile banner ads generally annoy users--which means they don't serve advertisers well and so are doubly bad news for news orgs. But the Spokesman-Review (Spokane, Wa.) has built its own system for creating mobile-friendly ads augmented with useful information for people on the go.

Ryan Pitts, senior editor of digital media for the paper, says these ads are selling better than expected...

Continue reading on Knight Digital Media Center

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-30 08:59

Las Vegas Sun reporters Marshall Allen and Alex Richards were given two years to achieve one goal: "Find out what's right, and wrong, about our local health care delivery system."

The 2.9 million public documents that they examined and hundreds of interviews that they conducted exposed thousands of preventable medical mistakes in Las Vegas hospitals. The Nevada legislature responded with six pieces of legislation that are still up for debate and, this week the Pulitzer Prize Board named Allen, Richards and The Sun a finalist in local reporting.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-30 08:49

In the wake of the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, local newspapers in the quake-hit Tohoku region suffered massive power outages, forcing them to suspend operations of the servers for their websites and bringing down local Internet connections. As access to their news sites was blocked, newspaper publishers turned to Twitter to continue to send out disaster-related information - especially detailed reports of damage and information closely related to people's daily lives.

Continue reading on NSK News Bulletin Online

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-28 18:07

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