WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Fri - 19.09.2014


Launches and Closures

Not content with a soon-to-be-launched video streaming network and a host of new European editions, the Huffington Post is releasing a new weekly iPad magazine tomorrow named “Huffington.

The New York Times previews the new publication, noting that some content will be pulled from huffingtonpost.com, but other articles will also be “new and separate from that of the rest of the site”. The magazine, which is only available though the Apple store, will feature a mix of long-form pieces (of between 4,000 and 8,000 words), photos, commentary, reviews, illustrations, videos and data visualisations.

“From the beginning we wanted to do something that felt like a print magazine," says Huffington’s creative director Josh Klenert (formerly of Billboard), quoted by Joe Pompeo at Capital New York.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-13 18:07

Against a background of cuts and layoffs in the Spanish media, The Huffington Post’s Spanish counterpart El Huffington Post was launched in Madrid yesterday, marking the latest step in the brand’s global expansion.

The launch represents a fusion between traditional and new media brands. As Bloomberg Businessweek reports, El Huffington Post is being produced from the offices of Spain’s leading newspaper El País, and is 50% owned by El País’s parent company Prisa.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-07 18:23

Reports about the global newspaper industry collapsing around our ears are a fairly common occurrence nowadays - Jack Shafer’s piece for Reuters yesterday titled “The great newspaper liquidation” is just one example. But two publications that have been defying the general gloom and growing their profits are the Economist and the Financial Times.

This being the case, perhaps it’s no surprise that Atlantic Media announced earlier this year that it would be launching a new publication to take "a run at the space that The Economist and the Financial Times currently occupy."

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-06 15:45

Not all paywalls are created equal: RR Donnelly’s Press+ announced yesterday that it would extend a grandfather clause to Google One Pass subscribers after Google closed its paid content platform on Friday, according to a press release.

Press+, a metered paywall platform which launched in 2009, currently has over 300 publications on its service, including newspapers from McClatchy and Tribune Co., as we previously reported. With the Press+ model, publishers allow users on average access to 5-15 articles per month, after which users must subscribe in order to view content. 

“We will maintain subscriber accounts for whichever publishers might have signed on with Google without charging our usual revenue share,” said Press+ cofounder Steven Brill in the press release. “We’ll only charge for all the new customers we generate going forward once our seamless transition is completed.”

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-24 12:43

Joint paywall platform Piano Media announced today that it has acquired €2 million in growth capital from 3TS Capital Partners Technology in Central and Eastern Europe Fund, according to a press release. Piano will use the investment to expand its global development and marketing efforts, the release said.

Launched in Slovakia in May 2011 and later expanded to Slovenia in January 2012, Piano Media is an online subscription-based payment service that groups major media outlets into a national paywall, as we previously reported. Currently, 20 publishers with 60 news websites participate in the Piano Media system, according to the release.

Piano Chief Executive and Founder Tomáš Bella said in the press release, “Our €300,000 seed funding, raised in 2011, enabled us to launch in two countries and prove Piano’s model works. This deal represents the next step in Piano’s growth; helping speed our expansion, recruit top talent, ramp up our marketing, broaden our sales channels and keep improving our software.”

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-17 17:15

You want to do what now?! Crazy as the proposition might seem, The Guardian reports today that former Sunday Express editor Sue Douglas and former ITV executive Rupert Howell have been discussing the idea of launching a new Sunday tabloid, which would emulate the now defunct News of the World.

The paper suggests that the pair have approached potential investors with a total wealth of around £300 million, including Brian Kennedy, the millionaire owner of Sale Sharks rugby club.

The Guardian quotes Douglas, who says that the new Sunday tabloid “would be a reincarnation of the News of the World.” She describes the proposed publication, which would compete with News International’s newly launched Sun on Sunday, as “mischievous, punctuating pomposity, exposing hypocrisy with a smile. We have gathered quite a lot of momentum and funding."

In fact, according to an unnamed source in The Guardian, Douglas and Howell would like to go further than launching a paper, and create a whole new media brand, which would include print, digital, TV and radio offerings.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-12 18:41

Next Issue Media, comprised of Hearst Corporation, Condé Nast, News Corporation, Meredith and Time Inc., just launched its digital magazine consortium which allows subscribers to pay a monthly flat rate for access to various top-selling magazines, The New York Times Media Decoder blog reported.

After downloading the Next Issue Media tablet app, users choose to pay either $9.99 for access to all monthly publications available on the app or $14.99 for all monthly and weekly publications, the article said.

According to the Next Issue Media website, current magazines available to users include Time, The New Yorker, Better Homes and Gardens, Esquire, People, Elle and Vanity Fair, among others.

Offering a flat rate payment could save readers a great deal of money on subsciptions, since many individual magazine apps range from $1.99 to $5.99 per single issue, Media Decoder said.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-04 13:21

Following in the footsteps of recent long-form journalism start-ups, the PostDesk online platform launched today intent on reinvigorating discussion about long-form content among internet users, according to BetaKit.

PostDesk will cover in-depth news and analysis in the fields of tech, gaming, culture, politics and business, the article said. Only those with early invites can currently access the website, though the temporary PostDesk blog is available to all users. 

“PostDesk is a place to discuss, debate and read free, independent long form content such as in-depth news, reviews, investigative journalism, analysis, critique and controversial opinion pieces,” according to PostDesk’s CrunchBase profile.

A combination of in-house editors and outside contributors will be responsible for PostDesk’s content, BetaKit said. Readers will also have active roles in PostDesk, earning points and badges for thought-provoking comments and perhaps even being asked to contribute articles, BetaKit said.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-03 13:06

Slovakian start-up Piano Media reported a 37% revenue increase per 100,000 users and over €26,000 in revenue during its first month of operation in Slovenia, according to a press release.

Piano Media, an online common-payment subscription system, started as a successful national paywall in Slovakia and has since expanded to Slovenia, as previously reported. Nine Slovenian publishers are currently part of the Piano paywall system, including the national daily newspaper Dnevnik.

Piano Media spokesperson David Brauchli said in an email that while Slovenia only has 1.2 million internet users, compared to Slovakia’s 2.3 million, Piano’s revenue per 100,000 users in Slovenia was around €400 higher than in Slovakia.

As previously reported, subscriptions in Slovenia cost €1.99 per week, €4.89 per month, or €48.90 per year. 30% of profits go to Piano Media, 30% are given to the news sites where the user visits, and 40% are given to the site where the subscription is originally purchased.

“Piano's revenue is additional to what publishers are already earning from their sites, which were free before, so this immediate increase in revenue is already helping the beleaguered industry,” Brauchli said.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-16 18:13

Slate likes big books and it cannot lie... The all-digital publication will be launching a new monthly book review, which will appear on its homepage on the first weekend of every month.

The first issue will be out in full tomorrow, but two sample book reviews by Allison Benedikt and Wesley Morris have already been published today. The new section will review both fiction and non-fiction and will be produced by a mixture of staffers and freelancers.

In an blog post announcing the launch, Slate writes "Over the past few years, newspapers, magazines, and media organizations have shrunk book coverage substantially, shuttering standalone book review sections and lowering the budget and editorial energy devoted to books. Well, here at Slate, we pride ourselves on going against the conventional wisdom."

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-02 19:34

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