Date

Sat - 23.09.2017


Launches and Closures

The popular social newsreader Flipboard has announced that it's adding a new feature to its iPad app: Cover Stories.

Cover Stories, previously only available on Flipboard's mobile app, is a feature that picks links most likely to be relevant to users' interests based on what their friends are sharing and what they've previously read.

Daniel Terdiman at CNET writes that the feature learns from users' behaviour, so that the more they visit, the more relevant articles Flipboard can deliver. Terdiman quotes his colleague Rafe Needleman, who said that Cover Stories "did a good job of finding articles I didn't know about and that I would be interested in reading."

But Robert Andrews at paidContent questions the decision to launch Cover Stories on the iPad. "Since Cover Stories was designed to cater to more time-pressed mobile users, its appearance on iPad, which gets longer read times from leanback readers, seems unusual," he writes.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-01 17:49

As Gannett announced last week that it is launching paywalls around its 80 American publications (with the exception of USA Today), it feels like consumers may be getting used to the idea of being charged for some sorts of content.

But while paywalls have been tried and tested on mainstream news publications, could they ever work in the blogosphere? We're about to find out, as Australian-based fashion blog Frockwriter has announced that it will become the first blog to charge its readers for content through the Press+ revenue platform.

Frockwriter is about to collaborate with Press+ to launch a metered paywall, which will allow readers to view eight free posts per month, before charging them US$1.99 for a monthly subscription or US$19.99 for a yearly one.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-29 17:55

What do we want? In-depth journalism! When do we want it? Now!

Two reporters have responded to this rallying cry and have announced their intention to launch a new online technology magazine dedicated to long-form, quality journalism.

Jim Giles, who has written for Nature, The Atlantic, The Economist and New Scientist, and Bobbie Johnson, European editor for GigaOm and a previous tech reporter for The Guardian, created the project, which has been named Matter.

So why does Matter matter? According to a blog post by the new team, the idea is to foster thorough, long-form journalism rather than the "fast and cheap" reporting the web has encouraged so far. In a video introducing the project, Giles spells out the problem bluntly: "The thing about long-form, in-depth journalism is that it's expensive. There used to be many more newspapers and magazines that produced that kind of content, but journalism is in financial trouble and those outlets have cut back."

Johnson says when it comes to long-form journalism "we all know how important it is, but yet we're not able to support it, we haven't built ways to do it. Frankly, if nobody sticks their neck out then it's going to die away."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-27 17:43

Following the bankruptcy of its publisher Mediapubli, Spanish daily Público has announced that it will put out its final print edition this Sunday. Although the paper's website público.es will continue to operate, Cadena SER estimates that 130 of Público's 160 staff will lose their jobs.

Mediapubli declared bankruptcy at the beginning of January, and was given around a month to come up with enough funds to make Público economically viable. But although majority shareholder Jaume Roures sought investors in Mexico, Venezuela and Ecuador, the company was unable to come up with the necessary sum of around 9 million euros.

The announcement in Público said that the paper's financial difficulties were due to a worsening advertising crisis, profound changes in the newspaper industry and problems with finding new investors.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-24 17:25

By Teemu Henriksson


Storify, one of the best-known tools for creating narratives based on social media, announced the launch of its iPad application today, Mediabistro reported. The new app, which is available free on iTunes, is aimed at making on-the-go social media curation even easier than before.

Storify opened to the public less than a year ago, and it has since become well-used way for reporters to organise and present information drawn from social media. As online readers and social media users are faced with a constant flood of information, the need for curation - creating accessible narratives out of the social media content - is becoming increasingly acute.

The new iPad app offers the same basic functionalities as the Storify web app, with two major differences: the touch-enabled, "iPad-like" interface and the ability to send tweets from within the app.

For more on this story, please see our sister publication www.editorsweblog.org

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-23 10:19

The New York Times announced in a press release today that it has teamed up with Chinese publisher Shanghai Zhenwen Advertising Co., Ltd. to launch a monthly science magazine. Science Times China, as the magazine is called, is written in Chinese and sold in Beijing, Shanghai, Hong Kong and other large Chinese cities.

The press release suggests that the bulk of the magazine will consist of articles already published by the Times in English. Material will be take from the weekly science section of the Times, as well as from other relevant sections published by the Times newspaper and by nytimes.com. However, the Times will also incorporate some local Chinese content, while still retaining full editorial control over the new publication.

Michael Greenspon, general manager of The New York Times News Services Division, is quoted in the release: "New York Times readers in all corners of the world value the news, analysis and information that our journalists offer," he states. Greenspon adds that, "with the launch of Science Times China, we welcome a new group of like-minded readers to our loyal audience who are curious about seeing the world through the lens of science and technology."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-22 17:48

The Chicago News Cooperative announced officially today that it will be suspending its contributions to The New York Times. As of next Sunday, the Chicago organisation will no longer submit articles to The New York Times Midwest pages or to its website.

In a blog post announcing the change, CNC's CEO and editor James O'Shea writes that he takes "full responsibility for this situation". He laments that "unlike similar start-up efforts like the Texas Tribune in Austin, the Bay Citizen in San Francisco and ProPublica in New York, we never recruited the kind of seven figure donations from people of means concerned about the declining quality of news coverage around the country."

Rather than saying that the CNC will close down entirely, O'Shea writes that "in the coming days and weeks, we will be examining our potential to see if we can identify an alternative path and preserve some of the journalistic assets we have developed."

O'Shea writes that the CNC's decision to suspend publication "was motivated by some complex factors and unresolved questions regarding our tax status and a change in circumstances that triggered questions about the economic wisdom of commitments between the CNC and The New York Times."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-21 13:12

The Sun has announced that it will be launching a new Sunday edition this weekend.

"The Sun's future can now be reshaped as a unique seven-day proposition in both print and digital," stated Sun editor Dominic Mohan in an article discussing the launch. "Our readers' reaction to the announcement of a seventh-day Sun has been huge and we won't let them down."

The news comes as the paper is still recovering from the arrest on February 11 of five senior Sun journalists, who were later released without charge. The arrests provoked conflict at the Sun, as staff objected to the way the Management and Standards Committee - an independent body set up by News Corp to investigate allegations of illegal activities at News International - handed over large amounts of evidence to the police without consulting journalists.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-20 14:40

A year ago, Knight Foundation and Mozilla announced a partnership to build a "bridge between the technology and the news community". The $2.5 million project funded fellowships for technology experts to work in newsrooms around the world - from The Guardian to Zeit Online - to help tackle digital challenges.

Now, Dan Sinker, head of the Knight-Mozilla News Technology Partnership at Mozilla has announced that the program is evolving to engage a wider community of journalist-coders.

Four main changes are going to be made to the Knight-Mozilla partnership, which is being so radically re-jigged that it has also been re-named "OpenNews".

1) The project will help organise and pay for "more than a dozen hackdays" this year in different international locations, allowing developers to experiment with coding for journalism.

2) The parternship promises to increase online resources for developers who want to learn about journalism, and for journalists who want to learn how to code.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-07 18:17

In Slovakia two new publishers have joined Piano Media's national paywall. One publisher that already collaborates with Piano has also agreed to put Slovakia's largest regional publication behind the wall. This mean that, in total, 12 Slovakian publishers and over 50 websites are now taking part in Piano's Slovakian single-payment system.

The publisher Petit Press, which already works with Piano, is adding Korzar, a daily paper covering Eastern Slovakia, to Piano's paywall. Piano's Chief Executive Tomáš Bella is quoted in the official press release about the expansion, saying: "we couldn't be happier that Petit Press agreed to include Korzar's daily paper into our offer. They have really great coverage of eastern Slovakia and that fills a big need for our readers who don't live in Bratislava."

Publisher The Rock is adding the English-language weekly the Slovak Spectator to the paywall. Paying users will gain access to the latest PDF edition of the paper and to the Slovak Spectator's archives.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-06 17:39

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