WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Sun - 23.11.2014


mobile

When aggregation/news-reading apps are first launched, their founders tend to emit a hazily rose-tinted view of future revenue prospects. Flush with venture capital, a fledgling startup’s first priority is not to decide whether a lucrative future lies with a freemium model, paid subscriptions, and/or targeted advertising; its initial goal is to provide the best possible service and to build an “audience of significant scale”– the rest will (hopefully) fall into place. This is no longer the case for Flipboard and Pulse, two major apps in this category, which have each been around for over two years and have attracted 20 million users respectively. No longer hatchlings, these companies are entering the phase of concretizing their revenue plans, and the strategies they have selected are sharply divergent.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-12 18:29

UPDATED on Tuesday, October 2 at 11:23 am

When it comes to reading news on a small screen, U.S. consumers lean toward web browsers, with 60 percent of tablet-wielding news consumers and 61 percent of those using smartphones now accessing mobile news mostly through the web, according to a survey published today by the Pew Research Centre.

Fewer than half as many mobile news consumers, in contrast, most often use apps; that is, 23 percent of tablet news readers and 28 percent of smartphone readers. A third category, representing 16 percent of those on tablets and 11 percent on smartphones, claims to be more or less evenly split between the two.

An Online Publishers Association survey from June 2012 corroborates the trend: it found that 41 percent of tablet users mostly accessed magazine and newspaper content through the mobile web, 30 percent through single-publication apps, and 22 percent through newsstand apps.

Moreover, this year’s Pew findings follow a pattern established in last summer's survey, by which point the browser was already more popular among news consumers than apps, but to a lesser extent: 40 percent of tablet-using respondents said they used mostly the web browser for news, 21 percent leaned toward apps, and 31 percent claimed to use both equally.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-01 16:04

America’s highest-net-worth individuals have once again been ranked by bank account in the latest Forbes 400 list, and along with the paucity of exceptionally wealthy women, one of the most startling revelations is the speed at which last year’s social media chiefs have slid down the totem pole.

Together, social media’s young masters lost US$ 11 billion in a single year, raising doubts about whether wealth generated in the hype-splashed sector has staying power.

The fortune of Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg slipped the furthest. In just over three months after the social network’s widely publicized IPO “pop” in May, the company’s market value has dropped by over $50 billion dollars. Its 28-year-old founder’s net worth has dwindled by $8.1 billion to hit $9.4 billion, and his Forbes placement has fallen from 14th to 36th. In his new status, Zuckerberg is tied with another man who had a rough summer in the headlines: 81-year old Rupert Murdoch.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-20 16:51

The disruption that digital technology is causing in the publishing business is old news now. But as the debate rumbles on about how best to monetize digital content, arguably one platform isn’t being given as much thought as it deserves: mobile.

Last month the Washington Post shared a graph produced by mobile analytics firm Flurry, which compares the proportion of time that American media consumers spend with TV, web, print, radio and mobile with the proportion of money that advertisers spend on those platforms.

Data showed that American users were consuming media 22% of the time on the web, while advertisers only spent 16% of their money there. While these numbers are a little worrying, on mobile, the imbalance was far worse. Readers consumed media via mobile devices a whopping 23% of the time, but advertisers only spent 1% of the money on this platform.

Last Friday, Press Gazette quoted Ken Breen, the managing consultant for consumer media at Thomson Reuters, who said that, when it came to smartphones, news organisations were on a “journey from Kansas to Oz,” adding “we’re smack bang in the middle of a tornado at the moment."

Breen, who spoke at Press Gazette's News on the Move conference, is quoted by the publication.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-12 18:11

When News International properties The Times and The Sunday Times of London put up hard paywalls in July 2010 it seemed like their digital strategy had been decided in favour of paying users and against sharing on the web. But now an interview with News International's digital product director Nick Bell, which appeared in Paid Content earlier this week, suggests that The Times is considering making its paywall ever-so-slightly leakier by allowing subscribers to share articles with their direct friends.

Bell is quoted in the article saying that sharing has been "a hotly-debated topic" at the Times headquarters.

He promises that, "over the next six months, you will see us rewarding our paying subscribers with the ability to share amongst their network.... If they want to share content with their direct friends, then we're going to enable that."

However, the author of the Paid Content article, Robert Andrews, stresses that this is not a guarantee that Times content will be free for friends of subscribers. Bell is clear that The Times is not about to switch to a metered paywall like that of the New York Times, but is only interested in giving ""more value to our paying customers."

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-20 15:10

The holiday's over. After being available for free for the past 3 months thanks to a sponsorship deal from Channel 4, The Guardian is set to start charging for its iPad app.

Starting this Friday, current users will be asked to pay £9.99 a month for the app. Not everyone will have to pay right away: new users will be given a seven day trial period before they face any fees, and print subscribers will get the app at no extra cost. But even with these offers, the charge is The Guardian's highest fee for any digital product. The paper's mobile app, by comparison, costs £2.99 for six months, £4.99 for a year and is free in the US.

In an article for Paid Content, Robert Andrews speculates that The Guardian could generate significant revenue if it manages to convert the same proportion of free users into paying subscribers on the iPad and it has done on the iPhone. Andrews writes that The Guardian may be able to convert 47,600 of its current 280,000 active monthly users into paying customers, which would produce £475,000 per month, before Apple takes its 30% cut.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-10 18:23

By now, most daily news publishers are making at least some attempt to make their content accessible on cell phones and tablets. But usually their strategies focus on "shovelware"--automatically repackaging content produced for the computer-based web, with scant consideration for how and why people use mobile devices.

In a recent interview, Luke Wroblewski (a top expert on mobile design and usability) explained why news publishers should start thinking "mobile first"--and how they can achieve that goal to get ahead of the next disruptive wave of media technology...

Continue reading on Knight Digital Media Center

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-21 17:33

Developing mobile apps and mobile websites is extremely complex due to multiple operating systems, which each run on different versions. Screen sizes vary from low resolution like 240x320 for some Android devices up to really high resolution for tablets like 1280x768 for the iPad 2. Then there are 1000+ APIs across each platform, different hardware configurations including touch screens, hardware keyboards and alternative key configurations.

Continue reading on StrategyEye

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-03 09:06

Cash registers should be whirring happily this holiday season with sales of Apple's iPad, Amazon's Kindle Fire and other computer tablets. If the wave of buyers behave anything like those who went before, they'll be spending a lot of time on their new gadgets following the news.

But how best to capture, and profit from, the latest digital phenomenon? Most news companies have placed their bets on building customized tablet applications.

Continue reading in the Los Angeles Times

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-02 09:10

by Yaron Galai

A few months ago I tweeted this: "If I were a publisher I would either: a) pull my app from the App Store or b) invest all available cash in Apple stock." The latter piece of advice was probably pretty solid, if not very practical -- Apple's stock has been performing like no other in recent history. But my former piece of advice for publishers - to pull their apps from the App Store - doesn't seem to have resonated much, as many publishers keep pushing out their respective iPhone and iPad apps.

Continue reading on GigaOm

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-09-27 09:06

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