Date

Thu - 24.04.2014


Newsrooms and Journalism

Concentration and Politics Hinder Israel Newspapers, The New York Times

As one of Israel’s mainstream newspapers (Maariv) appears on the verge of closing, and another (Haaretz) faces strikes protesting its plans to lay off employees, The New York Times looked at the crisis in the country’s print media. The market has been skewed by the free national daily, Israel Hayom, introduced five years ago by a pro-government American billionaire, but the article provides an interesting summary of some of the challenges encountered by media in small-language markets.

Newspaper journalism is in crisis, The Guardian

“I loved the idea that, while I walked and talked and learned who I was, while I grew and even while I slept, great journalists were establishing the first draft of history,” writes John Tiffany in this fervent tale of his relationship with newspapers over the years. Tiffany, associate director of the National Theatre of Scotland, has put together a play, Enquirer, which aims to address the question “Are we seeing the dying days of the newspaper industry?”

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-10-08 19:03

The Guardian and Tumblr will ‘live-GIF’ first presidential debate, Poynter.org / Journalism.co.uk

A Guardian reporter and four GIF-creators will be getting together tomorrow to live-blog with animated GIFs, offering a light alternative to other coverage, this article says. Will these become a common element in live blogs as technology becomes more and more sophisticated? As another Poynter article explains: More compelling than a static photo and more immediate than Web video, the animated GIF (correctly pronounced with a soft g) is a uniquely digital mode of conveying ideas and emotion.”

The New York Times debuts an HTML5 iPad web app to complement its native apps, Nieman Lab

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-10-02 18:53

Shrewd print and online strategies have helped New York magazine to defy the global downturn in magazine and newspaper market. In an article published by AdAge, Matthew Flamm writes that the magazine has experienced its best year in a decade, and it’s not hard to understand why. 2012 has seen the title win a flurry of awards, expand its online presence and attract national and international audiences.

It’s a story that sits at odds with the fortunes of the American magazine industry in general. The Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC) reported a 10 percent decrease in magazine newsstand sales and a month ago the Publishers Information Bureau revealed that advertising has suffered an 8.8 percent year-on-year drop. Newsweek’s financial crisis may be the most extreme example of a magazine in decline, but other major magazine brands at Condé Nast, Time Inc. and others are suffering from loss of ad and circulation revenue.

So how exactly has this supposedly regional magazine managed to boost revenues and attract 4.8 million unique online users in August alone?

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-28 17:59

From France comes the mildly surprising news that Le Huffington Post has become the country’s premier online-only news source.

Figures released this morning by Médiamétrique/Netratings show that the site received 1.916 million unique visitors in July 2012, beating Rue 89 (1.476m unique users), one of France’s most popular websites, into second place. The rest of the rankings see Le Nouvel Observateur’s site Le Plus in third place (1.262m), Atlantico (1.258m) in fourth, fifth place taken by Slate France (966,000) and paying site Médiapart comes sixth with 578,000 unique visitors.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-27 18:21

If reports in this morning’s Daily Telegraph are accurate, News International’s frosty relationship with Google may be thawing.

After two self-imposed years in the wilderness, quality news titles owned by Rupert Murdoch’s British publishing division could find themselves re-included in Google search results as soon as next month.

The Times and The Sunday Times websites were originally removed from Google’s search index at the same time that paywalls were introduced at the thetimes.co.uk (then timesonline.co.uk), as part of News Int.’s attempts to stop users accessing content for free. Murdoch’s objection to consumers viewing premium content free of charge is no secret, and the media mogul hasn’t pulled any punches in his criticisms of Google’s operating policies.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-26 15:19

Hotly anticipated by the news media industry since it was first proposed as a rival for The Economist and The Financial Times, Atlantic Media’s new online business magazine Quartz finally went live yesterday. The launch was always going to be a closely scrutinised affair thanks to Quartz’s mobile-first, digital-only direction, and journalists have been quick to highlight the publication’s decision to shun native apps in favour of an app-like site.

A simple, uncluttered homepage greets visitors to qz.com. Rejecting the much-adhered-to practice of producing news website layouts that resemble newspaper front pages, Quartz features a single story on its main page with a bar on the left side of the screen that leads readers to "top," "latest" and "popular" stories. The navigation bar at the top of the screen is, as promised, categorised according to "phenomena," "not beats."

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-25 18:21

Arthur Brisbane, the former Public Editor of The New York Times, offers his thoughts and impressions on that job in an exit interview with Craig Silverman on Poynter.

On Nieman Lab, Andrew Phelps offers a first look at Spundge, a new "software to help journalists to manage real-time data streams."

The US-based Star-Tribune reports it is launching a new product this week called Radius, which offers "a new array of digital marketing services to small- and medium-sized businesses, many of whom have never advertised with the traditional newspaper."

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-24 18:40

Two weeks ago when the SFN blog examined the National Readership Survey (NRS)’s report on print and online news consumption, we suggested that encouraging digital figures for quality titles could be of great interest to advertisers. Looking at the same figures, The Guardian’s Investigations Executive Editor, David Leigh, had an altogether more radical idea: a £2 pound levy on broadband services.

Thanks to the BBC’s free-to-access, taxpayer-funded news website, British news consumers will always have access to reliable, up-to-date news reports. This, Leigh argues, means that the paywall model will “never really work in the UK context.” 

The noted investigative journalist reasons, in an article posted to MediaGuardian, that the simplest and most effective means of solving the financial dilemma faced by British news publishers is a “small levy on UK broadband providers [that] could be distributed to news providers in proportion to their UK online readership.” Brits are not particularly inclined to pay for online news, Leigh continues, but almost 20 million UK households are, and will continue to be, willing to pay for essential broadband subscriptions.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-24 17:01

Pubblico, the independent Italian newspaper that launched on Tuesday, is off to a flying start. According to news website Lettera 43, the paper sold 50,000 copies of its first issue. Pubblico’s founder, journalist Luca Telese, has hailed this initial success as a victory over sceptics who thought a print-based venture was destined for failure.

On Poynter, journalism educator Kelly Fincham offers advice on "What every young journalist should know about using Twitter."

"We access news on multiple devices. Shouldn’t those devices be smart enough to connect our actions to their presentation?" Analyst Ken Doctor discusses "all-access delight" in his latest newsonomics post on Nieman Lab.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-21 19:07

As Google News prepares to celebrate its tenth birthday on 22 September, the aggregation site could find that it finally has friends in the world of journalism willing to R.S.V.P.

From the moment the search engine giant launched its news service in 2002, Google News has found itself embroiled in bitter feuds with journalists and news outlets concerned that the internet company would siphon-off readers and make money on the back of ‘stolen’ content.

Using a sophisticated algorithm to ‘harvest’ stories from 4,000 international news sites, the original incarnation of Google News produced a constantly updated index of breaking news headlines from around the world. Today the ‘Googlebot’ aggregates stories from over 50,000 news sources and is frequently the first port of call for readers chasing a particular news item or wanting a global news perspective concentrated in one location. Unveiling the Google News project for the first time, then-Google product manager Marissa Meyer announced: “From the reader perspective, this changes news reading habits, because (usually) you pick a source and pick the story that interests you. With this service, you pick the story that interests you and then pick the source.”

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-21 18:13

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