WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Sat - 30.08.2014


Print Data

Many news publishing related trends built up speed and began taking hold in 2010, and are worth watching and considering further in 2011.

In no particular order, those trends are:

Coupons and daily deals

Leading the pack in 2010 was Chicago-based Internet coupon service Groupon Inc., which turned down a US$6 billion buyout offer from Google in early December and secured $500 million (of $950 million) at the end of the month.

Publishers around the globe are trying out Groupon-like daily deals as a way to engage readers, and are beginning to see success.

Social networking

If 2009 was the year your mom joined Facebook, then 2010 was the year everyone else did, from your grandfather to your 12-year-old niece.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-31 23:07

The oldest newspaper in Indiana will begin delivering in the mornings instead of later in the day, and will also close its Monday edition in order to publish on Saturdays instead, The Associated Press reported today.

The changes at the Vincennes Sun-Commercial will begin Dec. 11, and were implemented because readers and advertisers prefer getting their news earlier in the day, as well as having an edition on Saturday, publisher Rob Eilts said.

The newspaper already publishes a Sunday edition, and will be able to offer readers coverage of Friday night sports the first thing Saturday morning, Editor Gayle Robbins told the AP in an article published by the Chicago Tribune.

The newspaper's online edition has a closed paywall. When readers click on a headline, they are directed to a login page or asked to select a subscription service: US$1 per day, $5.70 per month, $17.10 for three months, $34.20 for six months and $68.40 for a year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-29 22:22

Most U.S. adults think printed media is easier to read than its digital equivalent, but they also prefer immediacy that can only be offered by using digital media, a survey by Harris Interactive has found.

"You can exchange a dozen emails in the time it takes to find a stamp for your snail mail, but a handwritten birthday card in your mailbox somehow means more than an identically worded email in your inbox," Nader Alaghband, founder and CEO, of Earthtone, which funded the study, stated in a press release. "Simply put, we choose new, digital media where it adds value and we opt for traditional media when that's what's best for us."

Image: Green Panthers

Fifty-eight percent of adults said they think a paperless office isn't going to happen in the near future, and 64 percent said they prefer to read something in print than on a computer screen, according to the press release, posted by Editor & Publisher.

Earthtone provides e-commerce solutions to the Internet printing sector.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-03 23:00

Although two thirds of Americans prefer to get their news from newspapers and TV, 55 percent believe that traditional media "will not longer exist in ten years," according to a Harris poll conducted for 24/7 Wall St. website, Editor & Publisher revealed on Friday.

However, 81 percent said there "will always be" a need for print newspapers despite the decline of traditional print outlets. Yet, 46 percent get their news from local TV networks while only 31 percent turns their attention towards local dailies, the survey showed.

Photo: Getty Images via The Independent

Twenty-five percent of Americans acknowledged that they are spending less time reading newspapers and magazines, "while in comparison 28 per cent said the time they spend visiting online news sites has increased," Journalism.co.uk reported. Overall, 50 percent get "almost all" their news from the Internet.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-01 15:04

The four largest newspapers in Spain--El Paí­s, El Mundo, ABC and La Razón-- eliminated 906 work positions between 2003 and 2009, PRNoticias reported yesterday. These layoffs represent 39 percent of the 2,325 staff members the dailies had seven years ago.

El Pais, which continues to be the largest employer, has reduced its payroll by 43 percent from 891 employees to 507. According to PRNoticias, the reduction does not mean that all the jobs have been lost because the Prisa Group transferred some of the newspaper's divisions to other parts of the company.

However, the steeper reduction was introduced by ABC, which cut by half its personnel from 774 to 375 staff members. El Mundo also has less staff as it reduced its staff by 35 percent from 446 people.

PRNoticias revealed that La Razon is the only newspaper that managed to increase its work positions since 2003. Now, it has 247 employees on its payroll, up from the 214 it had seven years ago.

According to the 2010 Report of the Journalistic Profession, released last week by Universidad de Malaga, 6,500 Spanish journalists are currently unemployed and the number is expected to increase to almost 10,000 by end of 2010, Xornal de Galicia reported.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-13 19:54

Dailies still remain a "vital source of news, information and entertainment for consumers in seven of Canada's largest and most competitive markets," according to the latest NADbank Readership Study, released by Newspaper Audience Databank, principal research arm of the Canadian daily newspaper industry.

The study, conducted from fall 2009 to spring 2010 in markets including million-plus markets, such as Toronto, Montréal, Vancouver, Ottawa-Gatineau, Calgary, Edmonton, as well as Halifax, found that readership of daily papers, either print editions or web sites, remain stable in all these markets, Editor & Publisher reported.

Among the million-plus markets, 76 percent of people in Toronto over 18 read either a daily newspaper in print or online each week. The figures were even higher in other markets: 77 percent in Montréal, 78 percent in Calgary and Edmonton, and 79 percent in Vancouver and Ottawa-Gatineau.

Online readership reached 30 percent in Ottawa-Gatineau, followed by 25 percent in Toronto and Calgary.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-10-08 23:47

As publishers struggle to create new business models, Spanish newspapers saw their revenue go down in 2009 to €2.048 million, 14.1 percent less than the €2.357 million gained in 2008, according to 2010 Digital Content Industry Report published by Asimelec, PRNoticias.com revealed today.

The highest decline was reported on ad revenue, which declined 24 percent from €1.112 million to €834 million. Although newspaper sales went down by 5.6 percent, the loss was offset by an increase in the cover price, the report explained. However, an increase of 4.2 percent in online advertising generated revenues of €297.7 million.

For the first time since 2003, newspaper penetration in Spain is below 40 percent. According to the report, the number of readers declined from 16.1 million in 2008 to 15.7 in 2009.

The newspapers market was not the only one to suffer losses. The survey showed that, for the first time in five years, cable television reported revenues declines because of the increase of online television, AND.es revealed. Overall, el 25.2 percent of the Spanish population watches TV contents on the web.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-05 20:31

After media buyers and advertisers said they did not want rolling averages of circulation data each month, newspaper publishers are now being pressured by the Media Federation of Australia (MFA) to disclose individual weekday sales figures, The Australian reported today.

Currently, newspaper publishers release data each quarter. Publishers had put forth a plan in which they would release two audited bi-yearly statements, in addition to 13-week average sales figures that would be released each month. This alternative proposal, among others issued by publishers "do not address key concerns raised by our members," which include top media buying agencies, the MFA stated in a letter to the country's four largest publishers.
"Averages don't work," Carol Morris, executive director of the MFA, told The Australian. "We do want to know how Monday performs compared with Thursday. If Julia Gillard overthrows Kevin Rudd, what happens to the circulation of newspapers?"

Newspaper publishers will meet with the MFA on Sept. 6, she said.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-08-16 21:15

Americans' confidence in newspapers remains low, as only a quarter of the population says it trusts the press, a Gallup poll revealed on Friday.

Yet the greatest confidence (49 percent) comes from people between 18 and 29 years old, "the same demographic often blamed for the precipitous decline in U.S. dailies' subscription rates," Agence France Press pointed out. Nonetheless, the newspaper industry is not the only media field experiencing low confidence. According to the poll, 78 percent distrust television news.

The survey, which annually measures confidence in 16 U.S. institutions, found that trust declines as Americans get older, hitting its lowest level in the group between 30 and 49 years, with a 16 percent of confidence. Gallup explained this tendency by saying that young people place more trust in institutions in general, AFP noted. Trust in media, which has been declining since 2003, is now similar to the one Americans have in banks (23 percent) and much better than Congress (11 percent).

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-08-16 17:06

An analyst for a big Australian-based investment bank suggested that Fairfax Media Ltd. could gain its earnings by shutting down the print editions of The Sydney Morning Herald and Melbourne's The Age and focusing on e-readers and online, The National Business Review reported.

According to the report from Macquarie, Australia's biggest investment bank, dropping print editions and delivering content via e-readers could "boost earnings from the two papers to A$55 million - $5 million more than the bank's 2010 forecast, the Australian reported.

Analyst Alex Pollak said Fairfax could "get the ball rolling by spending about $50 million to give away 100,000 e-readers to seed the migration of readers away from print."

"The point is such a move is likely, but not in its entirety on day one -- a seismic structural shift like this will take time for Fairfax to convince both advertisers and consumers alike of its merits," he added.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-08-06 00:43

Syndicate content

© 2014 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation