WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Mon - 22.12.2014


Printing and Production

THE concept of outsourcing has been a popular business strategy for almost three decades.

It's not new to newspapers, or banks, government, insurance institutions, telecommunications companies, software developers, research firms and many other enterprises across the economy.

The decision by Fairfax Media to outsource editorial production at The Age and Sydney Morning Herald has put renewed focus outsourcing.

Continue reading on the PANPA site

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-06-16 17:07

by Kevin Anderson

There was an interesting discussion about linking and journalism amongst a number of journalists in North America. Mathew Ingram of GigaOm and Alex Byers, a web producer for Politico in Washington, both collected the conversation using Storify. It covers a lot of well worn territory in this debate, and I'm not going to rehash it.

Continue reading on Strange Attractor

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-20 11:13

A pioneering new eco-font for newspapers - believed to be the first of its kind in the country - which cuts down on ink but does not alter quality, has been developed by specialists at regional media company Archant.

Continue reading on InPublishing

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-04 09:34

The Bangkok Post just wasn't getting value from its in-house IT department. There were 25 people on staff, costs were increasing, and the in-house skills were behind the industry standards.

"IT itself just wasn't supporting the business," says Pichai Chuensuksawadi, Editor-in-Chief of the Bangkok Post, during Publish Asia 2011, being held in Bangkok from 27 to 29 April.

"It wasn't supporting the advertising department so they could do their job. When there were problems in editorial, they were slow to respond, they had a wait-and-see attitude."

Anthony Arundell, Director of Eastern Tech Service, says outsourcing isn't a one-size-fits all proposition - every company has to manage its own needs.

In the case of the post, it was a three-step process: first assess the current environment, the second was the establish a strategy, and the third was to draw up a road map of expectations.

"Outsourcing is like a marriage - we go to bed together, we wake up together," says Mr Arundell. "There has to be trust in the relationship, it's a long-term relationship."

Some of their lessons:
- The service level agreement is a critical driver of change - it has to be based on business objectives, not IT objectives.
- The process needs to be measured daily.
- The IT company must understand the news business - that it works on deadlines and must produce news very quickly.
- Expect delays in the system - people don't want to change.

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-02 10:01

by Dean Roper

The Thompson family, owner of the Globe and Mail in Canada, turned many heads in the industry in 2008 when it signed a 1.7 billion-Canadian dollar deal with its printing partner Transcontinental to print the national daily until 2028.

"They believed that there was much more to come from print when everybody else, especially south of the border, was saying it was dead," says Phillip Crawley, CEO of the Globe and Mail. Mr. Crawley spoke at the WAN-IFRA Printing Summit 2011 Conference in Mainz, Germany.

Ever since that momentous day, Crawley says he etched the date of 1st October 2010 into the cortexes of Globe and Mail staff, the day the company would relaunch its newspaper in grand style.

At the core of the multi-platform launch was a completely redesigned newspaper, leveraging the capabilities of the new presses (KBA Commander CT triple-wides) that were bought and installed at Transcontinental, which has printed the Globe and Mail since 1995.

"The day those presses started up in October in Toronto was one of the most exciting days of my career," says Crawley.

With the relaunch, the Globe and Mail introduced new print products, especially for the weekend, such as Globe Life and Globe Style, incorporating different newsprint, glossy paper and covers, semi-commercial and more.

The results in six months since the launch are startling, he says:

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-07 17:20

by Dean Roper

When 85 percent of their revenues come from print, says Kasturi Balaji, Managing Director of Kasturi & Sons in India, newspapers had better not scrimp on offering the best newspaper products to their readers. Mr. Balaji spoke at the WAN-IFRA Printing Summit 2011 Conference in Mainz, Germany.

Based in Chennai, Kasturi & Sons are the publishers of The Hindu, an English-language daily newspaper with a circulation of 1.5 million copies, and Business Line with 180,000 circulation, among other titles.

The company prints at 15 print sites, 12 of them owned by Kasturi & Sons, and three use heatset technology to print newspaper titles. That is what sets the company apart.

Since 1998, Kasturi & Sons have printed most of their newspaper products on double-width presses, many equipped with hot-air dryers. The company offers a number of niche, high-quality semi-commercial products, all bringing in significant new revenue streams.

For that new revenue, there are press-related and mailroom issues to consider, Mr. Balaji says. For the press, quality, formats and enhancements play major roles. But warning about quality, he says, "It is important to be realistic about quality expectations. Adding a dryer to a newspaper press does not make it a commercial press. While it may be somewhat easier to retrofit devices like stitchers and gluers, the same cannot be said for hot-air dryers, for example."

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-07 17:02

The earthquake of magnitude 9.0 that hit at 14:46 on March 11 caused major difficulties for publishing newspapers the following morning of March 12. Tohoku, in northeastern Japan, bore the brunt of the recent devastating earthquake, the following tsunami and large-scale blackout after that.

Newspapers in Tohoku region were hard pressed to publish.

Continue reading on NSK News Bulletin Online

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-23 09:22

San Luis Obispo - In its continued effort to educate the best and brightest to enter the graphic communication industry and lead it in the future, Cal Poly's Graphic Communication Department has unveiled the Dow Jones & Company Web Printing Laboratory.

With heavy support from industry partners, the department has expanded its educational offerings in publication printing by doubling the page count and color capacity of its web publication press. The addition of four-units makes it an eight-unit web press.

Continue reading on What They Think?

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-03 11:02

Northern and Shell is apparently considering moving its whole operation from Lower Thames Street in central London to an industrial estate next to Luton airport.

The Richard Desmond-owned company declined to comment yesterday.

Continue reading on PressGazette

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-02-03 17:46

The Daily Mail & General Trust is to relocate its printing operation to a new greenfield site in Essex.

It would allow the company to upgrade its printing presses and, it says in a statement on its website today, "to reconfigure them more efficiently."

Continue reading on the Greenslade Blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-02-01 18:06

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