WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Wed - 17.09.2014


Web 2.0

Driving reader engagement and loyalty is a bigger motivator for increased use of user-generated content than gathering additional content, WAN-IFRA and Finnish crowdsourcing service Scoopshot found, in a survey of editors of regional and national dailies, local papers and online-only sites that use UGC.

All respondents rated reader engagement and loyalty as a primary driver for increased editorial use of UGC, ahead of 71% who said that the uniqueness of the content provided was a driver. Just 14% said that the lower cost of the content was a motivating factor.

Photos are the most commonly used content, according to the survey, with all respondents using them. Nearly all (87%) use story tips and half use videos. About one third cited comments as a way readers contribute which they see as UGC.

UGC is most relevant on a local level, the survey found. Three-quarters of respondents see UGC as particularly suitable for local or hyperlocal news, and just over half believe it is particularly suited to community events. Other coverage areas which more than one third of editors cited were ‘sports’ and ‘accidents’.

All believed that UGC can add value to a publication, and 81.3% said that they see the importance of UGC increasing at their publication. One participant commented that although it is seldom “very” valuable, there are times when it is. 

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-25 10:24

What do a YouTube video satirising Pakistan’s army, an article criticising the Polish Agency for Enterprise Development, and a video of a Canadian citizen peeing on his passport have in common? They were all the objects of government requests to remove content from Google sites during the second half of 2011, says Google.

The company has just released its latest round of data, documenting demands made by governments to remove content from its sites or to turn over information about its users. Google, which began publishing this data as part of its Transparency Report in 2010, expressed concern as it noted that, for the fifth six-month period in a row, it has received requests from governments to remove political content. What’s more, the demands didn’t just come from countries with a traditionally poor press freedom record, but from Western democracies too.

“Unfortunately, what we’ve seen over the past couple years has been troubling, and today is no different,” wrote Google’s Senior Policy Analyst Dorothy Chou in a blog post about the data. “It’s alarming not only because free expression is at risk, but because some of these requests come from countries you might not suspect—Western democracies not typically associated with censorship.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-18 16:22

Time Inc., the largest magazine company in the United States, has stopped resisting Apple. Striking a deal similar to that signed by its major competitors a year ago, the Time Warner-owned publisher agreed on Wednesday to sell subscriptions to all 20 of its titles, which include high-circulation weeklies such as Time, People and Sports Illustrated, through the Newsstand section of Apple’s iOS App Store.

The decision represents a considerable change of heart for a publisher that was “once the magazine industry’s most ardent opponent of selling subscriptions through Apple,” according to Amy Chozick of the New York Times.

Until now, Time Inc.’s readers have only been able to access single issues of the iPad editions of its magazines through the Newsstand app, with print subscribers alone receiving regular automatic uploads.

Time Inc.’s recalcitrance toward Apple since the launch of Newsstand last fall was motivated in part by the hard bargain that the technology giant drives with publishers. Beyond the profit share arrangement whereby Apple demands a contentious 30% commission on subscriptions purchased through its Newsstand, Apple’s previous unwillingness to share the personal information of iOS magazine subscribers with publishers was a deal-breaker for Time Inc.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-15 14:36

ICANN, the non-profit organisation responsible for controlling the Internet address system, has released the names of everyone who has applied for new domains, which have become available as part of a program designed to increase competition online.

ICANN writes that, although there are currently hundreds of country-specific domains being used, there are just 22 “generics” in operation, such as .com or .org.

This is changing now, as ICANN called for applications for new domains earlier this year. Reuters describes the initiative as a push to “break the near-monopoly of the .com top-level domain.”

When the chance to apply closed at the end of May, a total of 1,930 applications had been received. ICANN has now released the names of the bidders, which include several new organisations. As Poynter reports, the Guardian, the BBC, HBO and FOX are just some of the media companies that have applied for the new domains.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-14 18:54

Not content with a soon-to-be-launched video streaming network and a host of new European editions, the Huffington Post is releasing a new weekly iPad magazine tomorrow named “Huffington.

The New York Times previews the new publication, noting that some content will be pulled from huffingtonpost.com, but other articles will also be “new and separate from that of the rest of the site”. The magazine, which is only available though the Apple store, will feature a mix of long-form pieces (of between 4,000 and 8,000 words), photos, commentary, reviews, illustrations, videos and data visualisations.

“From the beginning we wanted to do something that felt like a print magazine," says Huffington’s creative director Josh Klenert (formerly of Billboard), quoted by Joe Pompeo at Capital New York.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-13 18:07

Lekiosk, a French iOS app that offers bundle deals on magazine subscriptions, makes its UK début today.

Michael Philippe, 25, one of the start-up’s quartet of young founders (the company's CEO, Ari Assuied, is the eldest at 33), said in an interview with WAN-IFRA this afternoon that publishers including the BBC, Condé Nast, IPC Media and Dennis had already signed on, giving British consumers an initial 100 titles to choose from, such as Vogue, Wired UK, and Marie Claire. “We’re fairly confident that by the end of the year we’ll have close to 200 titles on the platform,” he said, calling it “a very good start.”

The French app, originally called Lekiosque, has been downloaded half a million times since its launch in January 2011. The idea was born in 2007, while Philippe was still in university. Frustrated by his inability to get his hands on a copy of French magazine Le Point while doing an internship in New York, he called his brother and best friend in Paris, and they came up with the idea of reproducing a French newsstand anywhere in the world.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-11 18:48

In the digital age, are things looking good or gloomy for magazines? Economist brand platforms – which themselves represents a highly successful weekly magazine – argued both positions last week.

An article from The Economist’s print edition stated that magazine publishing has recently been suffused with a “new sense of optimism.” Most magazines rely less on classified advertising than newspapers, argues the piece, so they took less of a hit when the market moved online. They are capable of inspiring reader loyalty that is attractive to advertisers, continues the article, and they are harnessing digital technology in innovative ways.

The story acknowledges that the number of ad pages in US magazine has fallen for the third quarter running, but it asserts that digital advertising is an important growing market. “Once, digital ads would have been scant comfort. On the web they are typically worth a small fraction of what they were in print. But tablets, such as Apple’s iPad, could change this,” states the article, “there are signs that advertisers are accepting higher rates on tablets than on the web, because magazines on tablets are more like magazines in print: engrossing, well-designed experiences instead of forests of text and links.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-11 15:14

The New York Times: purveyor of “All The News That’s Fit To Print.” And now, all the news that’s fit to stream too?

A Nieman Lab reports, The Times has struck a licensing agreement with Hulu, making some of its video content available through the popular online streaming service. For the moment, the only Times video that is on offer with Hulu is a documentary about hockey named “Punched Out: The Life and Death of an N.H.L. Enforcer,” but Nieman Lab writes that more content is due to be uploaded soon.  

Author of the article Justin Ellis suggests that putting content on Hulu has both pros and cons for the Times. “On Hulu, a viewer may be more likely to seek a lean-back entertainment and watch a video longer than five minutes,” writes Ellis, “But by putting the videos on Hulu, the Times is also sending eyeballs off their property and adding an intermediary who’ll expect a cut of the ad revenue.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-04 17:07

NPR announced yesterday that has it hired the Chicago Tribune’s Brian Boyer to direct a new team, dedicated to building news applications. NPR has produced news apps previously, such as this interactive look at the science of “Fracking” to extract gas, and this map of air-polluting facilities in the US. However, the staff who have worked on these types of projects haven’t been coordinated in a single department, and Boyer’s appointment will bring them together.

Mark Stencel, NPR’s Managing Editor for digital news, who will be in charge of Boyer and his team, tells Poynter; “what I’m hoping is that, by taking these positions and putting them together as a team, we’ll be able to do a higher level of [work] than we’ve been able to do with scattered design, database and development resources.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-22 16:01

Last month, 300 media professionals gathered in London’s Science Museum to attend WAN-IFRA’s Digital Media Europe conference. Over three days, top executives shared their thoughts about how modern newspaper publishers can stay on the cutting edge of digital media.

Speakers included Arthur Sulzberger, Jr., Chairman and CEO of The New York Times Company and Andrew Miller, CEO of Guardian Media Group.

WAN-IFRA members can now download a full, executive summary of the conference here. Non-members can get an abbreviated version here for the “price” of a Tweet or a Facebook post.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-10 11:26

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