WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Sat - 01.11.2014


advertising revenue

News websites in the US and the UK racked up record traffic numbers in August, traditionally a slow month, according to a report on Poynter.

Advertising revenues continued to decline for US newspapers in the second quarter of this year. Erik Sass of MediaDailyNews reports that the latest figures from the Newspaper Association of America show total ad revenues dropped 6.4 percent to $5.6 billion in the second quarter of 2012 from $6 billion in the second quarter of 2011. "Print ad revenues fell 7.9 percent from $5.2 billion to $4.8 billion, while online ad revenue growth remained anemic with a 2.9 percent increase from $803 million to $827 million," Sass writes.

Does the Los Angeles Times qualify as a charity case? asks veteran blogger Alan D. Mutter, who examines the paper's recent $1 million gift from the Ford Foundation.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-06 17:37

France’s Union of the National Daily Press (SPQN) is taking a keen interest in a draft law, approved by Germany’s cabinet last week, which would require aggregators such as Google News that reproduce snippets of text from news articles to pay a copyright fee to publishers, reported Le Monde on Tuesday.

The German draft law, backed by major publishing houses Axel Springer and Bertelsmann, has been nicknamed the “Lex Google” in France. Initially put forth by the Federation of German News Publishers, its intention is to allow publishers to recover some of the advertising revenue that they say is lost to aggregators who reproduce “pirated” content from news organizations’ websites as teasers on their news pages.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-05 12:16

Back when WAN-IFRA was still FIEJ (the Fédération Internationale des Editeurs de Journaux et Publications), the organisation’s 1962 News Bulletin carried an article that showed that the vast majority of British newspapers relied on advertising, not reader-generated revenue, to cover production and distribution costs. "Quality" newspapers garnered 73 percent of their income from advertising, as opposed to sales and circulation revenue at weekly titles. It is a trend that dates from well before the 1960s and continues to the present day, in both the UK and the United States.

At least, it was a trend that continued until very recently. Now there are growing signs that the tide is at last turning. This week, the New York Times co., publisher of The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune and The Boston Globe released second quarter figures showing that its titles’ circulation-generated revenue was higher than advertising revenue. Although dwindling income from print and digital advertising (which shrank by 6.6 percent and stands at $220 million) undoubtedly contributed to the shift, the Times’ famous paywall and an increase in price for print subscriptions saw circulation revenue at the NYT company’s news titles rise by 8.3 percent, to $233 million.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-27 16:49

A healthy rise in online and mobile advertising revenue in 2012 and 2013 will more than compensate for the steep losses facing the traditional publishing sector, predicts a new report by Media buying network GroupM.

The group, which calls itself "the world's number one media investment management operation," estimates that Britain's overall advertising market will grow sluggishly this year and next, with only moderate help from the London Olympic Games.

Digital high jump

The UK is recognized as a world leader in digital ad spending as a percent of total media, and the upward trend looks set to continue into 2013, according to GroupM futures director Adam Smith. “Digital spending growth already represents a quarter of the entire UK marketing economy, and it continues to grow,” he said on the GroupM website.

The report predicts that digital advertising spending will jump by 11 percent between this year and next, surpassing £5.3 billion ($8.3 billion) by the end of 2012, and reaching £6 billion ($9.4 billion) in 2013.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-03 15:42

US newspaper companies aren’t off to a great start this fiscal year, with both Lee Enterprises and Gannett Co. reporting large quarterly losses.

Lee revealed that the company lost $26.6 million for the second fiscal quarter ending March 25, or the equivalent of 54 cents lost per share, The Washington Post reported. Last year at this time, Lee reported a loss of $1.3 million, or 3 cents per share.

The vast losses can be contributed to refinancing and reorganization costs, according to a press release. Taking those costs out of the equation, the adjusted loss was 3 cents per share, the press release said.

Operating revenue decreased by 3.6% to $172.3 million, the press release said. While combined print and digital advertising revenue fell 5.3%, digital ad revenue rose by 9.9%.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-18 12:24

According to a new report released by the Internet Advertising Bureau and PricewaterhouseCoopers, mobile advertising spending in the UK increased by 157% from 2010 to 2011, The Guardian reported. Spending climbed from £83 million in 2010 to £203 million in 2011, the article said.

Mark Sweney of The Guardian attributes the rise in spending to the increased popularity of 3G and Wi-Fi, as well as the use of targeted advertising through mobile.

According to the article, the report also found that display advertising had the highest percentage increase, up 186% from 2010. Display advertising has risen drastically since 2008, the year mobile apps became widely available, and mobile search advertising has also increased by 145%, the article said.

Mobile Marketing reported last year that mobile ad spending in the UK doubled from 2009 to 2010, including vast increases in mobile search advertising and display advertising.

As we previously reported, a 2011 comScore study showed the UK had the highest percentage of news website traffic from mobile devices.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-20 18:31

The Newspaper Association of America reported a 7.3% loss in combined print and online advertising in 2011, according to Poynter.

The NAA listed $20.692 billion in yearly advertising revenue for print newspapers, a 9.2% drop from 2010, and $3.249 billion in ad revenue for online newspapers, a 6.8% increase from last year.

Adding $10 billion for circulation revenue, which the NAA does not report, Rick Edmonds of Poynter approximated newspapers to be a $34 billion industry. Edmonds noted Google’s yearly revenue, $37.9 billion, to demonstrate the dire state of the newspaper industry.

Online newspapers also had a particularly weak fourth quarter with only 3.1% growth in ad revenue, compared to growth reported during the first three quarters of 2011.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-16 13:35

The Independent News & Media chief executive, Gavin O'Reilly, on Tuesday warned that advertising revenues will remain flat this year, as the publisher announced plans for a major expansion of its Irish internet business.

INM reported increased operating profits for the year ending December 2010, during which it sold its loss-making UK papers the Independent and Independent on Sunday to Alexander Lebedev.

Continue reading on Media Guardian

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-23 09:02

You may have come across the chart-making work of blogger Michael DeGusta last month, when he recrunched some numbers on the music business that illustrated that industry's financial decline. And now he's cast his axis-loving eyes upon the newspaper business and, in particular, the Newspaper Association of America's release last week of 2010 advertising revenue numbers.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-03-22 17:19

In the United Kingdom, outdoor may be the most useful ad format for advertising newspapers and magazines, according to Sally Dickerson, global director for marketing firm Brand Science, according to Brand Republic. Print ads may be the most advantageous to FMCG (Fast Moving Consumer Goods) and telecommunications advertisers.

For newspapers and magazines, outdoor generated £1.29 of incremental sales per £1 of media and production cost. TV is less efficient, offering £0.77. Print and radio both generate £0.50 while Internet £0.39.

Image: The Observer

Print produces £1.47 of incremental sales revenue per £1 of media and production charges for FMCG advertisers. Meanwhile, outdoor gathers £1.09, radio £0.89 and Internet £0.66, Brand Republic wrote Monday.

Brand Science analysis also found that print was the most efficient format for telecom firms since incremental sales amounted to £11.31 for each £1 of media and production charges, Marketing Media Review divulged.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-17 18:29

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