Date

Thu - 24.04.2014


aggregation

As Google News prepares to celebrate its tenth birthday on 22 September, the aggregation site could find that it finally has friends in the world of journalism willing to R.S.V.P.

From the moment the search engine giant launched its news service in 2002, Google News has found itself embroiled in bitter feuds with journalists and news outlets concerned that the internet company would siphon-off readers and make money on the back of ‘stolen’ content.

Using a sophisticated algorithm to ‘harvest’ stories from 4,000 international news sites, the original incarnation of Google News produced a constantly updated index of breaking news headlines from around the world. Today the ‘Googlebot’ aggregates stories from over 50,000 news sources and is frequently the first port of call for readers chasing a particular news item or wanting a global news perspective concentrated in one location. Unveiling the Google News project for the first time, then-Google product manager Marissa Meyer announced: “From the reader perspective, this changes news reading habits, because (usually) you pick a source and pick the story that interests you. With this service, you pick the story that interests you and then pick the source.”

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-21 18:13

France’s Union of the National Daily Press (SPQN) is taking a keen interest in a draft law, approved by Germany’s cabinet last week, which would require aggregators such as Google News that reproduce snippets of text from news articles to pay a copyright fee to publishers, reported Le Monde on Tuesday.

The German draft law, backed by major publishing houses Axel Springer and Bertelsmann, has been nicknamed the “Lex Google” in France. Initially put forth by the Federation of German News Publishers, its intention is to allow publishers to recover some of the advertising revenue that they say is lost to aggregators who reproduce “pirated” content from news organizations’ websites as teasers on their news pages.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-05 13:16

The Newsblaster project was developed by the Columbia NLP (natural language processing) Group and has been running since September 2001. Under the direction of Professor Kathleen McKeown, the site processes news stories through the application of natural language processing techniques and artificial intelligence, to produce summaries of the day’s top news stories. After 11 years at the helm, Professor McKeown spoke to the SFN blog to discuss the development of Newsblaster, and what the future holds for the aggregation site.

SFN: In the 11 years that Newsblaster has been running, what types of changes has the site undergone?

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-29 10:53

After launching less than a year and a half ago, paid digital content service Ongo is shutting down. The company, which aggregates news from around 40 publishers, presents it in a user-friendly, add-free format, and charges readers a subscription for it, will shut shop by the end of this month, reported Nieman Lab yesterday.

Ongo’s closure represents a bad bet made by some of the traditional news industry’s biggest players: The New York Times, Gannett and The Washington Post each contributed $4m to the company when it was launched.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-09 15:11

by Julie Moos

Aggregation has been core to this website's success for the last decade. Our most popular feature since 1999 has been a blog that earns its iconic place in journalism by highlighting the most interesting and important news for a passionate audience. (In case you haven't caught on, that blog is Romenesko.)

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-14 18:38

Media have changed in ways that now make aggregation essential to the mission of almost any news organization.

Readers face an abundant and growing volume of news and news sources. Most cities now have independent news websites, forums and blogs covering neighborhoods and particular topics. Other professional news outlets are stepping up their output.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-01 10:21

PARIS -- As news organizations around the world close down foreign bureaus, journalists, entrepreneurs and even government bodies in Europe are creating news ventures to try to fill the void.

As a result, readers seeking international news are increasingly spoiled for choice -- especially if they read English, the common second language of many Europeans and the favored tongue for many of the new outlets.

Continue reading in The New York Times

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-09 18:19

by Matt DeRienzo

We're adding a full-time curator position at The Register Citizen.

Jenny Golfin, whose duties have included morning shift web updating, social media management and reporting, will be devoted full-time to this new role. Her mission will be to provide our audience with links to breaking and comprehensive news and information relevant to their community and interests.

Continue reading on NewspaperTurnaround.Com

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-26 11:45

by Mike Masnick

A few weeks ago, when the NYTimes' Bill Keller bizarrely compared Arianna Huffington to a Somali pirate, we noted that journalism is a form of aggregation as well. After all, you're taking content from the people who actually make news, and aggregating it into a publication. It appears that others are catching on to this as well. A bunch of folks have passed along this blog post from the Zunguzungu blog, which notes that journalists are aggregating too.

Continue reading on Techdirt

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-14 10:53

U.S. News Media Group, which publishes the monthly U.S. News and World Report, is launching a series of real-time news feeds in collaboration with content aggregator Loud3r, paidContent.org reported today.

Using Loud3r's online search technology, the news group aims to complement its original reporting with relevant content on a myriad issues from around the Web for its readers, according to the press release published on ITNewsOnline.com. This new content channel will give editors the tools to discover and curate fresh, relevant content

"Users' expectation in the Internet age is for breadth and depth, and the traditional news organ needs to apply technology to get there because there are some tasks that are impossible for a human staff to cover," Lowell Goss, CEO at Loud3r, told paidContent. "The world expects every possible article that there might be on a particular news item."

For example, using Congress Tracker, its first real time news feed on top political issues, featuring updated profiles of all 435 members of Congress, the channel will serve as a template for all future content channels of the group, according to paidContent. Goss further added: "Aggregation doesn't only free up the newsroom, it can serve as inspiration for reporters and editors."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-10 23:11

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