WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Sat - 01.11.2014


Amazon

It’s official: Penguin and Random House are betrothed, their parent companies Pearson and Bertelsmann announced today.

As is often the case with arranged marriages, it is hoped that this union will allow the two houses to consolidate their power: together, the book publishers are expected to control over one quarter of the U.S. and British markets, and to generate approximately £2.5 billion (or $4 billion) in annual revenue.

And as with so many weddings these days, theirs is “subject to regulatory approval;” if all goes well, they will likely tie the knot in the latter half of 2013.

The idea of huddling together was no doubt influenced by the increasing need for publishers to puff out their chests against retailing giant Amazon, which has cornered 90 percent of the UK ebook market, and nearly 40 percent of the market for all books, according to Quartz.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-29 18:24

Today, Apple CEO Tim Cook is expected to show the world the iPad’s mini me, following (as ever) months of hypothesising and (for once) the competition: Amazon and Google have already achieved success in the tiny tablet market with their Kindle Fire and Nexus 7 devices.

The Apple keynote will take place at 10 am PST in San José, California. “We have a little more to show you,” read the invitations, sent one week ago, seemingly substantiating the speculation that has been ricocheting across the web at least since February, when “the first credible rumour” of a mini iPad came from the Wall Street Journal. Taking place at the California Theatre, the unveiling event will likely be modest relative to Microsoft’s “no-expenses-spared” launch of its Surface tablet in New York, scheduled for Thursday, October 25.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-23 15:53

Next year will be the year that the big technology companies go after local publishing and broadcasting businesses more fiercely than ever before. Most local media companies have no idea what's about to hit them - much less a plan to respond.

Google already has feet on the street from Portland to New York City to sell search advertising and directory listings to small and medium business (SMBs).

Continue reading on Reflections of a Newsosaur

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-15 08:58

Amazon presented today the update for its Kindle for Android app, allowing readers to access more than 100 and magazines, Editor & Publisher revealed.

"Amazon has long offered access to newspaper and magazine content via its Kindle hardware devices, but this is the first time that functionality has been extended to third-party gadgets," explained Mashable.

The new app includes publications likes The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Economist and Reader's Digest, according to Amazon. Users can purchase single copies or subscribe content.

It also allows readers to share books, zoom in images and download recent issues of the publications they subscribe to.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-12-17 22:15

Amazon announced on Monday that it would give publishers as much as 70 percent of the revenues it collects from selling newspapers and magazines through its Kindle store, The New York Times reported.

The royalty increase will take effect on December 1 and will be calculated on the retail price minus the delivery costs, The Associated Press reported. However, to qualify for it, "publications must be able to be read on all Kindle devices and applications built for devices such as Apple's iPhone and the Blackberry," Agence France-Presse explained.

Image: Pulse 2

"A newspaper that delivers about 9 megabytes of content a month would pay about $1.35 in delivery costs, meaning a $9.99-per-month subscription would net a publisher $6.05 a month per subscription," according to the company, the AP reported.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-09 17:16

Being able to buy an issue or subscription on one device, and then access it across devices makes sense for device and app users. And, for the most part, it also makes sense for the makers of gadgets - Apple, Amazon, and others. However, it doesn't make sense for publishers looking to sell their own multi-platform subscriptions, paidContent's Staci Kramer wrote yesterday.

It is in the publisher's best interest to control their customer relationships and their brands across devices. Amazon announced its vision is to allow customers to "buy once, read everywhere" - a stance that could lead to content creators locking horns with device-makers.

Image via Melville House Publishing

For example, Kramer writes: "The NYT has invested considerable resources in an iPad app that eventually will be part of its metered plans. Selling subscriptions on the Kindle or Nook makes sense. Selling one that works on an iPad and competes with that, not so much."

Amazon has also said that in the future, it will allow users to lend e-books on the Kindle for 14 days, depending on the publisher's discretion, Retail Digital reported today.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-26 23:58

The Washington Post Company owned-Newsweek.com is joining the increasing number of news publishers experimenting with cloud computing. The weekly magazine is outsourcing its Web site hosting duties to Amazon, MediaWeek reported.

Having incurred US$29.3 million operating losses in 2009, the move of shifting its hosting operations to an external host is aimed at cutting loses in its magazine division, thereby hoping to save approximately $500,000 annually.
"It saves Newsweek money," Geoff Reiss, vice-president and general manager of Newsweek Digital, told MediaWeek. "Lots of people out there built their own infrastructure and are going to be tortured by this idea of sunk costs."

Newsweek.com also underwent a redesign this week, moving to a more simple, stripped-down look, while avoiding standard media site design features like large ad units and branding statements.

"A clean, vertical orientation on the page was one of the goals. What we've seen come out of social media and blogs [is] an organization that makes sense for how people are consuming media now...brand doesn't trump user experience," Reiss told MediaWeek.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-30 21:33

InformationWeek divulged Thursday that Amazon may have acquired Touchco, a touchscreen technology manufacturer. According to a New York Times (NYT) article from Wednesday "a person briefed on the deal" revealed that Amazon would be combining the manufacturer's technology and staff members into its California-based hardware division Lab126.

The acquisition was reportedly a step to boost Kindle's touch screen mechanism in light of the launch of Apple's new device iPad, said the Wall Street Journal. The iPad is thought to be better than Kindle because it has a more colourful screen and is easier to navigate.

Touchco uses "interpolating force-sensitive resistance" technology that is placed into display screens, pointed out NYT. The technology could be entirely transparent and could cost as little as US$10 per square foot. Capacitive touchscreens used in the iPad and iPhone are relatively more pricey and cannot detect a limitless amount of simultaneous touch points.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-02-04 15:31

Amazon received a pleasant surprise this Christmas; "for the first time ever" consumers bought more Kindle editions of books than physical books, MSNBC reported yesterday. However, PC World's Jeff Bertolucci suggested that as the e-reader landscape is expected to change next year as other e-readers are launched, such as the expected unveiling of Apple's tablet computer, there are steps Amazon can take to prevent the Kindle device from becoming outdated.

One possible transformation is the addition of a colour screen, which would largely benefit magazines and newspapers, Bertolucci wrote. E-Ink displays are alright for books, but Kindle may have to swap it "to appease its news publishing partners." Another change could be dropping the physical keyboard since a touchscreen may be enough for "limited text-entry tasks" and the extra space could be used to enlarge the display.

Bertolucci also mentioned a potentially less restrictive DRM (Digital Rights Management) policy that could attract more consumers, which may be skeptical towards acquiring digital books linked to a constrained number of e-readers. Kindle DX could be redesigned to become a tablet computer with attributes like a colour touchscreen as well as advanced browsing and media-playback features.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2009-12-29 15:19

Sony Corp.'s e-reader will begin offering an exclusive digital version of two News Corp.-owned properties, the financial news service Marketwatch.com and the New York Post, a tabloid, the Japanese company announced today.

A digital version of the Wall Street Journal, also owned by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp., is already available on Amazon's Kindle; however, Sony will offer an exclusive daily news update after the markets close, called Wall Street Journal Plus, Agence France Presse reported.

Photo: The New York Times blogs
It's well known that Murdoch has criticised the Kindle, saying Amazon takes more than its share of subscription fees. It has been speculated that News Corp. may walk away from Kindle completely, "but the new 'exclusive agreement for automatic updates on Sony readers appears to be the best counter the company could muster," a BusinessWeek report stated today. On the Kindle, users must manually download the newspaper each morning.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-17 23:19

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