Date

Thu - 24.04.2014


Apps

"One of the legacies of Steve Jobs is that he's taught us to pay for content," says Adam Bird, director, McKinsey & Company, speaking of the late Apple founder in a presentation on how consumers behave with new technologies.

When it comes to paid-for apps, books, news and magazines are doing quite well, he says. Speaking at a World Newspaper Congress session dedicated to technology, Bird focuses on how consumers are interacting with the new devices.

"If we start to think about technology in general, the only real certainty is that we are going to have more technology," he says. "The sheer volume and pace of change is phenomenal. E-mails per second are up to 2.9 million. There are 20 hours of content uploaded to YouTube per minute. The sheer scale of this is absolutely phenomenal."

What's changing the most? Bird suggests looking at mobile developments as they become more social, more video, more local.

"If we look at it in terms of mobile, if we isolate one thing that will happen, it is that every phone will become a smartphone, and it is absolutely changing how people are using them," he says. "It's almost used for everything but voice communication; we're certainly seeing that trend accelerating. Mobile is becoming a serious advertising platform as well."

Author

Larry Kilman's picture

Larry Kilman

Date

2011-10-18 12:03

by Yaron Galai

A few months ago I tweeted this: "If I were a publisher I would either: a) pull my app from the App Store or b) invest all available cash in Apple stock." The latter piece of advice was probably pretty solid, if not very practical -- Apple's stock has been performing like no other in recent history. But my former piece of advice for publishers - to pull their apps from the App Store - doesn't seem to have resonated much, as many publishers keep pushing out their respective iPhone and iPad apps.

Continue reading on GigaOm

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-09-27 10:06

Today, the rise of tablets and apps is changing how we gather and consume content. A couple of apps have grabbed the headlines in recent months. Flipboard has closed over $60 million in funding and has a $200 million valuation. More recently, Zite was snapped up by CNN. Even Google (NSDQ: GOOG) is jumping on this bandwagon, based on reports of Google Propeller designed so Android and iOS users can curate content.

Continue reading on paidContent.org

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-09-23 11:58

News organizations whose mobile apps only provide users with their articles or videos are missing a big opportunity.

An application, by definition, should be applied to perform a task, to solve a problem. Most news doesn't do that.

Rather than just feed readers recent stories you wrote about their problems, apps can provide tools and data that enable users to actually solve their problems. When you solve problems, you get more loyal users and a chance to make more money. Here's how.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-09-23 11:50

Just a few short months ago the arrival of the iPad was being hailed as the saviour of the newspaper and magazine business. After the initial enthusiasm the realisation that apps are not a simple quick fix for the media industries malaise has led to a rapid growth in cynicism and caution. It reminds of the early response of the magazine industry to the emergence of the web: "It's interesting but there is no money in it - so we will wait and see."

Continue reading on TheMediaBriefing

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Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-25 12:20

Maybe Apple isn't so untouchable after all. The device maker, which has been locked in a battle with publishers, made a surprise concession recently, dropping a pricing requirement for its App Store that irked publishers. Before, publishers couldn't undercut the subscription price they offered in the App Store--the new guidelines do away with that requirement.

Continue reading on Adweek

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-06-14 14:25

Instead of limiting its next app to one device like the iPad, Fortune magazine has built a new app to run inside web browsers on a variety of platforms. And although the app, called Fortune500+, will only run only on desktop and laptop browsers at first, it will soon run on tablet browsers too.

As a web app, Fortune500+ joins what seems to be a slowly rising tide of apps that run in web browsers instead of the operating systems of particular devices.

Continue reading on Ad Age Mediaworks

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-06 10:36

If you haven't yet launched an app, do it quickly, just to see if your audience really wants them, says Renate Nyborg, Head of Business Development for A&N Mobile & TV in the United Kingdom.

Speaking at WAN-IFRA Digital Media Europe, being held in London from 11-13 April, Ms Nyborg says that's what A&N did with its Metro title - and the result from the simple exercise was a new apps business, tailored for the profile of Metro readers.

That first app was a simple PDF of the daily paper. "The key was doing something very quickly to get an idea of the appetite of our mobile readers for a mobile app," says Ms Nyborg. The result was 350,000 downloads.

Once the company learned its audience wanted apps, it started to develop more sophisticated offerings, ultimately leading to the creation of Metro Apps, a new business dedicated to lifestyle apps and games that appeal to the Metro audience and benefit from the brand.

"The key thing is to play to your strengths and build your strategy on insight," Ms Nyborg says. "It's not really about just jumping on the bandwagon like people did a few years ago on social media. It's about defining your audience, how they use content, and then building something that fits in to their behaviour."

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-13 10:54

In the coming weeks, News Corp. is set to unveil one of its more audacious content bets in recent years: The Daily, a newspaper designed for the iPad and the generation of tablet devices it inspired.

Conceived by News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch, who negotiated directly with Apple CEO Steve Jobs, the publication breaks new ground in a couple of ways. First, it's one of the biggest bets on traditional journalism in years on any platform -- 100 writers, editors and designers have been hired for the project -- since Conde Nast sunk $100 million into Portfolio magazine.

Continue reading on the Ad Age site

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-01-18 18:19

CNN's new iPad app is completely different than the news network's website, because it was designed specifically for the iPad, and isn't meant to be a tablet-version of the website, Kenneth Estenson, the company's senior vice president and general manager of CNN.com, told Poynter.org's Damon Kiesow.

"With a multi-touch interface, there is no rulebook yet," he said. "The iPad is so new. The initial question was, 'What do I want to touch?'" The design centres on high quality images, because people "want to touch imagery more than words," he explained.

Image: Broadsheet view of CNN's iPad app The app is completely ad-supported and free of charge, and CNN has also made its current iPhone app free as well, paidContent reported.

The app has three views: broadsheet, list view (with a continually updated list of stories) and slideshow, which shows the day's top stories. The content also incorporates text articles, video and users' comments.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-16 22:11

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