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Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Fri - 24.10.2014


bloggers

The Guardian has announced its Guardian Local pilot is to end. Described as an experiment in local journalism, three websites were set up two years ago to serve Cardiff, Leeds and Edinburgh.

The publisher says the idea was to find out whether new models of local journalism could be editorially and commercially viable.

Continue reading on the Media Briefing

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-09 11:05

The Huffington Post's most touted citizen journalist, Mayhill Fowler, has quit the Huffington Post, according to a blog posted on Washington Post. She is known for scooping the pros twice during the 2008 presidential campaign, recording Bill Clinton's tirade against Vanity Fair writer Todd Purdum and quoting Barack Obama saying working class voters "cling to guns or religion."

Fowler took to her own blog to explain why she quit: "I want to be paid for my time and effort - or at a minimum, to get a little remuneration in return for the money I spend myself in order to do original reportage. I would not expect to be paid for punditry. The Huffington Post business model is to provide a platform for 6,000 opinionators to hold forth. Point of view is cheap. I would never expect to be paid there when the other 5,999 are not. However, the journalism pieces I have done in the past year seem to me as good as anything HuffPost's paid reporters Sam Stein and Ryan Grim produce. Why do they get money, and I do not? I don't recall either of them writing the story about Barack Obama waxing large on "clinging to guns and religion," which seems more and more as time goes by to be the one big story out of the last presidential election to live on. Or at least it is the one that journalists and pundits are quoting regularly now."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-28 20:44

Trinity Mirror's Birmingham Mail has allotted a section of its website for the creation of "hyperlocal" communities in association with local bloggers, aimed to provide readers with multimedia news and information across 34 areas of the West Midlands, HoldTheFrontPage.co.uk reported last week.

The communities established will feature a mix of in-house authored news, picture galleries, Fish4 property listings and links to posts written by local bloggers, indexed by each of the 38 areas, according to paidContent. There is no ad revenue sharing; however, bloggers will have a voice in how some of the Birmingham Mail Charitable Trust's donations are spent, as well as being in charge of the agenda for quarterly community workshops.
More than 25 hyperlocal websites in and around the city have agreed to content sharing in print and online, with links correctly credited back to their website, according to the press release posted on Easier.com. RSS feeds from hyperlocal websites will be prominently positioned in the Communities section.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-08-17 22:43

The Italian government has extended its provision within the Media and Wiretapping Bill, "obbligo di rettifica", or rectification obligation, a law dating back to 1948 that requires newspapers or anyone "responsible for informative websites" to publish corrections, and passed a new law aimed at restraining online freedom of speech under the Berlusconi leadership, TheInquirer.net reported.

This law requires Italian bloggers, podcasters and users of social networking sites like Facebook to rectify "incorrect facts" published, and post corrections within 48 hours of receipt of complaint. Any failure to abide by the law within the timeline provided would result in the imposition of a fine of up to €25,000 to be paid by the author or publisher.

Image: Italian President Berlusconi
The European Digital Rights (EDRI), a pan-European coalition of online civil liberties advocacy organisations, and Italian journalists who call this bill "authoritarian" warn that it might darken much of the Italian cyberspace comprising of small-scale bloggers, website owners and users who comment on discussion pages, as they will be left with little or no time to deal with complaint requests and publish corrections within the time span allotted, EUObserver.com reported today.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-07-30 21:14

Speaking yesterday from The Wall Street Journal's annual 'D: All Things Digital' conference in California, Apple CEO Steve Jobs made a number of significant statements about the role of journalism in a democracy, the paradigm shift presented by the iPad as well as predictions for the future of personal computing.

In an on-stage interview with Walt Mossberg, Jobs stated that "One of my beliefs, very strongly, is that any democracy depends on a free, healthy press. Some of these newspapers, the news-gathering and editorial organizations are really important, I don't want to see us descend into a nation of bloggers, myself. I think we need editorial more than ever right now.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-04 19:35

The Washington Post is creating a "local blogging network," in which the newspaper will link to selected blogs from its Web site, Adam Pagnucco of Maryland Politics Watch wrote last week. As part of the network, the Post would ask bloggers to submit original content, which would be edited by Post editors. The Post would also have rights to that content through a written agreement, and expect that bloggers participate in a blogger "discussion" each week and stick to a "workflow" plan.

The only problem with the set-up is that the Post wouldn't actually pay the bloggers, he stated.

Pugnacco wrote in the Maryland Politics Watch blog: "Five weeks ago, I received an unsolicited offer from the Washington Post. They asked if they could post my picture and biography on their Web site and link to every new blog post appearing here if I agreed to produce regular original content for them at their request. I turned them down. Why? Because they wanted me to work for them for nothing."

Using Google subscriber counts, Pugnacco estimates that "MPW's rag-tag band of volunteers, guests and rogues has slightly more regular online subscribers than the Post's entire paid staff of Maryland reporters combined. Remind me again why WE should be working for the Post for free?"

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-04 00:03

Popular tech blog Gizmodo's leak of the new iPhone prototype has garnered the attention of more than just interested Apple fanatics. Last Friday, Gizmodo editor Jason Chen arrived home around 9:45 to find police in his home, removing 4 computers and 2 servers with a search warrant signed by the judge of the Superior Court of San Mateo as their defense. In response, Gawker Chief Operating Officer and legal counsel Gaby Derbyshire claims this search was illegal under a California shield law created especially to protect journalists, and that the police must return Chen's belongings.

What has since erupted across the web and likely in legal courts soon is a debate over the legality of Gizmodo's iPhone scoop, the application of the untested shield law, and, most fundamentally, whether bloggers are considered journalists in the eyes of the law.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-28 22:05

Worldwide, bloggers have reached 184 million people, according to Universal McCann in March 2008, while 26.4 million of them were from United States. Additionally, there were 346 million people worldwide who read blogs, or 77 percent of active Internet users, 60.3 million of which came from the United States, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

According to comScore's data in August 2008, there were 77.7 million unique visitors in the United States, out of the total 188.9 million online population.

eMarketer's data shows that in May 2008, there were 94.1 million U.S. blog readers, or half of the Internet users. The number of bloggers reached 22.6 million, which represents 12 percent of all online users, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-03-23 23:25

Russian publishing house Kommersant has announced the launch of a blog section, Lenta.ru reported today. The blog is still working in trial mode, but already has three full-time bloggers: Oleg Kashin, Andrei Kolesnikov and Olga Allenova.

Kolesnikov and Allenova are currently in Ukraine, offering coverage on electoral campaigns. Other Kommersant journalists have blogs but that they haven't started publishing yet. According to Chief Editor Pavel Chernikov, the outlet would be adding blogs dedicated to culture, international politics and others.

The publisher's online portal Kommersant.ru has Web sites for daily paper Kommersant as well as its numerous magazines that are focused on the economy, business issues, entertainment and other content.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-02-03 20:16

The U.S. government today published guidelines for participating in "From Town Crier to Bloggers: How Will Journalism Survive the Internet Age?," an upcoming conference concerning the economic future of newspapers.

Some bloggers are concerned that the talks are aimed at pushing back the incursion of new media on the traditional industry or developing a bailout plan for ailing newspaper conglomerates.

Comments must be submitted to the Federal Trade Commission by November 6, 2009 to be considered in conjunction with the roundtable. The roundtable will be held at the FTC's Conference Center, 601 New Jersey Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001 on December 1 and 2.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-07 23:33

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