WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Mon - 24.11.2014


closures

For the media industry, 2010 was a big improvement over the disaster that was 2009. A new report adds up exactly how much better last year was, starting with how many newspapers folded.

Continue reading on Crain's New York Business

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-01-26 17:28

The Washington Independent announced today that it will be closing down by December 1 due to a lack of funding, the Columbia Journalism Review revealed.

In a post published on its website, Washington Independent editor Aaron Wiener wrote that the website "was not just a journalistic experiment; it was also a financial one, and ultimately, the successes of the former couldn't sustain the strains of the latter."

The news site launched in January of 2008 as a part of the American Independent News Network and it relied on donations and grants, primarily from foundations seeking to promote journalism in the public interest," Wiener explained. "Those donations began drying up long ago."

According to media reports, The New Mexico Independent was also shut down today. "The New Mexico Independent as you know it is now closed. The site will remain live, possibly with a half-time blogger. Deepest apologies," Editor Gwyneth Doland wrote on Twitter, Alibi.com revealed.

David Bennahum, the president and CEO of The American Independent News Network, said donations for New Mexico news site decreased from US$187,000 in 2008 to $32,500 in 2010, nmpolitics.net quoted.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-17 22:25

The media joint venture of Avusa Media and Pearson, BDFM announced plans to discontinue publication of its "Big News for the Business Owner" newspaper soon, according to a report by MediaUpdate.co.za yesterday.

"Closing Big News does not mean the company has lost faith in the small business market; it is just that, perhaps, under the circumstances, Big News had the odds stacked against it," BDFM managing director Mzi Malunga was quoted as saying by BizCommunity.com. "I would like to take this opportunity to pay tribute to the hard working Big News team, especially its editor, Samantha Kalisa."

Since its launch in 1996, the South African newspaper has been providing a voice to small and medium business owners, while helping them grow their businesses and create jobs. It has also been a part of the BDFM media brands that include titles such as Business Day, the Financial Mail, Summit TV and The Home Channel, MediaUpdate.co.za reported yesterday.

Around 80,000 copies of the newspaper have been distributed monthly, BizCommunity.com reported. Malunga further added that the "details of the newspaper's winding-down process will be communicated to the rest of the business in coming weeks."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-11-16 16:21

Sun-Times Media Holdings LLC, owner of the Chicago Sun-Times, will shut down 11 Sun weekly newspapers by the end of the year to cut costs, the Chicago Tribune revealed yesterday.

Chief Executive Officer Jeremy Halbreich said the company might close some of its offices, but savings will come from "not printing and distributing the papers," ChicagoBusines.com reported. He said other Sun-Times publications would reabsorb the weeklies' staff.

The Sun newspapers that will be eliminated are Batavia, Bolingbrook, Downers Grove, Geneva, Glen Ellyn, Homer Glen, Lisle, Wheaton, Fox Valley and Lincoln-Way. According to the Sun-Times Media website, these weeklies have a combined circulation of 197,560 copies.

In the last two years, the media group eliminated more than 100 jobs as part of a restructuring process. Furthermore, a group of investors "bought the newspaper assets out of bankruptcy last year for [US]$5 million and the assumption of $22 million in liabilities," ChicagoBusiness.com reminded.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-12 16:51

Ireland's oldest provincial newspaper, the Limerick Leader and Limerick Chronicle, have announced a review of the newspaper's printing operations in Limerick. If the proposals are implemented, the facility could be closed by mid-December and 29 people would be laid off, the Limerick Leader reported yesterday.

The staff has taken a 40 percent pay cut and opted for a three day week to keep the printing plant in operation, according to a report by RTE. The Unite trade union that represents the workers at the plant will be meeting with the management of Johnston Press, which owns the newspaper, in the coming days to explore alternative possibilities to closure or to secure a fair redundancy deal.

The company has said it will make "every effort to minimise the impact of this proposal on affected staff through, where possible, by re-deployment to alternative positions in the group," David Crow, divisional managing director of print for Johnston Press, told the Limerick Leader. "Despite the best efforts of the staff and management at Leader Print Limited, the unprecedented reductions in printing requirements across the industry has resulted in the company having to review its operations in Limerick."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-11-10 16:27

The Hammersmith and Fulham council, in West London, announced that it would close in April its free newspaper H&F News in response to the rules proposed by Communities and Local Government Secretary Eric Pickles, who in June declared a war to what he calls "town hall Pravdas," MediaGuardian reported today.

The council will maintain an e-mail newsletter to inform citizens about services it provides. However, it also plans to look "for a buyer to take over advertising contracts thought to be worth around £375,000," the Hammersmith and Fulham Chronicle revealed. The council will expect to receive a percentage of the advertising revenues as well as "regular slot" in the publication to include notices and information. "The newspaper we choose to have a contract with will always be 100 per cent independent of us," said a council spokesman.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-08 18:12

German publisher Axel Springer announced it will shut down the Russian edition of Newsweek due to financial reasons, Vedomosti reported today. The issue published this week will be the last one, Dni.ru added.

Valerii Fadeev, editor-in-chief of Russian magazine Ekspert, pointed out that Russian Newsweek wasn't economically viable since it failed to gather a large enough audience; meaning that sales figures were not sufficient to upkeep the "obligatory flow of ads," Vedomosti stated. However, Russian Newsweek's Editor-in-Chief Mikhail Fishman (left) told RSN that there was no need to shut down the magazine because the problems the publisher referred to could have been overcome.

Image: RSN

"I think that [economic difficulties] were a temporary feature, and all the losses could have been solved next year, but the published made a different decision," Fishman said." I understood, in what economic situation the magazine was, but I didn't see any serious, insurmountable problems."

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-10-18 16:06

Bulgarian daily newspaper Klassa will be shutting down its print edition from October 1 due to economic difficulties, Novinite.com reported today.

As a part of company restructuring operations implemented by many newspapers recently to reduce costs, the Bulgarian daily will continue to publish online, while terminating its print edition.

Image: Novinite.com

The daily is being published by Klassa Bulgaria EAD and managed by Milen Gerasimov, with Andrey Rusinov and Lazar Peshev as managing partners. Since its launch in September 2007, the newspaper has been offering content on financial and economic issues and those published on Financial Times as well.

According to an announcement by the newspaper today, all employees of Klassa will receive a month's notice before termination of their contracts. Neda Popova, editor-in-chief at the newspaper, also expressed hope that most of their terminated journalists will be rehired for its online edition, according to Novinite.com.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-07 21:15

The Alpha Newspaper Group, which is the largest weekly publisher in Northern Ireland, on Monday closed the Roscommon Champion, the Longford News and the Athlone Voice, the BBC reported.

The company said the decision was taken after a severe decline of circulation and advertising revenue, RTE.ie informed. In recent months, several staff members were laid off and the design and layout departments were centralized to reduce costs.

In a statement partially reproduced by The Irish Times, the workers of the Roscommon Champion said they were "traumatized" by the news.

"These are difficult economic times and the staff understood the need to introduce efficiencies. However, no newspaper with foundations stretching back more than eighty years should have been allowed to close its doors," the staff said.

The secretary of the National Union of Journalists Seamus Dooley criticized the closures because they represent "a blow to media diversity as well as a significant blow to the economy of the Midlands," The Irish Times quoted.

He also accused the company of being "fully aware" of the market situation and the newspaper competition in the region when it launched the Athlone Voice in 2003, the BBC reminded.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-09-01 13:11

The free newspaper industry seems to be doing better this year as only three dailies have closed in the first 8 months of 2010, Newspaper Innovation revealed yesterday.

In the last four years, 2009 remains the year with more closures with 42 titles and their 97 editions disappearing from the streets. According to the data compiled by Newspaper Innovation, in 2007 30 titles shut down while in 2008 some 33 free dailies closed.

Graphic source: Newspaper Innovation

2010 closures include Portugal's Global Noticias, which had a circulation of 140,000 copies and stopped being published due to a "deep structural change of the market of the press," and Mexico's El Nuevo Siglo.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-08-24 19:31

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