Date

Thu - 23.11.2017


conference

Last month, 300 media professionals gathered in London’s Science Museum to attend WAN-IFRA’s Digital Media Europe conference. Over three days, top executives shared their thoughts about how modern newspaper publishers can stay on the cutting edge of digital media.

Speakers included Arthur Sulzberger, Jr., Chairman and CEO of The New York Times Company and Andrew Miller, CEO of Guardian Media Group.

WAN-IFRA members can now download a full, executive summary of the conference here. Non-members can get an abbreviated version here for the “price” of a Tweet or a Facebook post.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-10 10:26

Norway's Verdans Gang CEO Torry Pedersen kicked off WAN-IFRA's Readership Conference today in San Francisco by enumerating the multimedia company's focus on readers and users.

"Always a reader knows more than a reporter, always," Pedersen explained, saying that VG has found success inviting participation by readers, especially when big news happens.

For example:

- When the Icelandic ash cloud engulfed Europe and shut down air traffic, VG built a "Hitchhikers Central" website in seven hours, matching people who needed ground transportation with those who can drive them throughout Europe. More than 5,000 connections were made through this service.

- When the swine flu pandemic hit, VG produced a swine flu portal to provide swine flu background, and resources and vaccine information in each Norwegian community. The site received 1.7 million page views.

- VG is ramping up its connections with Facebook and Twitter. Pedersen said a large percentage of linking to stories starts on social networks. VG has attracted 160,000 fans in 18 different VG Facebook groups.

Author

Martha Stone

Date

2010-11-16 19:48

Speaking yesterday from The Wall Street Journal's annual 'D: All Things Digital' conference in California, Apple CEO Steve Jobs made a number of significant statements about the role of journalism in a democracy, the paradigm shift presented by the iPad as well as predictions for the future of personal computing.

In an on-stage interview with Walt Mossberg, Jobs stated that "One of my beliefs, very strongly, is that any democracy depends on a free, healthy press. Some of these newspapers, the news-gathering and editorial organizations are really important, I don't want to see us descend into a nation of bloggers, myself. I think we need editorial more than ever right now.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-04 18:35

The World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) has been forced to call off the World Newspaper Congress and postpone the World Editors Forum, planned for Beirut from 7 to 10 June next, due to the failure of the Lebanese host organisation to meet its financial commitments.

"It is with immense disappointment that we are forced to call off our events in Beirut, but it was simply impossible to go ahead without the commitment of our Lebanese colleagues, who were responsible for security and other significant infrastructural and service expenses," said Gavin O'Reilly, President of WAN-IFRA. "We deeply regret that we cannot bring these events to Lebanon, particularly as this will cause immense inconvenience for our members, but this is not feasible without a local partner."

The local host, An-Nahar newspaper, has just informed WAN-IFRA that it was unable to provide the agreed funds to meet its obligations in the aftermath of the 2009 financial, economic and political crisis in the region. The cost of the venue, security and other local expenses was estimated to be 1.6 million euros and could not be covered by registration fees alone.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-11 18:24

Newspapers around the globe are innovating their advertising practices in many ways, both big and small, and the best examples were on display this week at the World Newspaper Advertising Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark.

As advertising and sales revenues are hit both by recession and increasing competition, newspaper companies are rapidly developing a wide array of new revenue possibilities. The conference, which closed on Friday, examined many of the new trends - and some unusual projects that show just how flexible newspapers can be. Two major themes emerged from the conference, organised by the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA): better audience and advertising effectiveness research is essential, and the traditional business model for newspapers - gaining revenue from advertising and sales - can be enhanced in a modern media company.

For example:

- In Portugal, where the property market has collapsed, developers have no money for advertising. So Impresa Classificados returned to a barter economy - exchanging a 300,000 Euro advertising campaign for a three-room apartment, which is promptly offered in a lottery. People registered through a special number and paid 72 cents per call - raising 300,000 euro in net revenue for the newspaper company. "So, in the end, we managed an income that corresponds to the real value of the campaign," said Geert Van Hassal, Managing Director of Impresa Classificados.

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2010-03-05 20:04

Eamonn Byrne, business director of the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA), opened the 20th World Newspaper Advertising Conference in Copenhagen today with an overview of advertising trends. Many markets reported a 30 percent to 40 percent drop last year.

The United States, for example, was particularly hard hit ­ a 29 percent drop in newspaper advertising revenues in the third quarter of 2009, according to the Newspaper Association of America. And Zenith Optimedia said there was a 13.1 percent average fall in advertising revenues world-wide in the first half of 2009. But Mr Byrne said it was important to remember that it isn't only media companies that suffered in 2009 the downturn hit nearly all industries. And the forecasts for 2010, for the most part, expect improvement.

But while the economy will improve, the structural challenges facing the industry are likely to remain. Although digital revenues are growing rapidly as a percentage of overall revenue, they are unlikely to replace or exceed the lost print revenues.

"We have a great future but the future isn't digital on its own ­ it has to be much more than this," said Mr Bryne. "This is out conundrum and why we are here today ­ we are looking for solutions to this problem."

Advertising Solutions for the Fast-Changing Media Environment: Moritz Wuttke, Founder, NextMedia Initiatives, Switzerland/China

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2010-03-04 18:38

The Financial Times was hired by the Canadian Government to produce conferences aimed at top global business executives. The FT plans to produce four events between February 13 and 27, BtoBonline reported.

The Global Business Leaders Day event focuses on the global economic outlook, and is scheduled to be held today. The conference attendees include Peter Van Loan, minister of international trade for the Canadian government, Mohamed El-Erian, CEO and Co-CIO of PIMCO, and Dame Clara Furse, former CEO of the London Stock Exchange Group.

"We wanted to capitalise on the increased demand for the FT surrounding the Olympic Games," said Doug Morrow, global operations director of newspapers for the FT, according to BtoBonline.

According to a statement, the FT group will temporarily be using the printing site in Seattle to meet anticipated increased circulation demand at Vancouver's luxury hotels and at the region's airports.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-22 15:13

The senior vice president and chief legal council of Google, Inc. and the CEO of Independent News & Media, plc, today agreed to disagree on the best way to protect content owners' copyrights on the Internet. However, INM's Gavin O'Reilly and Google's David Drummond did tell the audience of the World Newspaper Congress in Hyderabad they would continue meeting in the future to try and solve the issue.

O'Reilly argued that the current Robots Exclusion Protocol, or robots.txt, is outdated, saying publishers "need something more than essentially a binary 'yes/no' for the management and commercial exploitation of our valuable content." The answer, he said, is an updated standard like the Automated Content Access Protocol, an effort backed by the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers that seeks to give publishers a better way to control their copyrighted content online.

Drummond, left, discusses copyright protection on the Web with O'Reilly, left. Photo: Brian Powers, Western Integrated Media

ACAP may or may not be the right technical answer for the Web, but if nothing else, it sets up a starting point. It's something that should be welcomed by the content aggregators," O'Reilly said.

Drummond said robots.txt is honoured by all legitimate search engines, and gives publishers tremendous control over how content is shown in searches

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-04 01:46

Stella Dawson, Reuters global editor for treasury, told the World Editors Forum about how Reuters both provides newspapers with outsourcing solutions and runs its own off-shore operation.

"Outsourcing is not anything new" in the news industry, she said. For years, newspapers have been outsourcing production of some news to wires such as Reuters. What Reuters has been doing recently, however, is trying to find "customised solutions," rather than just giving all newspapers the same selection of articles to choose from.

For more on this article, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-03 09:45

People are willing to pay for online news, according to a recent study of 11 countries in North America, Europe and Australia, a senior manager from PricewaterhouseCoopers in the Netherlands told the World Newspaper Congress in Hyderabad today. When asked the question, "If there are no free alternatives, are you willing to pay for an online newspaper?" consumers said they are willing to pay 62 percent of the price of a traditional paper.

"This means there must be a possibility for newspaper companies to develop a proposition for your audience that is economically viable. Of course, if there are still free alternatives, it will be quite hard to do so. But if you have a good proposition, it certainly is possible to get paid for an online proposition," said Marieke van der Donk, senior manager of entertainment and media.

Marieke van der Donk, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Photo: Brian Powers, Western Integrated Media

When it comes to financial news, the value proposition is even higher. The same survey found that people are willing to pay 98 percent of what they pay for a traditional paper, or 98 cents on the euro or dollar. For sports, the number is 77 percent, she said."If you have relevant premium content, and it's not available elsewhere, consumers are willing to pay for it. Our research has proven that," she said, adding that hard news is very hard to charge consumers for.

She also pointed out it is important to "have your strategy in place" and to be "very clear in your subscription model."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-03 07:00

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