Date

Wed - 16.04.2014


data

Just over a year after The New York Times’ digital subscription model was launched, it provides the company with “incredible” audience data, the company’s chairman and CEO Arthur Sulzberger says at WAN-IFRA’s Digital Media Europe conference in London.

A total of 454,000 people have subscribed (not including print subscribers), and Sulzberger says much of the scepticism that abounded when the plan was first announced has since subsided. Given the number of media executives who have visited the paper’s offices over the last year, he expects many more payment models for digital content to be unveiled before long.

As well as the obvious financial benefit, Sulzberger noted that a key advantage of the subscription model is what it tells the paper about its audience’s reading habits.

For more on this story, please see our sister publication www.editorsweblog.org

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-04-16 17:59

A year ago, Knight Foundation and Mozilla announced a partnership to build a "bridge between the technology and the news community". The $2.5 million project funded fellowships for technology experts to work in newsrooms around the world - from The Guardian to Zeit Online - to help tackle digital challenges.

Now, Dan Sinker, head of the Knight-Mozilla News Technology Partnership at Mozilla has announced that the program is evolving to engage a wider community of journalist-coders.

Four main changes are going to be made to the Knight-Mozilla partnership, which is being so radically re-jigged that it has also been re-named "OpenNews".

1) The project will help organise and pay for "more than a dozen hackdays" this year in different international locations, allowing developers to experiment with coding for journalism.

2) The parternship promises to increase online resources for developers who want to learn about journalism, and for journalists who want to learn how to code.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-07 19:17

Working with numbers is becoming more important than ever for journalists.

Vast amounts of data are being collected online, investigative journalism outfits like ProPublica are doing more and more work with large sets of publicly available data, and data visualisations are increasingly becoming a standard part of reporting. At the end of last year, Amy Webb, CEO of Webbmedia, named 'Big Data' as her first prediction of a major tech trend for 2011.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-02 17:18

As the Republican primaries heat up in the US, news organizations everywhere are trying to predict the winner. But while none of them have a crystal ball, Politico does have a new source of knowledge at its disposal: Facebook.

Last Thursday Politico and Facebook announced they were partnering up to measure user opinion of Republican candidates. A Facebook data team is using an automated process to measure how often users are mentioning, sharing and linking to GOP candidates and whether these mentions are positive or negative. The results are handed onto Politico, whose journalists analyse and publish them. The first set of data is already out.

The project has been greeted by many as great opportunity to paint a detailed picture of voter opinion. Mashable writes that the vast number of Facebook users and the huge amount of information that Facebook holds on them means that the social network "can become a unique space to conduct survey-based research". Read Write Web writes that "Facebook could be the biggest, most dynamic census of human opinion and interaction in history".

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-16 19:01

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