Date

Wed - 23.04.2014


digital

By now you’ll have heard an awful lot about native advertising. Like the fact that it will save us all (maybe), that news companies see a financial future in it, and that it while it sure can attract a whole lotta love, alas, the time has not come for The New York Times to embrace it.

A quick recap: native advertising is independently compelling content (text, video or other) that is paid for by a brand, and semi-camouflaged in a publication’s natural editorial environment. It should neither stick out like a sore thumb nor dupe the reader, somewhat like how the model in the picture above blends prettily into her bed of leaves, without leading anyone to believe that she herself is plant-based.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-16 18:48

A healthy rise in online and mobile advertising revenue in 2012 and 2013 will more than compensate for the steep losses facing the traditional publishing sector, predicts a new report by Media buying network GroupM.

The group, which calls itself "the world's number one media investment management operation," estimates that Britain's overall advertising market will grow sluggishly this year and next, with only moderate help from the London Olympic Games.

Digital high jump

The UK is recognized as a world leader in digital ad spending as a percent of total media, and the upward trend looks set to continue into 2013, according to GroupM futures director Adam Smith. “Digital spending growth already represents a quarter of the entire UK marketing economy, and it continues to grow,” he said on the GroupM website.

The report predicts that digital advertising spending will jump by 11 percent between this year and next, surpassing £5.3 billion ($8.3 billion) by the end of 2012, and reaching £6 billion ($9.4 billion) in 2013.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-03 16:42

Not content with a soon-to-be-launched video streaming network and a host of new European editions, the Huffington Post is releasing a new weekly iPad magazine tomorrow named “Huffington.

The New York Times previews the new publication, noting that some content will be pulled from huffingtonpost.com, but other articles will also be “new and separate from that of the rest of the site”. The magazine, which is only available though the Apple store, will feature a mix of long-form pieces (of between 4,000 and 8,000 words), photos, commentary, reviews, illustrations, videos and data visualisations.

“From the beginning we wanted to do something that felt like a print magazine," says Huffington’s creative director Josh Klenert (formerly of Billboard), quoted by Joe Pompeo at Capital New York.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-13 18:07

Reports about the global newspaper industry collapsing around our ears are a fairly common occurrence nowadays - Jack Shafer’s piece for Reuters yesterday titled “The great newspaper liquidation” is just one example. But two publications that have been defying the general gloom and growing their profits are the Economist and the Financial Times.

This being the case, perhaps it’s no surprise that Atlantic Media announced earlier this year that it would be launching a new publication to take "a run at the space that The Economist and the Financial Times currently occupy."

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-06 15:45

Magazine publisher Future PLC, which puts out publications such as Total Film, Classic Rock, released its interim financial results yesterday, and revealed that it has seen a 48% rise in digital revenues in the UK in the six months leading up to March 31, partly thanks to the boost it has received from Apple’s Newsstand. But although its digital income was up 37% over this period, losses in print meant that the company’s overall revenue still dropped 4%.

In its financial report, Future strongly pushes its success on the iPad. Since the Newsstand was launched in October last year Future has made sales on the platform with more that £3 million. It has sold more than 830,000 copies of its magazines through Newsstand, with 45% of those sales coming being subscriptions. Encouragingly, the Future writes that 90% of subscribers are new customers.

Future’s CEO Mark Wood comments in the report that “Future is seizing the opportunities offered by new platforms and channels to reach new audiences and grow a global digital business.” He states that, “on Apple's iPad, Future is one of the world's leading digital publishers in sales volumes and number of titles. That is a sign of how far we have come in a very short time."

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-23 14:10

Olympic athletes are not the only ones making ambitions preparations for this summer’s games. The BBC outlined its plans for covering the Olympics in a statement yesterday, promising to provide 2,500 hours of live Olympic coverage, up from the 1,500 hours that the BBC produced at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.

“We will be bringing live coverage of every Olympic Sport from every venue, both through a combination of BBC One and BBC Three and up to 24 simultaneous streams live online on PC, mobile, tablet or connected TV. These services will be complemented by coverage on Radio 5 live, mobile and tablet, while the majority of cable and satellite viewers will be able to access the 24 channels on their providers’ platform through the BBC Red Button,” said Roger Mosey, BBC director of London 2012.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-16 15:59

Why would a company pay a newspaper for advertising, when it can broadcast directly to its audience online? The question has long been perplexing newspaper companies, who are seeing their revenues drop as a consequence of brands cutting them out of the advertising process and going straight to Twitter or Facebook to reach their customers.  

But instead of fighting the shift, the New York Times Company launched a new advertising initiative yesterday, which aims to benefit from the fact that brands are becoming their own publishers. Ricochet, as the Times’s product is called, hopes to generate revenue by allowing brands to select specific New York Times content that is relevant to their customers, and then to share links to a version of that content surrounded by their own advertising.

“In the traditional advertising model, brands reach audiences through content; by contrast, using Ricochet, content reaches audiences through brands," explains the vice president of research and development at the Times, Michael Zimbalist, quoted in the official press release.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-27 15:37

Many people see tech giants as the death of journalism. For one thing, they suck up much of the ad revenue that used to go to newspapers. For another, they make users accustomed to being given content for free. But rather than killing the news, are big digital players like Google simply forcing it to be reinvented?

This is what Robert Andrews suggests in an article, published today by paidContent, which covers a meeting of Paley Center’s international council of media executives in Madrid. Andrews quotes the head of news products and Google+ programming at Google, Richard Gingras, and Facebook’s journalism manager Vadim Lavrusik, who both presented the media executives with ways that journalism would be reformed with technology.

Among the points that Gingras made, was that technology was upending the traditional story form. “There will be a day – and it should not be far from now – where we can create persistent forms of stories not written in narrative form but in (Google) Fusion Tables and query strings, status updates and tweets,” said Gingras, quoted by Andrews.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-26 17:42

According to Google, the question that businesses should be asking isn’t whether or not to invest in mobile, but how. And Google is right there to provide the answers with the release of The Mobile Playbook, Mashable reports.

Coauthored by Google’s Head of Mobile Sales and Strategy Jason Spero and Senior Product Marketing Manager for Mobile Ads Johanna Werther, The Mobile Playbook: The Busy Executive’s Guide to Winning with Mobile asks “five crucial mobile questions” that business executives should explore: How does mobile change our value proposition? How does mobile impact our digital destinations? How is our organization adapting to mobile? How should our marketing adapt to mobile? How can we connect with our tablet audience?

Addressing each question, the Playbook also offers several strategies that businesses can use to understand their mobile potential, including using focus groups and surveys to get a sense of their audiences’ mobile habits. Additionally, the guide features case studies of various companies that have been using mobile technology successfully.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-26 17:32

It’s easy to find pessimistic statements about the impossibility of traditional newspapers making real money from online news. But the gloom isn’t everywhere. Mail Online’s publisher Martin Clarke told investors last Wednesday that the newspaper website is expecting to become profitable for the first time this year.

According to paidContent, Clarke stated that the site expects to break even this year, with revenues of £25m. This figure is expected to rise to £45m in 2013 and £100m within the next five years. Clarke shares these projections despite the fact that, last November, Martin Morgan, CEO of Mail Online’s parent company DGMT, said that “profitability on a meaningful scale is not going to be until 2013 or so,” according to paidContent.  

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-23 17:57

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