Date

Wed - 23.07.2014


e-readers

With each introduction of a new reading device publishers around the world are overcome with the same recurring same fantasy: What if it worked, this time around? Could a reliable business model emerge for news publishing companies?

Last week's launch of new Kindles is no exception to the cyclic fantasy. For those who where on Mars last Wednesday, here is a look at the revamped family:

Continue reading on Monday Note

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-06 10:13

Less than 1 percent of overall online newspaper views are made on an iPad, according to an infographic published on Monday by The Wall Street Journal, Editor & Publisher reported.

Ninety-seven percent of news readings are done through computers while only 2 percent come from mobiles, The Wall Street Journal revealed. Based on comScore data, the graph shows that iPads are mostly used early in the mornings or at night, which signals "that people use tablets during leisure times," Poynter.org's Damon Kiesow wrote.

Infographic source: The Wall Street Journal

Furthermore, users read news through the computer during working hours, whereas the usage of mobile devices rises in the morning. The graphic provides a valuable insight on the online newspaper consumption, Kiesow said.

"With smart phones, and especially tablets, readers may be more amenable to more focused, less rushed news experiences. So, while a reader may not have time watch a video, or read a long-form news story at work on their computer, they might while sitting on the couch that evening with a tablet."

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-22 18:12

Research in Motion Ltd. will sell its BlackBerry PlayBook tablet for under US$500, said co-chief executive officer Jim Balsillie. The touch screen tablet will be launched in the United States in the first quarter of 2011, The Wall Street Journal reported today.

"There's a lot of demand and we are seeing a lot of interest from international retailers," Balsillie said, adding that the Asian market, especially South Korea and Japan will be key.

Image: AFP
According to the Christian Science Monitor, the price set by RIM puts the PlayBook "in direct competition with the Apple iPad," which is currently being at a initial price of $499.

The PlayBook is smaller than the iPad as it has a 7-inch display while Apple's tablet is 9.7 inches, the Agence France Press reported. Furthermore, it will used Adobe Flash video software and will connect to the Internet through Wi-Fi or Bluetooth.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-11 01:13

China-based tech firm Hanvon is expected to announce today the first e-reader with color e-ink at this year's FDP International trade show in Tokyo, Japan, PC Mag reported.

The device will emerge on the Chinese market in March next year and may cost US$440, according to CNN. The e-reader will have a 9.68 inch touchscreen as well as 3G and Wi-Fi connectivity.

Image: NYT

"Consumers want everything: vibrant color and full video with low power consumption and zero glare at an unbeatable price. Until that arrives, we'll continue to see both makers and readers in this space accepting tradeoffs and experimenting to find a balance that works," Wired.com stated.

According to The New York Times, e-ink's black-and-white displays are present on almost 90 percent of e-readers across the globe, i.e. Amazon's Kindle or Sony's Reader Daily Edition. Apple's iPad and Barnes & Noble's recently unveiled colour Nook reader both use LCD technology.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-09 17:14

As publishers continue to look for new revenue streams, 27 percent of American and Canadian publishers "expect mobile to significantly impact their revenue in just two years," according to an online survey conducted by the Audit Bureau of Circulations, Poynter.org reported today.

Twenty-eight percent said they believe sponsorships will bring advertising revenue, followed by search (22 percent), video (21 percent), banner ads (19 percent) and pop-ups (19 percent), paidContent.org revealed. But publishers said they would not rely only on advertisements and plan to charge subscription fees to the applications.

"Many magazines and newspapers are already implementing their plans and tweaking their offerings while others are following close behind," ABC president and managing director Michael Lavery stated in a press release.

Although 78 percent of those surveyed disagree with the idea that print publications will eliminate their print issues, 63 percent said e-readers "would become vital distribution channels for their publication." For instance, 60 percent of newspapers publishers plan to develop an iPad application in the next six to twelve months.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-04 21:45

According to Gizmodo.com, newspapers retain hope that tablets and applications will help keep them afloat. "The New York Times, Wall Street Journal and USA Today are building special tablet-y apps for Samsung's Galaxy Tab, hoping to easily port the app over to other Android tablets," reports the article. Plus, the Wall Street Journal wants to put all of its information on the Blackberry PlayBook.

The Wall Street Journal also says that "in some cases, device makers are talking about advertising their devices in certain publications, in exchange for publishers agreeing to build an application for them." This means that tablet makers need content and they are offering to pay publishers for their applications in an indirect manner. In addition to this, publishers need the money because ad sales are down--this is why they are looking to tablets to bring them out of their rut.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-11 22:08

In the United States, owners of tablets like the iPad spend 75 percent more time reading newspapers than those without these gadgets, according to a survey conducted by the Harrison Group and publishing service company Zinio, the Los Angeles Times reported today.

Users of reading devices such as the Amazon Kindle also dedicate at least 50 percent more time on newspapers and 45 percent more time reading books. The study explained users make up the time by watching less television and going online less, PRNewswire revealed.

"For years, our consumer research has demonstrated the growing demand for digital reading. The ease of access, the convenience of content storage and now the high quality of the screen experience makes reading fast and fun," said Jeanniey Mullen, executive vice president and chief marketing officer of Zinio.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-05 23:03

A survey conducted by the Association of Online Publishers found that UK-based publishers are more focused on mobile platforms and tablet devices to help next year's digital ventures, pointing out that innovative technology is "at the heart of their business development plans over the next 12 months" and will promote "dynamic growth," a press release stated.

Ninety-one percent of the participants said they are hoping to improve revenues from mobile devices whereas 86 percent are enthusiastic about the launch of tablet computers, The Independent reported yesterday. Other opportunities publishers saw include high speed broadband connection, social networks, paid content, e-Commerce and behavioral targeting. Sixty percent considered it to be necessary to offer online content that is local, BCS mentioned.

Image: MediaGuardian

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-28 19:22

U.S. Publisher Hearst Magazines is preparing to open an "App Lab" at its Hearst Tower headquarters in Manhattan, paidContent reported. The lab will serve as a "think tank" for those in the advertising and marketing industries, aiming to to kick-start business associations and help experts discuss mobile content ideas with the publishing industry.

The initiative is set to begin in September, with educational sessions on topics including previews of emerging mobile content, applications and platforms, including iPad and other tablets; advertiser and agency roundtables on new ad formats and models; and consumer insight panels, among other programming, according to the press release posted on WebWire.com. In early 2011, the group plans to open up a physical space for showcasing its iPhone, iPad and tablet products exclusively to consumers.

Image: greenquest.co.uk
"The App Lab is a digital think tank to bring together innovators, both inside Hearst and across the media and technology industries, in order to create the smartest content, ad models and platforms that resonate with consumers today," David Carey, Hearst Magazines' newly named president, stated in the press release.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-08-25 20:23

Google Inc. is planning to start selling e-books this summer via a platform that would give readers the option to download the books onto different types of electronic devices, the company announced today.

The new service, called Google Editions, will offer e-books for sale through the company and through other retailers, McClatchy-Tribune Newspapers reported. It will be "device agnostic," Gabriel Stricker, a Google spokesman, said today.

Photo: Patrick Gage's flickr photostream

The launch of Google Editions may position the online giant to compete in the growing e-book market along with Amazon.com and Apple Inc., the report pointed out.

The Kindle was launched in late 2007 and so far has led the e-book market; however, Amazon does not release sales data for the device. The iPad was released by Apple last month, and reported that it has sold 1 million devices and 1.5 million copies of e-books on its iBookstore service since then.

The Christian Science Monitor reported that Google Editions may launch as early as June.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-04 23:54

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