WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Sat - 01.11.2014


editorial

Newspapers and broadcasters in the United Kingdom are less willing to spend money on investigative journalism than ever before, causing the type of reporting newspapers have been hailed for to begin "dying a death," documentary maker Kevin Toolis told a panel at the Sheffield Doc/Fest today, MediaGuardian reported.

Investigative reporting is "disgracefully expensive," and needs more outlets willing to pay for it, David Henshaw, managing director of Hardcash Productions.

Image: SBCWorks.org

As budgets at traditional outlets get tighter, new operations have sprung up to try and fill the gap of investigative reporting.

In July, the British Bureau of Investigative Journalism published its first story, which was picked up by the British Medical Journal and Al Jazeera English, Journalism.co.uk reported at the time. The not-for-profit was launched in April, has 17 freelance and full-time staff, and is located in City University London.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-04 17:25

Newspapers are generally regarded for their roles in societies as giving citizens a tool to better monitor their governments and other officials, and pushing for progress and promoting free speech. One newspaper in Uganda, operating on the opposite end of the spectrum, has been ordered to stop publishing the names of citizens it says are gay, according to a Reuters report, posted yesterday by the Irish Times.

The newspaper, called Rolling Stone, last month published the names and photos of citizens it said were homosexual, and called on authorities to put them to death. The headline was called "Men of Shame Part II," and followed the publication last month of 100 other people it alleged were gay.

Image: AP, via the Guardian

The Sexual Minorities Uganda group petitioned the country's high court to close the publication, as it was opening up innocent people to discrimination at the least, and violence at the worst, Frank Mugisha, chairman of the group, told Reuters.

Under Ugandan law, homosexuality is outlawed. Several people in the list published by Rolling Stone experienced harassment, according to the Guardian.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-02 16:32

Sports coverage is usually a top draw for readers. News publishers know readers want all the news and information involving their favourite teams - from each player's statistics to what is happening off the field. Many times sports news is related to the ugly truth that win or lose, the result of a sporting event can be acts of racism, violence and more.

How publishers handle their coverage of these sports issues is important well beyond the sports pages, and the new issue of Sport et Citoyenneté (Sport and Citizenship) discusses how news media outlets can give audiences what they want while maintaining top quality coverage - whether it's of an amazing goal or a riot outside a stadium.

"The sports press is not just business, it is a fundamental vehicle between supporters and professionals and a showcase for values," Argentinian football player Lionel Messi wrote to the International Association of Sports Newspapers.

Newspapers around the world rely on sports for revenues and readership, and to get more of both means providing 12 "must have" features on a publication's sports homepage, Stanislas Sabatier, a senior consultant at SapienS&Sapide, told a WAN-IFRA conference earlier this year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-06 17:54

The Huffington Post Investigative Fund, the journalism non-profit launched by Ariana Huffington in September 2009, has produced roughly 50 stories since its inception.

Nick Penniman, executive director of the fund, estimated that his editorial staff of nine publish between three and five stories a week. Some are "deep-dive" pieces, requiring months of reporting, while others are "quick-strike" articles that are less in-depth. The fund's articles are posted on their Web site and can be distributed by other news outlets free of charge under a Creative Commons license. in September 2009, has produced roughly 50 stories since its inception.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-12 21:57

The surge in social media has benefited journalists globally by offering them a world of information at their fingertips with powerful social networking tools and news aggregator sites. But this opportunity comes along with some risks as well. To lessen these risks, Reuters has added social media guidelines and principles to its handbook, Dean Wright, global editor for ethics, innovation and news standards at Reuters, announced yesterday in the Reuters Blog.

While Reuters embraces social media as a powerful informative tool and encourages its usage among journalists, they must ask permission from managers to use social media in conjunction with their professional lives, MediaGuardian reported.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-11 23:33

NewsCred launched in 2008 aiming to use algorithms combined with users' votes to rank news sources by credibility. That didn't work out, and the site is now manoeuvring in another direction, this time offering users a platform to build professionally-looking customised online newspaper sites in just minutes, TechCrunch reported last week.

Users can pick topics they are interested in or choose from a list of categories provided. The stories are then drawn from popular news sites and blogs, aggregated and listed in their appropriate sections.

The news customisation space is already very competitive, and at the top are online giants like Google. Other more "directly competitive" sites include Meehive, according to TechCrunch.

However, NewsCred has something its competitors don't - a unique feature that allows users to put their spin on the news with an "Editorial" section, in which customised news streams are placed next to a blogging element where users can write their own content. The customised newspaper can be shared via Twitter or e-mailed directly from the site, The Next Web reported.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-01-20 23:21

The Wall Street Journal today launched a new multimedia brand advertising campaign titled 'Live in the know.' The cross-platform campaign will be featured in print, online, broadcast and cable television networks, aiming to show how the WSJ goes beyond headlines and sound bites to give deeper understanding and perspectives behind news and events, Globe Newswire reported.

"As the top-selling newspaper in the U.S., the Wall Street Journal is unequalled in its reach to affluent and educated readers," said Jim Richardson, vice president of brand marketing for the WSJ, in a press release. "This campaign highlights the breadth and deeper understanding readers get every day, only from reading the Journal. We want to invite new readers to discover the diverse coverage The Wall Street Journal delivers, from business news, world news and politics, to more personal topics such as wellness, personal finance and leisure pursuits."

The current economic climate is challenging, and the campaign is meant to show how the WSJ empowers people, Gordon Bowen, chief creative officer at New York agency Mcgarrybowen, which created the campaign, told AdWeek.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-01-18 22:50

One of the reasons readers are trading online for print that is rarely discussed is that newspaper stories are too long, while online articles are more to-the-point, Michael Kinsley argues in the Atlantic this week.

His reasoning? "Context," which newspapers pride themselves on providing, has become "an invitation to hype," causing readers to go elsewhere to just get the facts. Shorter, more concise articles could cause a boost in print sales, but existing mandatory newsroom rules to give more context may be hurting print, he writes in his column.
"The software industry has a concept known as 'legacy code,' meaning old stuff that is left in software programs, even after they are revised and updated, so that they will still work with older operating systems. The equivalent exists in newspaper stories, which are written to accommodate readers who have just emerged from a coma or a coal mine. Who needs to be told that reforming health care (three words) involves "a sweeping overhaul of the nation's health care system" (nine words)? Who needs to be reminded that Hillary Clinton tried this in her husband's administration without success? Anybody who doesn't know these things already is unlikely to care. (Is, in fact, unlikely to be reading the article)," Kinsley states.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-06 22:08

News of the World, known for publishing salacious details of celebrities' lives, has been cleared of charges it hacked the mobile telephones of various subjects in search of bombshell coverage, Agence France-Presse today reported.

The investigation by the UK Press Complaints Commission followed The Guardian's report in July that Rupert Murdoch's News Group Newspapers, which publishes News of the World, had paid out more than £1 million to settle legal cases that threatened to reveal evidence of the tabloid's repeated use of criminal methods to get stories.

In August 2006, a News of the World editor and a private investigator were jailed after members of the royal family told Scotland Yard that certain stories about them must have been sourced from voicemail messages on their mobile phones, The Guardian today reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-09 17:58

Under the banner, "Our precarity is your disinformation," the 600,000 member-journalists in 116 countries of the International Federation of Journalists have declared today to be the International Day in Defense of Journalists, the Madrid Press Association announced Monday on its Web site.

In support of that campaign, Spanish journalists have advised they would "take to the streets" at noon "in defense of media professionals' employment rights" and the public's right to quality, credible news reporting. A journalism school in Catalunya also promised to picket in solidarity at San Jaume Plaza during the same hour.

A further public protest is planned for Thursday, November 11, by the staff of 20 Minutos, a free national tabloid, 233 Grados reported last month. According to PR Noticias, 20 Minutos staff interrupted a management meeting in late October to announce their particular strike and demand the leadership's resignation for failing to generate profits while ignoring staff writers' proposals on doing so.

The tabloid's staff - which stood at 340 a year ago - has been reduced by 140, with more cuts in the online division underway, Press Digital reported in October.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-05 17:00

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