Date

Fri - 15.12.2017


Editorial sharing

Trinity Mirror is to merge the editorial teams of the Manchester Evening News and its 22 weekly sister titles, leading to up to ten job losses, it was reported yesterday. MEN Media was bought from the Guardian Media Group by Trinity Mirror in February this year.

The move is part of a push to boost multimedia and user generated content, and will see the creation of a single editorial team with teams of reporters assigned to cover specific geographic areas producing multimedia content for MEN Media titles, according to the Guardian. There will be a training programme to help reporters make the shift to multimedia, and new equipment will be bought. There will be a single management structure to lead the newsroom and place more emphasis on content creation.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-13 20:47

Top news organisations will collaborate to publish a series of articles on how American businesses are responding to liabilities, risks and opportunities surrounding climate change, Foliomag reports. The Atlantic, Mother Jones and Wired, along with Slate, Grist, the Center for Investigative Reporting and PBS current-affairs program "Need to Know" have teamed up to launch Climate Desk, a project dedicated to exploring climate change issues.

This collaboration represents an important step towards resolving the difficulty of covering expansive topics under dwindling resources. Climate Desk hopes to reach a combined online audience of more than 25 million monthly unique visitors, 1.5 million print readers and an expected TV audience of 1.5 viewers.

The Atlantic editorial director Bob Cohn told Folio in an interview that "Pooling resources, whether it's money or reporters or technology, can make good sense for outfits that want to remain ambitious in lean times. We all still want to beat the other guy, but sometimes the best way to unpack a complex and multi-dimensional story may be to forge ties with like-minded colleagues."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-20 19:37

The San Francisco Chronicle has entered into a content sharing agreement with Bloomberg and will expand its daily business news section, the California daily reported yesterday.

The new daily business section, called "Business Report," will be produced jointly by the Chronicle staff and the Bloomberg news team. Beginning Sunday, it will feature stories drafted by Chronicle reporters and content from the Bloomberg news service, in both the print edition of the Chronicle and Web sites of both groups, the San Francisco Business Journal reported. Financial details about the deal have not been disclosed by either party.

According to the Chronicle, the collaboration is the first of its kind in the United States, with Bloomberg producing stories, graphics and photos specifically for the Chronicle, along with data packages that focus on Bay Area's largest industries that include technology, biotechnology and financial services.

"By working with Bloomberg, the world's largest and most trusted information source for business news and reporting, we intend the Chronicle's daily business section to be an essential read for business, financial and technology coverage of Silicon Valley and the Bay Area," Frank Vega, Chronicle Chairman and Publisher stated in a press release.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-26 19:33

Most local news still originates from newspaper reports, according to a review of 53 media outlets - including newspapers, TV, radio and Web-only news operations - by the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism. Sixty-one percent of original reporting and new information on six top stories came from print newspapers and their Web sites in the week of July 19-25 in Baltimore, according to the content analysis study.

The "modern news 'ecosystem'" in the average U.S. city overwhelming relies on newspapers, while "much of the 'news' people receive contains no original reporting. Fully eight out of 10 stories studied simply repeated or repackaged previously published information. And of the stories that did contain new information, nearly all, 95%, came from traditional media - most of them newspapers. These stories then tended to set the narrative agenda for most other media outlets."

Although this study makes it clear how much the media relies on newspapers, it also shows us how much we stand to lose if economic woes continue to hurt the industry.

Currently local newspapers offer much less news than they once did. In 2009, The Baltimore Sun produced 32 percent fewer articles "on any subject" than in 1999, and 73 percent fewer than in 1991 (although at that time, the newspaper still published a morning and evening newspaper with competing newsrooms), according to the study.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-11 21:46

A non-profit news organisation in Chicago, made up by former Chicago Tribune staffers, will be responsible for two pages of local news for The New York Times's Chicago edition, which will begin publication in November, New York Times journalist Richard Perez-Pena reported today. The organisation, called the Chicago News Cooperative, is being supported by funding from a public television station and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

"The New York Times' strategy and intent is to provide local content to our existing readers in the Chicago metropolitan area," said Scott Heekin-Canedy, president of The New York Times, according to Crain's Chicago Business. "It will enhance our circulation retention and maybe even grow it a little bit."

Key players in the new Cooperative include Tribune alumni Ann Marie Lipinski, former editor; James Warren, a former managing editor; James O'Shea, former managing editor and former editor of the Tribune-owned Los Angeles Times. Lipinski will serve with Peter Osnos, former journalist and founder of PublicAffairs books, on the advisory board. O'Shea will be the editor and Warren will write a column.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-22 22:47

AOL's programming unit Media Glow has hired five newspaper journalists and one senior editor to work for its sports blog FanHouse, paidContent reported Sunday.

The staff additions are seen as a strategic move by the company, which seeks to capitalise on the lack of news coverage in areas that have been affected by newspaper closures and layoffs.

AOL programming SVP Marty Moe told paidContent writer David Kaplan that AOL doesn't "take any joy in the turmoil currently happening at newspapers, but we do see an increased role for FanHouse, as well as other channels." Reports say that FanHouse could hire more writers, as the site gets ready to cover the baseball season in the United States.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-30 14:10

Oklahoma's largest two newspapers announced they will share some news content, including some reporting and news gathering work, Tulsa Today reported Monday.

The Oklahoman and Tulsa World made the announcement Friday, and stated poor economic conditions led to their decision to share some news articles, photos and other content to better serve readers across the state, with less money.

The two newspapers have had to cut staffing levels, and the content-sharing plan is hoped to "make sure the level of coverage doesn't drop," Ed Kelley, editor of The Oklahoman, told Tulsa Today.

Content created by staff at The Oklahoman be available for Tulsa World to use in its print version and on its Web site, tulsaworld.com. Meanwhile, Tulsa World content will be available for The Oklahoman to use in its print version and on its Web site, NewsOK.com, according to Tulsa Today. The content, when used by the other paper, will be attributed to its content creator.

Both U.S. papers are independently owned, and will be careful to maintain their "separate voices on their editorial and opinion pages, as well as their individual approaches to gathering news," Kelly said, according to Tulsa Today.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-01-26 21:30

Rival newspapers The Dallas Morning News and Fort Worth Star-Telegram will team up for some of their sports coverage to cut expenses and duplication of work, The Associated Press reported Tuesday.

In autumn 2008, the two papers also signed a joint distribution agreement, and at the end of the year began sharing some photos and arts coverage.

The Morning News will cover basketball team the Dallas Mavericks and hockey team the Dallas Stars, and that coverage will be available to the Star-Telegram. Meanwhile, the Star-Telegram will cover the Texas Rangers baseball team and that coverage will be available to The Morning News. However, the teams will not share their largest beat, that of the Dallas Cowboys football team, or sports columnists or investigative stories, the AP reported in a story posted by The Morning News.

Coverage of some university teams and other sports will also be shared.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-01-14 02:51

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