WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Wed - 26.11.2014


ethics

WikiLeaks' latest leak, which is calls 'The Global Intelligence Files' is not as yet particularly interesting because of the content of the files, but because of the fact that WikiLeaks is back, and because of the partnerships that the episode reveals.

WikiLeaks claims to have created an online database of more than five million emails from Stratfor, a global intelligence company based in Austin, Texas, sent between July 2004 and December 2011. Stratfor provides its subscribers with geopolitical analysis via emails and explains on its site how it differentiates itself from news organisations.

For more on this story, please see our sister publication www.editorsweblog.org.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-28 18:42

Getting paid by advertisers to produce content for your magazine, newspaper, radio station or website is a major growth area, publishers say, but it is vital that rules are in place to protect editorial integrity.

With the line between advertising and editorial becoming increasingly blurred, the Association of Online Publishers has taken an interest in how media outlets can take advantage of branded content without losing readers' trust.

Continue reading on journalism.co.uk

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-02-21 10:05

Newspapers are generally regarded for their roles in societies as giving citizens a tool to better monitor their governments and other officials, and pushing for progress and promoting free speech. One newspaper in Uganda, operating on the opposite end of the spectrum, has been ordered to stop publishing the names of citizens it says are gay, according to a Reuters report, posted yesterday by the Irish Times.

The newspaper, called Rolling Stone, last month published the names and photos of citizens it said were homosexual, and called on authorities to put them to death. The headline was called "Men of Shame Part II," and followed the publication last month of 100 other people it alleged were gay.

Image: AP, via the Guardian

The Sexual Minorities Uganda group petitioned the country's high court to close the publication, as it was opening up innocent people to discrimination at the least, and violence at the worst, Frank Mugisha, chairman of the group, told Reuters.

Under Ugandan law, homosexuality is outlawed. Several people in the list published by Rolling Stone experienced harassment, according to the Guardian.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-02 16:32

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