WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Fri - 31.10.2014


Flipboard

When aggregation/news-reading apps are first launched, their founders tend to emit a hazily rose-tinted view of future revenue prospects. Flush with venture capital, a fledgling startup’s first priority is not to decide whether a lucrative future lies with a freemium model, paid subscriptions, and/or targeted advertising; its initial goal is to provide the best possible service and to build an “audience of significant scale”– the rest will (hopefully) fall into place. This is no longer the case for Flipboard and Pulse, two major apps in this category, which have each been around for over two years and have attracted 20 million users respectively. No longer hatchlings, these companies are entering the phase of concretizing their revenue plans, and the strategies they have selected are sharply divergent.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-12 18:29

The news that The New York Times will soon be publishing its entire content on Flipboard seems to signal a decisive change in the way in which traditional press and media companies engage with their audiences. From this Thursday, the entire content of the NYT will be available to subscribers, whilst non-subscribers will be able to read a limited amount of articles found in the paper’s Top News section.

The partnership with Flipboard is quite a departure from the Times's previous stance on its digital content. In the past it was necessary to have a subscription to see more than 10 NYT articles, and its digital version could only be viewed via the paper’s apps and website or by reading excerpts quoted by third parties. Explaining why a company that had previously guarded its digital content so jealously has made such a bold move, Denise F. Warren, general manager of The New York Times’s website points out that in a survey of the paper’s subscribers 20 percent of those asked used third-party aggregation apps like Flipboard. The deal still leaves the paywall system in place, but leading figures at the paper hope that allowing partial access to certain articles will encourage many who have not subscribed already to do so.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-26 17:27

The mobile newsreader app Flipboard announced this week that it is partnering with SoundCloud, NPR and PRI in order to fully integrate audio content into its app. The new feature will allow Flipboard users to listen to music and radio content while flipping through articles.

The BBC points out that Flipboard is the first mobile reading app of its kind to integrate audio in this way. Although other social readers such as Pulse and Zite may include some links to audio elements, Flipboard is the first to make audio content an integral part of its product.

As the company explains in its press release, the new feature allows users to explore audio content, select tracks and listen to them, then continue to flip through text stories. Audio tracks are sorted into sections, and the app will continue to play though all the tracks in the same category as users read articles. "With this latest addition, we're giving our readers a personal soundtrack to their Flipboard," says the company’s founder Mike McCue.

The BBC writes that Flipboard is hoping its new audio content will help boost ad revenue. “Adding audio is an attempt at reeling in users and keeping them around longer in a bid, ultimately, to attract brand advertising,” the article says.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-16 17:45

The popular social newsreader Flipboard has announced that it's adding a new feature to its iPad app: Cover Stories.

Cover Stories, previously only available on Flipboard's mobile app, is a feature that picks links most likely to be relevant to users' interests based on what their friends are sharing and what they've previously read.

Daniel Terdiman at CNET writes that the feature learns from users' behaviour, so that the more they visit, the more relevant articles Flipboard can deliver. Terdiman quotes his colleague Rafe Needleman, who said that Cover Stories "did a good job of finding articles I didn't know about and that I would be interested in reading."

But Robert Andrews at paidContent questions the decision to launch Cover Stories on the iPad. "Since Cover Stories was designed to cater to more time-pressed mobile users, its appearance on iPad, which gets longer read times from leanback readers, seems unusual," he writes.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-01 17:49

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