Date

Thu - 24.07.2014


future of newspapers

After the high-profile merger of publishing giants Penguin and Random House comes a development in regional news with a significance that belies its parochial implications. Former Mirror Group chief executive David Montgomery is reportedly involved in talks to consolidate the local news assets of Northcliffe Media (regionals arm of the Daily Mail & General Trust), Trinity Mirror and Iliffe News and Media (parent company Yattendon Group) within his own venture, Local World, which he would lead, and of which he would be a part stake-holder. Such a scheme would not only provide evidently beneficial economies of scale, but would combine the number one, four and eleven publishers in UK regional news in an industry that is barely keeping its head above water.

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-10-30 18:50

In a business climate of plummeting advertising and circulation revenue that has seen editorial budgets slashed, newsroom functions outsourced, legacy obligations become an ever increasing burden and print days reduced, you might be forgiven for thinking that the future of newspapers was cause for concern for editors and owners.

However, a survey conducted by the Missouri School of Journalism’s Reynolds Journalism Institute (RJI) has revealed remarkable levels of optimism in the newsrooms of U.S. daily newspapers – and significant faith in the power of print.

The RJI held telephone interviews with 485 news publishers and senior newspaper executives, who together represent one-third of the daily news titles in the U.S., as part of its annual Publishers Confidence Index. Full details of the report’s findings on the state of print and digital revenues, online news and mobile devices will be released in the coming months but a statement released by the RJI on 13 September attests to the ongoing importance of print publications in an industry widely thought to be preparing for a digital future.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-14 15:40

Every newsroom should have its own seer. Not to predict the next breaking news story (that’s half the fun of being a journalist, surely?) but to foresee how the newspaper model will change and adapt in the future. Keeping a news title abreast of the latest technological and economic challenges is part and parcel of an editor’s role, and is a task that has been rendered all the more urgent over the past two decades as technological advances and a difficult economic climate.

Even without the services of an in-house sibyl, editors have long been second-guessing how content production, publication and delivery will evolve – sometimes with alarming success. The Kaiser memo, written in 1992 by then- managing editor of The Washington Post, Robert Kaiser, is startlingly accurate in many of its predictions. After being told of an impending digital revolution by leading lights in the world of technology, who spoke with certainty of a time when “the PC will be a virtual supercomputer, and the easy transmission and storage of large quantities of text, moving and still pictures, graphics,” Kaiser recommended that the Post get ahead of its competitors by designing “the world’s first electronic newspaper… with a series of ‘front pages’ and other devices that would guide readers the way our traditional cues do -- headlines, captions, story placement, etc.”

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-31 18:17

The government of Burma has taken a major step towards freedom of expression according to a report from The Associated Press and published on the Guardian's website. The country has stopped the practice of requiring reporters to submit their articles to state censors before they can be published.

Rachel McAthy on the journalism.co.uk website offers an interesting look at eight examples of long-form digital content projects.

Recovering Journalist Mark Potts highlights a vision for the future of newspaperwritten 20 years ago by Robert G. Kaiser, the then-newly appointed Managing Editor of The Washington Post, which as Potts points out, remains "a striking document, even today."

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-20 19:19

Following years of retreat in the face of shrinking readership, mounting financial losses, and a rising chorus of digital visionaries telling them they're doing it all wrong, 2012 will be a year of retrenchment for newspaper publishers.

Still standing some three years after the near-implosion of the newspaper industry in 2008 and 2009, executives will point to their continued existence as proof that their situation was never as bad as it seemed, and that a few tweaks here and there will restore them to pink-cheeked, if downsized, health.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-22 18:33

Theory alone won't change any business's fortunes. To succeed, you need the guts to put radical ideas into action. On this basis, perhaps we can all learn a thing or two from John Paton, the 54-year old Denver-based publisher who is trying to turn around America's second-largest regional newspaper chain.

When it comes to newspapers, strategists don't typically look to the struggling US industry for inspiration. Instead, they seek out innovation in Oslo, Mumbai or even London, where the Economist argues that Britain's national newspapers have become "exceptionally innovative".

Continue reading on TheMediaBriefing

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-15 18:23

by John Bethune

If I were asked to name one active blogger that every B2B journalist should follow, I would probably suggest Adam Tinworth. For more than eight years, the British trade press editor has blogged about journalism, social media, and much more on One Man and His Blog. His insights there are based on a combination of his ongoing and enthusiastic experimentation with new-media platforms and his practical experience as an editor and blog evangelist for the UK branch of Reed Business Information (RBI).

Continue reading on B2B Memes

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-12 10:47

Year after year, the "State of the News Media"-report of the Project for Excellence in Journalism paints a bleak picture of our media future. In the eighth installment of VOCER's interview series, director Tom Rosenstiel looks at the bright side and talks about good times still to come.

From vocer.de

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-08 10:45

by Clay Shirky

Dean Starkman has written a lengthy piece in the Columbia Journalism Review, assessing the writings of a group of us he calls the "Future of News" movement. That essay, Confidence Game, focuses principally on Jay Rosen and me, both of NYU's Carter Institute, and Jeff Jarvis of CUNY, though noting some similarity of vision with Emily Bell of Columbia, Dan Gillmor of Arizona, and John Paton, publisher of the Journal-Register Company. (Unmentioned fellow travelers include, mutatis mutandis, Steve Yelvington, Chris Anderson, Amanda Michel, Steve Buttry, Jonathan Stray, and Alan Mutter.)

Continue reading on clayshirky.com

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-05 19:16

Feeling a little stressed about tomorrow? Given the stress of company budgeting, the stress of wider economies turned upside down, the stress of stress itself (Time helpfully chirped in this week with an "Anxiety: Why It's Good for You" cover this week), many media tomorrows have turned out to be less fun than the days preceding them. Tomorrow just seems to offer a tougher challenge than today.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-05 12:03

Syndicate content

© 2014 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation