WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Wed - 01.10.2014


Google

Today, Apple CEO Tim Cook is expected to show the world the iPad’s mini me, following (as ever) months of hypothesising and (for once) the competition: Amazon and Google have already achieved success in the tiny tablet market with their Kindle Fire and Nexus 7 devices.

The Apple keynote will take place at 10 am PST in San José, California. “We have a little more to show you,” read the invitations, sent one week ago, seemingly substantiating the speculation that has been ricocheting across the web at least since February, when “the first credible rumour” of a mini iPad came from the Wall Street Journal. Taking place at the California Theatre, the unveiling event will likely be modest relative to Microsoft’s “no-expenses-spared” launch of its Surface tablet in New York, scheduled for Thursday, October 25.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-23 16:53

If reports in this morning’s Daily Telegraph are accurate, News International’s frosty relationship with Google may be thawing.

After two self-imposed years in the wilderness, quality news titles owned by Rupert Murdoch’s British publishing division could find themselves re-included in Google search results as soon as next month.

The Times and The Sunday Times websites were originally removed from Google’s search index at the same time that paywalls were introduced at the thetimes.co.uk (then timesonline.co.uk), as part of News Int.’s attempts to stop users accessing content for free. Murdoch’s objection to consumers viewing premium content free of charge is no secret, and the media mogul hasn’t pulled any punches in his criticisms of Google’s operating policies.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-26 15:19

France’s Union of the National Daily Press (SPQN) is taking a keen interest in a draft law, approved by Germany’s cabinet last week, which would require aggregators such as Google News that reproduce snippets of text from news articles to pay a copyright fee to publishers, reported Le Monde on Tuesday.

The German draft law, backed by major publishing houses Axel Springer and Bertelsmann, has been nicknamed the “Lex Google” in France. Initially put forth by the Federation of German News Publishers, its intention is to allow publishers to recover some of the advertising revenue that they say is lost to aggregators who reproduce “pirated” content from news organizations’ websites as teasers on their news pages.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-05 13:16

What do a YouTube video satirising Pakistan’s army, an article criticising the Polish Agency for Enterprise Development, and a video of a Canadian citizen peeing on his passport have in common? They were all the objects of government requests to remove content from Google sites during the second half of 2011, says Google.

The company has just released its latest round of data, documenting demands made by governments to remove content from its sites or to turn over information about its users. Google, which began publishing this data as part of its Transparency Report in 2010, expressed concern as it noted that, for the fifth six-month period in a row, it has received requests from governments to remove political content. What’s more, the demands didn’t just come from countries with a traditionally poor press freedom record, but from Western democracies too.

“Unfortunately, what we’ve seen over the past couple years has been troubling, and today is no different,” wrote Google’s Senior Policy Analyst Dorothy Chou in a blog post about the data. “It’s alarming not only because free expression is at risk, but because some of these requests come from countries you might not suspect—Western democracies not typically associated with censorship.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-18 16:22

According to Google, the question that businesses should be asking isn’t whether or not to invest in mobile, but how. And Google is right there to provide the answers with the release of The Mobile Playbook, Mashable reports.

Coauthored by Google’s Head of Mobile Sales and Strategy Jason Spero and Senior Product Marketing Manager for Mobile Ads Johanna Werther, The Mobile Playbook: The Busy Executive’s Guide to Winning with Mobile asks “five crucial mobile questions” that business executives should explore: How does mobile change our value proposition? How does mobile impact our digital destinations? How is our organization adapting to mobile? How should our marketing adapt to mobile? How can we connect with our tablet audience?

Addressing each question, the Playbook also offers several strategies that businesses can use to understand their mobile potential, including using focus groups and surveys to get a sense of their audiences’ mobile habits. Additionally, the guide features case studies of various companies that have been using mobile technology successfully.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-26 17:32

Not all paywalls are created equal: RR Donnelly’s Press+ announced yesterday that it would extend a grandfather clause to Google One Pass subscribers after Google closed its paid content platform on Friday, according to a press release.

Press+, a metered paywall platform which launched in 2009, currently has over 300 publications on its service, including newspapers from McClatchy and Tribune Co., as we previously reported. With the Press+ model, publishers allow users on average access to 5-15 articles per month, after which users must subscribe in order to view content. 

“We will maintain subscriber accounts for whichever publishers might have signed on with Google without charging our usual revenue share,” said Press+ cofounder Steven Brill in the press release. “We’ll only charge for all the new customers we generate going forward once our seamless transition is completed.”

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-24 12:43

Google+ has come in for a lot of flack. It’s been called a “ghost town” by various news organisations and one viral image explaining social networks through the medium of donuts (of all things!) implied that while every other social platform serves a obvious purpose, the only people using Google+ were Google+ employees.

Speaking at the Social Media World Forum in London today, Chris Brogan, president of Human Business Works and author of Google Plus for Business, makes the case that businesses – and by extension publishers – should be thinking about Google+.

Brogan argues:

1)   Google is the biggest search engine in the world. But Google knows that links aren’t the only way people go to content, so it’s building its social presence. Google has been forcibly integrating Google+ into its search results through “social search plus your world” (although the function can be turned off) which means that what people’s friends say about your brand on Google+ affects how visible your search is. Don’t miss out on that business.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-27 12:05

News organisations that wish to expand and improve their social media presence might want to take a page from the Google playbook.

Speaking at WAN-IFRA's 7th Middle East Conference in Dubai, Maha Abouelenein, Head of Communications for Google in the Middle East, had some advice for news organisations, based on Google's experience. Here are some of Google's insights:

- Focus on the user. "Google builds the products, but users decide what is successful and what is not," says Ms Abouelenein.

- Empower others. "Everyone has a mobile phone with a camera on it, so people expect to view things now, live. The truth is at their fingertips to broadcast news to the world."

- Ideas come from everywhere. "We have a policy of spending 20 per cent of our time - one day a week - outside of the core job. I challenge you to spend 20 per cent of your time thinking about the newsroom of the future."

- Think big, but start small.

- Never fail to fail. "Google fails a lot. How we take these failures and learn and grow makes us better, more friendly for our readers."

- Launch early and iterate often. "A lot of times, companies want to polish a product before they launch it. We don't do that at Google. We launch early, put it in the hands of users, update it. Users are the best to tell us how to make it more relevant."

Author

Larry Kilman's picture

Larry Kilman

Date

2012-02-29 14:05


As everyone from businesses to governments to individuals go digital, the amount of raw data being recorded and stored is growing at a dizzying rate. Often this data contains useful information that it is in the public interest to analyse, but it exists in a format that very few people can understand. The solution to the problem? Find experts who can convert large amounts of data into easily accessible stories. In other words, find data journalists.



These are some of the ideas fuelling Danish daily Dagbladet Information's new initiative, Nordisk Nyhedshacker 2012 ("Nordic News Hacker 2012"). The project, run in collaboration with The Guardian, Google and Syddansk Universitet's Center for Journalism, invites journalists or data experts to create a piece of data journalism - which could be anything from a data mash-up to a new mobile app - and submit it to a panel of judges. The creator of the winning entry will be given a $20,000 scholarship by Google and will be invited to work with the Guardian Data Blog in London for one month. The Center for Journalism contributes by advertising the competition and incorporating elements of data journalism into its curriculum.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-22 19:07

Next year will be the year that the big technology companies go after local publishing and broadcasting businesses more fiercely than ever before. Most local media companies have no idea what's about to hit them - much less a plan to respond.

Google already has feet on the street from Portland to New York City to sell search advertising and directory listings to small and medium business (SMBs).

Continue reading on Reflections of a Newsosaur

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-15 09:58

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