Date

Mon - 28.07.2014


iPad

After only five issues as a paid-for app, The Huffington Post’s tablet magazine Huffington will now be completely free to download.

The magazine was welcomed into the world with a rooftop party at the Gramercy Park Hotel in New York and presented as a premium content product; a single issue was priced at 99 cents and consumers could buy monthly and annual subscriptions for $1.99 and $19.99 respectively. Speaking to reporters after the magazine’s launch, Executive Editor Tim O’Brien explained the decision to charge for access to content, saying: "We feel it's a premium product and it deserves to carry a price with it in order to access all the value we're giving people."

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-03 17:11

It was supposed to herald the start of a digital publishing revolution. Instead Rupert Murdoch’s The Daily, the world’s first digital newspaper designed exclusively for the iPad, is rumoured to be facing closure.

In an article for the New York Observer on the effects of News Corp’s recent cuts, Kat Stoeffel reports on rumours that the digital publication has been put “on watch” and will discover its fate after the US presidential elections on November 6th.

Although as yet unconfirmed, if proven to be true the news is unlikely to come as much of a surprise to those who have been closely following the digital title’s fortunes. The Daily launched on a wave of optimism at the beginning of February last year, introduced by Murdoch himself as the company’s answer to the changing world of journalism: “New times demand new journalism… and a new service edited and designed specifically for new devices. Our challenge is to take the best of traditional journalism…and combine it with the best of contemporary technology.”

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-12 16:54

Time Inc., the largest magazine company in the United States, has stopped resisting Apple. Striking a deal similar to that signed by its major competitors a year ago, the Time Warner-owned publisher agreed on Wednesday to sell subscriptions to all 20 of its titles, which include high-circulation weeklies such as Time, People and Sports Illustrated, through the Newsstand section of Apple’s iOS App Store.

The decision represents a considerable change of heart for a publisher that was “once the magazine industry’s most ardent opponent of selling subscriptions through Apple,” according to Amy Chozick of the New York Times.

Until now, Time Inc.’s readers have only been able to access single issues of the iPad editions of its magazines through the Newsstand app, with print subscribers alone receiving regular automatic uploads.

Time Inc.’s recalcitrance toward Apple since the launch of Newsstand last fall was motivated in part by the hard bargain that the technology giant drives with publishers. Beyond the profit share arrangement whereby Apple demands a contentious 30% commission on subscriptions purchased through its Newsstand, Apple’s previous unwillingness to share the personal information of iOS magazine subscribers with publishers was a deal-breaker for Time Inc.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-15 14:36

Not content with a soon-to-be-launched video streaming network and a host of new European editions, the Huffington Post is releasing a new weekly iPad magazine tomorrow named “Huffington.

The New York Times previews the new publication, noting that some content will be pulled from huffingtonpost.com, but other articles will also be “new and separate from that of the rest of the site”. The magazine, which is only available though the Apple store, will feature a mix of long-form pieces (of between 4,000 and 8,000 words), photos, commentary, reviews, illustrations, videos and data visualisations.

“From the beginning we wanted to do something that felt like a print magazine," says Huffington’s creative director Josh Klenert (formerly of Billboard), quoted by Joe Pompeo at Capital New York.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-13 18:07

Online newspapers tired of catering to Apple’s in-app purchasing restrictions are starting to bypass the tech giant completely by creating web-based apps using HTML5 technology, Journalism.co.uk reports. The latest title to jump on the trend? Washington’s local paper The Chronicle, which offers the HTML5 app as part of a subscription bundle that includes complete online and print access, the article said.

The Chronicle’s web app is similar to a “native” iPad app in terms of user experience; rather than downloading the app from Apple’s Newsstand, though, one can access the web app through the iPad’s Internet browser and save it as an icon on the homescreen, the article said. App users can share articles through Facebook and Twitter, as well as download stories to read them offline later, the article said.

CEO Scott Karp of Publish2, the platform that supports the Chronicle’s web app, told Journalism.co.uk the HTML5 version is a “seamless extension of the subscription model.” The Chronicle plans to launch an Android-friendly version of the app in the near future, according to the article.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-19 15:41

According to a report released by analytics company Distimo, the top 100 best-selling apps in Apple’s Newsstand for iPad garner about $70,000 per day, minonline.com reported

Newsstand, which organizes subscription-based apps for digital newspapers and magazines into a virtual newsstand on the iPad, launched six months ago and accounts for over 7% of the 200 top-selling apps in the app store, minonline said. Games still account for 50% of all top-selling apps, the report said.

Distimo app rankingsDistimo app rankings

The top five best-selling Newsstand apps in February were The Daily, NY Times for iPad, The New Yorker, National Geographic and Cosmopolitan, the article said.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-29 14:43

By Teemu Henriksson


Storify, one of the best-known tools for creating narratives based on social media, announced the launch of its iPad application today, Mediabistro reported. The new app, which is available free on iTunes, is aimed at making on-the-go social media curation even easier than before.

Storify opened to the public less than a year ago, and it has since become well-used way for reporters to organise and present information drawn from social media. As online readers and social media users are faced with a constant flood of information, the need for curation - creating accessible narratives out of the social media content - is becoming increasingly acute.

The new iPad app offers the same basic functionalities as the Storify web app, with two major differences: the touch-enabled, "iPad-like" interface and the ability to send tweets from within the app.

For more on this story, please see our sister publication www.editorsweblog.org

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-23 11:19

The Daily celebrates its first birthday today. When News Corp launched its tablet-only daily news publication on February 2, 2011, many in the industry had high hopes.

"News Corp. is redefining the news experience with The Daily. We think it is terrific and iPad users are really going to embrace it," said Steve Jobs, Apple's late CEO, at the time.

One year on, Josh Sternberg at Digiday has published an article about how The Daily has faired so far. At first, the answer seems to be that The Daily's first year has been bumpier than expected.

"There's been no shortage of critics of The Daily," writes Sternberg, "It's too expensive. It lacks a voice. The technology, at least initially, was wonky. It had several staff shakeups. And most of all, it hasn't proven itself a viable as a standalone business."

Rupert Murdoch said last February that The Daily needed 500,000 subscribers to make it 'viable'. It currently has a fraction of that: 100,000 paid subscribers and 250,000 monthly readers, according to Sternberg's article.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-02 14:12

When News International properties The Times and The Sunday Times of London put up hard paywalls in July 2010 it seemed like their digital strategy had been decided in favour of paying users and against sharing on the web. But now an interview with News International's digital product director Nick Bell, which appeared in Paid Content earlier this week, suggests that The Times is considering making its paywall ever-so-slightly leakier by allowing subscribers to share articles with their direct friends.

Bell is quoted in the article saying that sharing has been "a hotly-debated topic" at the Times headquarters.

He promises that, "over the next six months, you will see us rewarding our paying subscribers with the ability to share amongst their network.... If they want to share content with their direct friends, then we're going to enable that."

However, the author of the Paid Content article, Robert Andrews, stresses that this is not a guarantee that Times content will be free for friends of subscribers. Bell is clear that The Times is not about to switch to a metered paywall like that of the New York Times, but is only interested in giving ""more value to our paying customers."

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-20 16:10

As print sales across Europe decline, what's a paper to do? As we reported earlier this week, taking advantage of different types of media is one option.

Swiss national daily Tages-Anzeiger has taken a step in this direction with the launch of a TV streaming app for iPad called TV Sélection. The paper is offering its users a choice of TV programs, feature movies and documentaries from over 100 channels hosted through TV streaming service Zattoo.

Why would users go to the app, rather than straight to Zattoo itself? This is where the editorial experience of the Tages-Anzeiger kicks in. Journalists from the paper's culture section will curate and select the best programs to create what Computer World calls "a more personal experience" that eliminates "aimless channel-flicking".

Programs are stored on part of the app called 'Total Recall' and can be viewed for a limited period after they are first made available.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-18 19:21

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