WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Thu - 27.11.2014


journalism

"The collective intelligence of the newsroom is something we rarely exploit efficiently," writes Gavin Sheridan, Innovation Director of Storyful in a blog post where he discusses the concept of newsrooms as intelligence agencies.

On the Ebyline BlogSusan Johnston reports on the acceleration of paywalls at US newspapers based on the latest data from the Newspaper Association of America.

The Guardian reports that Twitter has suspended the account of Guy Adams, a journalist for the UK's Independent, who was critical of Olympics coverage by NBC.

"At the Financial Times, we recognized early on that the continued success of our business depended on our ability to adapt to changing reader habits," writes Rob Grimshaw of the FT in an article about "publishing in the age of social media" on The Economist Group's website.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-07-31 17:21

Kickstarter, the crowdfunding platform for creative projects, is fast becoming the go-to site for journalists and publishers searching alternative ways of financing projects. Originally conceived in 2009 as a means of financing new and innovative technology, the site has since branched out to become the biggest crowdfunding site in the world with more than 6300 projects and over $250 million raised in pledges. As news titles continue cutting staffing budgets and editorial budgets, an increasing number of writers and reporters are presenting their ideas directly to the Kickstarter public.

Of course, the use of crowdfunding in journalism is old news by now. Spot.Us has been allowing journalists to appeal to the goodwill and largesse of like-minded people since 2008 and is still going strong with more than 1500 contributors and 110 publishing partners, including The New York Times. Meanwhile Emphas.is continues to provide a platform for photojournalists and is even developing a photography book project for later this year. Neither however has scaled the heights of fame in the same way as Kickstarter.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-27 10:31

NBC is now the sole owner of msnbc.com, after completing a deal to buy Microsoft’s shares in the news website on Sunday. Comcast, the company that controls NBC, apparently paid the technology giant $300 million for its 50% stake in msnbc.com, though the exact figure remains unconfirmed. Msnbc.com has swiftly been rebranded as NBCNews.com and users are now redirected to the new site and greeted with a welcome note from Editor-in-Chief Jennifer Sizemore. Rumours that the two companies were planning to part ways surfaced in March of this year, when Adweek reported that NBC was in “in serious negotiations with Microsoft to buy back MSNBC.com”.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-16 15:10

The Times-Picayune is changing. And not necessarily for the better.

The New Orleans title finds itself simultaneously cutting jobs and struggling to keep a hold on the talented journalists who contributed so much to the paper’s prestige. Earlier this year editor Jim Amoss revealed that more than 200 employees at The Times-Picayune will lose their jobs at the beginning of October, and in the newsroom alone 84 out of 173 reporters will find themselves unemployed after September 30th. What is more, from the second half of this year the once daily title will now only be printed three times a week. The bulk of the paper’s news content will be carried by the website Nola.com, run by Nola Media Group.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-09 15:50

Say what you like about Rupert Murdoch (and in the aftermath of the phone-hacking scandal, people often do) there’s no denying that his decisions continue to influence the world of media business. A week after News Corp announced that it is to separate his publishing interests from its other businesses, analysts have begun to question whether other media conglomerates ought to follow suit. Today’s Financial Times reports that questions are being asked as to whether Daily Mail and General Trust (DMGT) would benefit from taking similar action.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-05 17:05

He has yet to take up his new position, but George Entwistle, the soon-to-be Director General of the BBC, already faces calls from the National Union of Journalists to rethink the corporation’s six year licence fee freeze. In 2012, out-going DG Mark Thompson agreed that the licence fee would remain fixed at £145.50 until 2017, which translates to 16% real terms cut. Terms of the agreement saw the BBC agree to fund the World Service and BBC Monitoring, which analyses media coverage from around the world. 

The NUJ publicly criticised Thompson’s handling of the licence fee agreement, writing in an email to its members: “It is our view that the BBC should have fought these plans, and rallied its supporters, rather than accept such a devastating deal which could lead to thousands of job losses and the wholesale closure of services." In the months following the deal, the journalism board responsible for the management of BBC Journalism was dissolved and 650 World Service jobs were axed. In addition, BBC Online suffered a budget decrease of 25%, bringing about the loss of 360 jobs and a reduction in the number of news blogs on the site.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-05 14:02

The Chicago Tribune has become one of the latest major newspapers in the US to announce plans to introduce a paywall on its online site, behind which it will place “premium” content including in-depth reports and analysis, columnists and reviews.

At first glance, this may seem little different to action taken by various other news titles that have sought to maintain or increase revenue at a time when print subscriptions are diminishing. However, the Chicago Tribune is attempting to breathe new life into the process by offering its readers the opportunity to read selected articles from Forbes and The Economist as part of its new premium package. The announcement of a partnership between these three titles certainly seems to prove that Bill Adee (vice president for digital development and operations at the Chicago Tribune) and his team understand the need to offer something more than access to their usual articles and reviews in order to justify charging readers for content that was previously free to view online.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-27 16:07

The news that The New York Times will soon be publishing its entire content on Flipboard seems to signal a decisive change in the way in which traditional press and media companies engage with their audiences. From this Thursday, the entire content of the NYT will be available to subscribers, whilst non-subscribers will be able to read a limited amount of articles found in the paper’s Top News section.

The partnership with Flipboard is quite a departure from the Times's previous stance on its digital content. In the past it was necessary to have a subscription to see more than 10 NYT articles, and its digital version could only be viewed via the paper’s apps and website or by reading excerpts quoted by third parties. Explaining why a company that had previously guarded its digital content so jealously has made such a bold move, Denise F. Warren, general manager of The New York Times’s website points out that in a survey of the paper’s subscribers 20 percent of those asked used third-party aggregation apps like Flipboard. The deal still leaves the paywall system in place, but leading figures at the paper hope that allowing partial access to certain articles will encourage many who have not subscribed already to do so.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-26 17:27

In the wake of the events that lead to the on-going Leveson inquiry into press practices, one news organisation is attempting to prove that investigative journalism can be both ethical and capable of generating a profit. Conceived by Mark Watts, current Editor-in-Chief, PR executive Tim Pendry and media finance specialist David Baxter, Exaronews.com is a subscription-based site that aims to eschew the “churnalism” that it claims dominates mainstream media outlets in favour of the rigorous investigative practices used by journalists of old. In the relatively short amount of time that has passed since the site’s launch in October 2011, Exaro has uncovered numerous scandals, including the widespread tax avoidance practiced by civil servants, which have subsequently been picked up by larger titles, including the Sunday Times and the Daily Mail.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-25 17:10

Newsrooms from Montreal to Denver are editing out their copy desks to keep up with digital’s dual imperative: tight deadlines and tighter budgets.

Monday’s announcement by Postmedia Network means that dozens of copy editing jobs will be axed across Canada in coming weeks; Twitter speculation has it that 23 editors will be let go at the Montreal Gazette alone, reports the Huffington Post Canada.

Yesterday, Postmedia's the National Post offered a warning of the perils of doing away with copy editors when it mistakenly published a crossword puzzle that had already been filled in, revealed Poynter.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-30 17:20

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