WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Sat - 30.08.2014


Kindle

With each introduction of a new reading device publishers around the world are overcome with the same recurring same fantasy: What if it worked, this time around? Could a reliable business model emerge for news publishing companies?

Last week's launch of new Kindles is no exception to the cyclic fantasy. For those who where on Mars last Wednesday, here is a look at the revamped family:

Continue reading on Monday Note

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-06 10:13

Amazon presented today the update for its Kindle for Android app, allowing readers to access more than 100 and magazines, Editor & Publisher revealed.

"Amazon has long offered access to newspaper and magazine content via its Kindle hardware devices, but this is the first time that functionality has been extended to third-party gadgets," explained Mashable.

The new app includes publications likes The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Economist and Reader's Digest, according to Amazon. Users can purchase single copies or subscribe content.

It also allows readers to share books, zoom in images and download recent issues of the publications they subscribe to.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-12-17 23:15

Amazon announced on Monday that it would give publishers as much as 70 percent of the revenues it collects from selling newspapers and magazines through its Kindle store, The New York Times reported.

The royalty increase will take effect on December 1 and will be calculated on the retail price minus the delivery costs, The Associated Press reported. However, to qualify for it, "publications must be able to be read on all Kindle devices and applications built for devices such as Apple's iPhone and the Blackberry," Agence France-Presse explained.

Image: Pulse 2

"A newspaper that delivers about 9 megabytes of content a month would pay about $1.35 in delivery costs, meaning a $9.99-per-month subscription would net a publisher $6.05 a month per subscription," according to the company, the AP reported.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-09 18:16

Being able to buy an issue or subscription on one device, and then access it across devices makes sense for device and app users. And, for the most part, it also makes sense for the makers of gadgets - Apple, Amazon, and others. However, it doesn't make sense for publishers looking to sell their own multi-platform subscriptions, paidContent's Staci Kramer wrote yesterday.

It is in the publisher's best interest to control their customer relationships and their brands across devices. Amazon announced its vision is to allow customers to "buy once, read everywhere" - a stance that could lead to content creators locking horns with device-makers.

Image via Melville House Publishing

For example, Kramer writes: "The NYT has invested considerable resources in an iPad app that eventually will be part of its metered plans. Selling subscriptions on the Kindle or Nook makes sense. Selling one that works on an iPad and competes with that, not so much."

Amazon has also said that in the future, it will allow users to lend e-books on the Kindle for 14 days, depending on the publisher's discretion, Retail Digital reported today.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-27 00:58

In the United States, owners of tablets like the iPad spend 75 percent more time reading newspapers than those without these gadgets, according to a survey conducted by the Harrison Group and publishing service company Zinio, the Los Angeles Times reported today.

Users of reading devices such as the Amazon Kindle also dedicate at least 50 percent more time on newspapers and 45 percent more time reading books. The study explained users make up the time by watching less television and going online less, PRNewswire revealed.

"For years, our consumer research has demonstrated the growing demand for digital reading. The ease of access, the convenience of content storage and now the high quality of the screen experience makes reading fast and fun," said Jeanniey Mullen, executive vice president and chief marketing officer of Zinio.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-05 23:03

Following the iPad's big splash into the tablet market this spring, today Amazon cut the price of its e-reader, the Kindle, while Barnes & Noble reduced the price of its Nook.

Both e-readers previously sold for US$259. Now, the Nook's pricetag is $199 and the Kindle is $189; Barnes & Noble has also launched a Wi-Fi-only Nook for $149. Comparatively, the iPad's lowest-priced version is $499.

Both devices are less sleek than the iPad, lacking a colour screen, apps, or capability to play video, for example. However, the price cuts could be what the e-reader platform needs in order to become more mainstream, the Wall Street Journal reports.

At the same time, a "price war for low-end e-readers could force Barnes & Noble and Amazon to rely more heavily on their profit from selling e-books. Under so-called agency sales agreements with many top publishers, e-bookstores keep about 30% of the sale price of e-books," the WSJ's Geoffrey A. Fowler writes.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-23 00:23

As part of its digital expansion strategy, Abu Dhabi Media Company last week announced the launch of its newspaper The National on Amazon Kindle. This makes ADMC the first Middle East publisher to digitise and distribute content to Amazon.

The Kindle subscription to the English-language daily costs US$9.99 in the United States and $13.99 outside the U.S., and includes a 14-day free trial.

The National's Kindle release is a way for the company "to advance our strategy of expanding access to our premium digital content to the widest possible audience. The computer is no longer the single entry-point for digital editions, and with Kindle publishers have an exciting platform to reach their audiences. This collaboration marks a significant step towards the future of our digital content delivery," Ricky Ghai, executive director of digital media at ADMC, stated in the press release.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-09 22:35

InformationWeek divulged Thursday that Amazon may have acquired Touchco, a touchscreen technology manufacturer. According to a New York Times (NYT) article from Wednesday "a person briefed on the deal" revealed that Amazon would be combining the manufacturer's technology and staff members into its California-based hardware division Lab126.

The acquisition was reportedly a step to boost Kindle's touch screen mechanism in light of the launch of Apple's new device iPad, said the Wall Street Journal. The iPad is thought to be better than Kindle because it has a more colourful screen and is easier to navigate.

Touchco uses "interpolating force-sensitive resistance" technology that is placed into display screens, pointed out NYT. The technology could be entirely transparent and could cost as little as US$10 per square foot. Capacitive touchscreens used in the iPad and iPhone are relatively more pricey and cannot detect a limitless amount of simultaneous touch points.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-02-04 16:31

As News Corp. announced profits of US$254 million over the three months up to December, Rupert Murdoch said his company is close to implementing online subscription models for all of its newspapers like the Times, the News of the World, and the Sun.

The company is also in "advanced negotiations" with handheld-device manufacturers about possible paywalls that would allow customers access to News Corp. content "whenever and wherever they want it," said Murdoch.

According to Murdoch, "ingenious and fabulous devices" like the iPad and the Kindle "would be unloved and unsold" without the creative content supplied by newspapers. "Content is not just king, it is the emperor of all things digital. We're on the cusp of a digital revolution from which our shareholders will profit handsomely," said Murdoch.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-03 19:20

E-readers, like the Amazon Kindle, likely won't help newspapers hold on to audiences, as younger users think the Kindle is "old" compared to smart phones, while older users prefer the experience a print version offers, a new study from the University of Georgia has found.

The Kindle doesn't have a touch screen and it can't surf the Internet, young adults pointed out. Older adults, meanwhile, pointed out that features like comics and crossword puzzles aren't available on e-reader devices, according to the six-month study by the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication. For the study, participants read the Atlanta Journal-Constitution on the Kindle and gave feedback.

Regardless of age, cost was a major factor. The Kindle DX costs US$489, and being able to read a newspaper on one is not enough to justify spending that amount of money, according to the study.

"We are in the first phase of the project which compares e-readers, such as the Kindle, to traditional newspapers and online delivery systems," Dean Krugman, a professor of advertising, said in a news release. "Our focus is on the way people consume media in a rapidly changing environment. Earlier, we employed similar methods when studying the growth of the multi-channel television environment."

Of course, when the iPad hits the market, the Kindle will experience major competition, as the study found that features like colour and touch screens are likely to win over more readers.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-30 00:41

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