Date

Fri - 15.12.2017


layoffs

The management of leading Spanish newspaper El País announced to staff on Friday a plan to lay off about 150 employees – or one third of staff – as part of a series of cutbacks to “guarantee the viability of the business in years to come.”

Other measures will include early retirement plans and salary cuts, announced Juan Luis Cebrián, President of the PRISA group and of El País, accompanied by directors of both the publishing group and the newspaper.

The managers called the cutbacks “painful” yet “inevitable,” citing a steep drop in revenue stemming from the contraction of the advertising market and reduced circulation. In the Spanish market, print advertising revenue has dropped by 53 percent and newspaper circulation by 18 percent over the last five years, directors told staff members.

“For every dollar that is made on the Internet, ten are destroyed in print,” said Cebrián. “It’s not a question of wanting to improve profitability. The newspaper can no longer support its current cost structure.”

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-08 17:42

Yahoo! is expected to lay off between 650 and 700 people today, or about 5 percent of its worldwide staff, AllThingsDigital reported yesterday.

The layoffs will come mostly from its product division, and will be mostly within the Internet company's U.S. division. A Yahoo employee in its Flickr group just tweeted this afternoon "All I got for Christmas from Yahoo is a pink slip. And hugs from Flickr. And a nice package. Adios, Y! Good luck on your downslide," TechCrunch reported. The tweet has since been deleted.

Image: TechCrunch

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-14 20:10

Thirty-three percent of Spain's free newspapers have reduced their personnel this year, a significant decline from the 50 percent that reported staff cuts in 2009, according to a survey conducted by the Spanish Association of Free Press, 233grados.com reported yesterday.

However, the study showed that 20 percent of the publications increased their staff numbers while 45 percent said their advertising revenue had declined. Last year, 79 percent reported advertisement losses.

According to the study, the biggest ad investors are the commerce and tourism sectors, which place ads in 76 percent of the Spanish free press. Other sectors include the automobile industry (34 percent), real estate (38 percent), mass consumption goods (31 percent) and banking (17 percent).

The increase in advertisement was offset by a 34 percent increase of advertising coming from education and health areas. Furthermore, 83 percent of the publications depend mostly on private ads, while only 17 percent relied heavily on the government.

The study surveyed 240 editors of free newspapers in the country.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-11 20:01

Ireland's oldest provincial newspaper, the Limerick Leader and Limerick Chronicle, have announced a review of the newspaper's printing operations in Limerick. If the proposals are implemented, the facility could be closed by mid-December and 29 people would be laid off, the Limerick Leader reported yesterday.

The staff has taken a 40 percent pay cut and opted for a three day week to keep the printing plant in operation, according to a report by RTE. The Unite trade union that represents the workers at the plant will be meeting with the management of Johnston Press, which owns the newspaper, in the coming days to explore alternative possibilities to closure or to secure a fair redundancy deal.

The company has said it will make "every effort to minimise the impact of this proposal on affected staff through, where possible, by re-deployment to alternative positions in the group," David Crow, divisional managing director of print for Johnston Press, told the Limerick Leader. "Despite the best efforts of the staff and management at Leader Print Limited, the unprecedented reductions in printing requirements across the industry has resulted in the company having to review its operations in Limerick."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-11-10 16:27

The Miami Herald announced Thursday that its parent company would cut 49 jobs, according to the AFP article posted on Google News.

Those jobs impacted include seven full-time and two part-time in the Miami Herald newsroom, four full-time and two part-time newsroom positions at its Spanish-language title El Nuevo Herald.

According to publisher David Landsberg in a letter to employees, "These actions come in response to the volatility of the economic recovery, a situation that is affecting many industries." He added that the job elimination is across all divisions through voluntary buyouts and involuntary layoffs, UPI reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-09-16 22:58

Canada's National Post offered voluntary buyouts to its entire staff as part of its Postmedia Network Inc. restructuring plan. The employees have until Friday to accept the proposal, which includes three weeks of pay for each year on the job up to a maximum of C$125,000, The Globe and Mail informed yesterday.

"It's a decision at the local level, so National Post management developed a voluntary buyout program for their operation," Postmedia's director of communications Phyllise Gelfand said to Reuters.

Postmedia bought Canwest's newspaper division in July after the media group filed for bankruptcy. However, two weeks ago, the publisher announced a reduction of the staff in all its titles as a way to cut costs. So far, 50 workers have been laid off.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-09-15 19:24

The number of mainstream journalism jobs in the United Kingdom has been cut by between 27 percent and 33 percent over the past decade, settling at about 40,000, according to a report called "Laid Off," by the University of Central Lancashire and Journalism.co.uk.

At the same time, the number of journalism university graduates is on the rise and has never been higher, paidContent.co.uk points out. "The reality is that only a fraction of the many thousands of graduates from UK journalism courses will find a place in the mainstream industry," said François Nel, director of the Journalism Leaders Programme at UCLAN and primary author of the report. (Note: Nel is also an SFN research partner).

Although the journalists had experienced hard times, from pay cuts to layoffs, journalism was still found to be a rewarding profession, with almost 70 percent saying that they would still have chosen journalism as a career, even if they had known these difficult times were waiting.

"These voices can help inform media managers, union officials, policy makers, training bodies, educators, would-be journalists, those still working and, perhaps most importantly, the thousands of other journalists who have left - or have been forced out - of the profession," the report states.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-08 15:40

Postmedia Network Inc, which bought Canwest's newspaper division in July, has started to cut employees at some of its dailies as part of the company's restructuring process, The Globe and Mail reported Friday.

"Everyone is busy preparing budgets and they're reviewing their needs and their staffing components based upon the digital-first philosophy and any restructuring they have to do with respect to it," Postmedia chief executive officer Paul Godfrey told Canadian Business.

He declined to comment on the number of employees that will be affected by these measures. However, The Globe and Mail reported that 20 jobs have been cut at the Edmonton Journal and other 30 have been let go at the Calgary Herald.

"To meet the changing climate that all media are trying to meet it's going to involve some layoffs, and that's the unfortunate part," spokeswoman Phyllise Gelfand said in an interview with Canadia Business, while explaining that the cuts were going to vary among the dailies as each one is in change of its budget.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-09-06 15:59

After a large part of its funding was cut, the Michigan Catholic, one of the oldest newspapers in Detroit, has been forced to reduce its publication to every two weeks and has had to cut half of its staff, the Detroit Free Press reported yesterday.

"The move comes after the Archdiocese of Detroit eliminated the newspaper's [US]$250,000 annual subsidy. It's part of an overall reduction in staffing levels that have taken place in the archdiocese over the past year," the daily explained.

The revenues from advertising and subscriptions, which were roughly $1 million, were not enough to keep the weekly publication going.

"When we looked at the numbers, we really didn't have a choice," Ned McGrath, director of communications for the archdiocese, told the Detroit Free Press.

The Michigan Catholic was founded 1872 and it currently has a circulation of 22,000 copies.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-07-08 16:00

Since 2008, more than 166 newspapers in the United States have closed down or stopped publishing a print edition, according to Paper Cuts, SFN's Million Dollar Strategies for Newspaper Companies reported.

More than 39 titles did so in 2008, and the number rose to 109 in 2009. So far in 2010, more than 18 papers have closed down or stopped publishing a print version.

According to Paper Cuts, there have been nearly 35,000 job losses or buyouts in the U.S. newspaper industry since March 2007. From March to December 2007, more than 2,256 newspaper jobs have been reportedly eliminated or offered buyouts.

The numbers increased to more than 15,992 in 2008 and were at more than 14,783 in 2009. As of May 2010, there have been more than 1,797 job losses or buyouts in newspaper companies in the country, according to the report, Million Dollar Strategies for Newspaper Companies, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-07-05 20:25

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