Date

Wed - 30.07.2014


magazine

Not content with a soon-to-be-launched video streaming network and a host of new European editions, the Huffington Post is releasing a new weekly iPad magazine tomorrow named “Huffington.

The New York Times previews the new publication, noting that some content will be pulled from huffingtonpost.com, but other articles will also be “new and separate from that of the rest of the site”. The magazine, which is only available though the Apple store, will feature a mix of long-form pieces (of between 4,000 and 8,000 words), photos, commentary, reviews, illustrations, videos and data visualisations.

“From the beginning we wanted to do something that felt like a print magazine," says Huffington’s creative director Josh Klenert (formerly of Billboard), quoted by Joe Pompeo at Capital New York.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-13 18:07

In the digital age, are things looking good or gloomy for magazines? Economist brand platforms – which themselves represents a highly successful weekly magazine – argued both positions last week.

An article from The Economist’s print edition stated that magazine publishing has recently been suffused with a “new sense of optimism.” Most magazines rely less on classified advertising than newspapers, argues the piece, so they took less of a hit when the market moved online. They are capable of inspiring reader loyalty that is attractive to advertisers, continues the article, and they are harnessing digital technology in innovative ways.

The story acknowledges that the number of ad pages in US magazine has fallen for the third quarter running, but it asserts that digital advertising is an important growing market. “Once, digital ads would have been scant comfort. On the web they are typically worth a small fraction of what they were in print. But tablets, such as Apple’s iPad, could change this,” states the article, “there are signs that advertisers are accepting higher rates on tablets than on the web, because magazines on tablets are more like magazines in print: engrossing, well-designed experiences instead of forests of text and links.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-11 15:14

Financially speaking, this seems to have been a mixed week for the LA Times. On the one hand, Fishbowl LA reported on Tuesday that the LA Times Magazine, which has been running for almost three years in its current form, will shut down next month due to a tough market. On the other, the LA Times announced this Thursday that it has received $1m of funding from the Ford Foundation to strengthen its reporting of beats including immigration, minority communities and Brazil.

First to the bad news. Fishbowl LA quotes the editor of the LA Times Magazine, Nancie Clare, who attributes the closure to a lack of funds. “I think it’s fair to say there were revenue issues,” says Clare, “it’s still a tough economic climate, especially for print. I don’t think they got rid of us because they don’t like us.” Fishbowl LA writes that the monthly magazine’s seven staff will be laid off, and there’s “no indication” that jobs in other parts of the newsroom will be made available to them. “They’re contracting in the newsroom too. There’s nowhere to absorb us,” says Clare, quoted in the article.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-18 16:14

by Emma Heald

The future of the newspaper is in magazines, believes Jacek Utko, design director for Bonnier Business Press, which publishes newspapers in eight Central European countries. This is a trend that news organisations should embrace rather than fight, he added, speaking at the 5th Arab Free Press Forum in Tunis.

Print is still a highly relevant medium, Utko said, and publishers are increasingly realizing this as they have been disappointed by tablets as audience- and revenue-generators.

However, the print model at many news organisations - publishing website content the following day and charging for it - does not make sense, Utko claims. It is necessary to offer more than that if you want people to willingly pay for the product.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.editorsweblog.org

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-25 16:22

In mid December last year, 10% of adults in the US owned a tablet computer and 10% owned an ebook reader. According to a report published by PEW today, by early January this year both of these figures had jumped to 19%.

The same report estimated that the number of American adults who owned at least one tablet or eReader leapt from 18% in December to 29% in January.

Father Christmas's generosity seems likely to have a big impact on publishers. According to a poll by IDG Connect, 72% of 210 surveyed worldwide professionals say that they bought fewer newspapers after getting an iPad. According to the same research, as Paid Content reports, 70% of participants also said that they bought fewer books.

Although the sample data is small, the trends are obvious: tablet sales are booming, print is losing out.

The numbers are worrying for news organisations that still rely on print as their main source of revenue. The IDG Connect report notes that "for advertising- funded media (newspapers and magazines), the challenges are particularly substantial. Readers who can afford iPads tend to be more demographically desirable than those who cannot."

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-23 18:58

When the iPad launched, magazines rushed to shovel expensive rich-media features into their tablet editions. But now that they have to create editions for the new Kindle Fire and Nook Color and their ilk, some are downplaying the need for often-expensive enhancements.

Publishers say their research shows having a tricked-out app isn't the highest priority.

Continue reading on Adweek

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-01 10:54

After an initial wave of excitement about iPad magazines, some publishers have dialed back their enthusiasm. But the readers who have actually downloaded them like them quite a bit.

So says a survey commissioned by a publishers' trade group: It finds that two-thirds of people who read magazines on tablets and e-readers think they'll be spending more time with digital issues over the next year.

Continue reading on All Things Digital

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-23 11:05

by Frédéric Filloux

Do encapsulated digital editions make sense? Is the notion of having a "news container", similar to a newspaper or magazine, a relic of the past or is it still associated with quality journalism? In an era of instant information, is it worth proposing a self-contained, stop-motion shot of the news cycle?

For some, the reflexive answer involves market research, readers samplings and the like. I don't think so. I'd rather abide by one of Steve Jobs' sayings:

Continue reading on Monday Note

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-09-26 10:50

Instead of limiting its next app to one device like the iPad, Fortune magazine has built a new app to run inside web browsers on a variety of platforms. And although the app, called Fortune500+, will only run only on desktop and laptop browsers at first, it will soon run on tablet browsers too.

As a web app, Fortune500+ joins what seems to be a slowly rising tide of apps that run in web browsers instead of the operating systems of particular devices.

Continue reading on Ad Age Mediaworks

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-06 10:36

Time Inc., the country's largest magazine publisher, has reached a deal with Apple Inc. (AAPL) to make all its iPad editions free for print subscribers, marking a break in the impasse between publishers and Apple and lending support to Time's contention that it's business-as-usual after the ouster of its chief executive.

Starting Monday, subscribers to Sports Illustrated, Time and Fortune magazines will be able to access the iPad editions via the apps, which will be able to authenticate them as subscribers. Time Inc.'s People magazine already had such an arrangement, but readers of most publications have had to pay separately for the iPad version regardless of their subscriber status.

Continue reading on Morningstar

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-03 11:46

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