Date

Thu - 24.07.2014


mobile

Until now, Twitter may not have been considered a profitable company, but that is all to change. The popular micro-blogging enterprise will be able to notify the public of a small but present profit for 2009 thanks to US$15 million and $10 million deals with Google and Microsoft, respectively, PC World reported yesterday.

Twitter's deals with the two companies dictate that users' "tweets" be available on Google's search engine as well as the Microsoft-run Bing. It is not sure whether Twitter would depend on the two giants or whether it would be able to develop businesses to boost income (e.g. advertising or premium services), Reuters reported Monday.

According to Reuters, Twitter was aiming for only $400,000 in revenues during the third quarter of 2009 and for $4 million during the fourth. The information had been obtained by a hacker and was later published on the TechCrunch blog, the news wire reported.

Twitter recently obtained $100 million in funding, granting the company an overall value of approximately $1 billion. Analysts question the possibility of acquisition by Internet corporations such as Google, Yahoo or Time Warner's AOL, Reuters said.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2009-12-23 22:06

According to comScore's Mobile Benchmark Study, during the three month period ending November 2008, the most popular activities in the five countries surveyed were receiving SMS ads, sending/receiving photos or videos and listening to music, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

More than half of the mobile subscribers in Spain, France and Italy received SMS ads.

More than two out of 10 sent/received photos or videos on mobile phones in all the five countries surveyed.

In the United Kingdom, Spain and Germany, more than 20 percent of the mobile population listened to music on their mobile phones.

Accessing downloaded applications and social networking sites were not popular yet, reaching less than 10 percent across all the countries. However, they both grew steadily with a double-digit year-over-year increase, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-12-17 20:36

Snowballing multimedia trends are being harnessed by different companies in different ways to grow new revenue streams and better serve audiences, speakers told the third session of the World Newspaper Congress today.

Bharat Gupta, chairman, managing director and managing editor of Jagran Prakashan in India told the congress about "the making of the world's highest read newspaper." Sandy Prieto-Romualdez, president and CEO of the Philippine Daily Inquirer, told about her newspaper's mobile-centric publishing strategy that capitaizes on the fact that Filipinos are among the most prolific phone texters in the world.

The newspaper has 55 million daily readers. Gupta described a print strategy that focused on building relationships with readers, with respecting the competition, with starting afresh with each new edition and not assuming what works in one place will work in another. Every market is unique and calls for a different approach.

"Dainik Jagran's content is changed to reflect the colloquial tastes of every local market," he said.

Mobile advertising represents only 1 percent of company revenues, but Prieto-Romualdez predicted this will change as soon as next year, thanks to two new technologies that are now being introduced.

One allows readers to use their mobile phone cameras to take a picture of an icon in the print newspaper and have instant access to video associated with the story. "It allows the paper to be more interactive and gives the reader wider engagement in the news," she said.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-02 13:02

If newspaper or magazine content online was no longer free, 80 percent of consumers say they would not pay for access, a new Forrester Research report has found.

The remaining respondents who were willing to pay are split on how to pay: 8 percent said they would prefer a subscription for all online content, and another 8 percent said they would like one subscription to cover print, online and mobile. Three percent, meanwhile, said they would prefer to pay per article.

Because not everyone can agree on whether - or how - to pay, it's clear that giving consumers a choice, from free content to different types of paid content, may be the way to go, suggests Forrester's Sarah Rotman Epps.

"There's no one delivery platform, and no one pricing model, that will satisfy all consumers," she writes.

Meanwhile, almost 50 percent of North American editors have said they doubt paid content is the only answer, the American Press Institute reported in September. The API urged publishers look to the five-point plan put forth earlier this year by the Newspaper Association of America. The five points involve "doctrines" respecting true value, fair use, fair share, digital development and consumer-centric practices.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-20 00:45

As of the end of 2007, China was the leading mobile market in the world, with more than 500 million subscribers. This figure was up from about 300 million in 2004, with a net addition of more than 50 million each year, according to IDATE.

The United States was the second largest mobile market, with more than 250 million subscribers at the end of 2007. The market was relatively mature as it reached nearly 200 million in 2004, and grew less than 25 million annually, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

India followed close behind, with more than 200 million. In 2004, there were only about 50 million subscribers. The numbers increased rapidly, with more than 50 million in 2006 and 2007.

Russia and Brazil were ranked in the fourth and fifth spots at the end of 2007, both marking significant increases from 2004, according to IDATE.

Japan, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom were also on the list, but were relatively saturated markets, with fewer additional increases each year compared with the developing markets.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-11-13 23:48

According to IDATE, there were more than 2.1 billion mobile customers globally in 2005, with 820 million from the Asia Pacific region, 691 million from Europe and 232 million and 224 million from Latin America and North America, respectively, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

In 2008, the total numbers climbed to more than 3.8 billion, with about 1.7 billion from the Asia Pacific, 938 million from Europe, 475 million from Africa and Middle East and 425 million from Latin America. North America's share dropped, to 294 million in 2008.

In terms of mobile penetration, the global average was 27.6 percent in 2005, and 46.5 percent in 2008. Europe led with 73 percent in 2005 and 106 percent in 2008. North America had a penetration of 68 percent in 2005 and 87 percent in 2008, while in Latin America, mobile reached 43 percent in 2005 and increased to 76 percent in 2008. In 2005, penetration was 23 percent and 19 percent in the Asia Pacific, and Africa and the Middle East, respectively, and both rose to about 45 percent in 2008, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-10-23 18:36

Two percent, or two hours per month, of all TV viewing in the United States happens outside traditional TV devices, Media Post reported.

According to a recent survey conducted by Horowitz Associates, 2 percent represents two hours out of the overall 130.2 hours American TV viewers watch in a month.

Of those who had a PC or laptop, 9 percent, or 13 hours out of 138.6 monthly TV-content consuming hours, is spent on a platform other than a TV set. Among those multichannel viewers who watch TV content on a handheld device, 8 percent, or 12 hours out of the 143.1 monthly hours, is viewed on a platform other than a TV set.

The most popular Web destinations to view videos included YouTube.com, ABC.com. Hulu.com and NBC.com. Those types of programs people watched most on alternative video platforms are scripted dramas (24 percent); news programming (14 percent); comedy shows (13 percent); sports (13 percent); and sitcoms (11 percent).

Thirty-six percent of respondents said they wish all their favorite shows were available online, while another 30 percent wish all TV programmes were available on handheld devices, according to Horowitz.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-10-08 00:33

Global mobile subscribers will almost triple from 2004 to 2012, according to Portio Research, from 1.7 billion to 4.9 billion. The Asia Pacific region represents the vast majority of mobile subscribers, with about 40 percent of the subscribers in 2004, and more than half estimated for 2012 - a surge in growth from 702 million to 2.6 billion subscriptions, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

Northern and Western Europe represented the next largest segment of subscribers, expected to grow from 358 million in 2004 to 470 million in 2012, while North America represented 199 million in 2004 and is projected to reach 353 million in 2012.

Meanwhile, subscriptions in Central and Eastern Europe are expected to grow from 199 million in 2004 to 450 million in 2012, while Latin American subscribers will surge from 176 million to 470 million in the same time period.

While subscribers were comparatively small for Africa and the Middle East in 2004, the subscriptions are expected to skyrocket to 444 million in 2012 for Africa and to 162 million in the Middle East, largely leapfrogging Internet growth.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-10-06 19:16

The telecom market worldwide was worth US$1.18 trillion in 2006, and surged to $1.25 trillion in 2007, with more than half coming from mobile services, and more than 30 percent from developing countries, according to IDATE.

Numbers of fixed lines totalled 1.25 billion in 2006 and climbed to 1.26 billion in 2007, reaching 20 percent of the global population, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

The number of mobile subscribers grew from 2.67 billion worldwide in 2006 to 3.18 billion in 2007, with penetration of more than 50 percent of the total population.

Broadband subscribers, meanwhile, grew from 279 million to 348 million. However, the penetration was still low, at 5.5 percent in 2007, according to IDATE.

Numbers of fixed lines globally totalled 1.13 billion in 2003, with an approximate 50-50 split from industrialised and developing countries.

The numbers were up to 1.26 billion in 2007, in which growth was seen in developing countries, but the numbers declined in industrialised nations, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-09-25 22:21

According to a new report from eMarketer, end users are adopting mobile technology faster than advertisers, but the gap is expected to become smaller over the next four years, ClickZ reported.

However, in 2009, mobile advertising spending will reach $416 million, representing only 2.2 percent of total online display ad spending, according to the report, "Mobile Advertising and Marketing: Change Is in the Air."

According to the report's author, Noah Elkin, advertisers are eager to explore mobile to reach consumers, but "have been hampered by the diversity of the hardware, the complexity of the platform, and the lack of advertising options on less-sophisticated devices," ClickZ reported.

Besides, only few marketers have so-called "mobile budgets" today, the report pointed out. "For all intents and purposes, there's no such thing as a mobile budget. Rather, mobile remains at most a line item in the digital portion of most budgets, if it is there at all," Eric Bader, president of mobile marketing agency Brand in Hand, said to eMarketer.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-09-24 19:38

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