WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Mon - 01.09.2014


Murdoch

It’s official: Penguin and Random House are betrothed, their parent companies Pearson and Bertelsmann announced today.

As is often the case with arranged marriages, it is hoped that this union will allow the two houses to consolidate their power: together, the book publishers are expected to control over one quarter of the U.S. and British markets, and to generate approximately £2.5 billion (or $4 billion) in annual revenue.

And as with so many weddings these days, theirs is “subject to regulatory approval;” if all goes well, they will likely tie the knot in the latter half of 2013.

The idea of huddling together was no doubt influenced by the increasing need for publishers to puff out their chests against retailing giant Amazon, which has cornered 90 percent of the UK ebook market, and nearly 40 percent of the market for all books, according to Quartz.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-29 19:24

A long-form piece for the weekend: Tim de Lisle of Intelligent Life follows the "triumphs and tribulations" of the Guardian, and talks to its piano-playing Editor-in-Chief, Alan Rusbridger, in an attempt to answer its provocative headline: Can the Guardian Survive?

“Yesterday’s News Corp split announcement could spell big changes at The Times as Rupert Murdoch vowed losses would not be tolerated at any of the company’s print titles,” begins an article by Andrew Pugh on PressGazette. Murdoch reportedly said yesterday that he plans to be more "bullish" in the US than in the UK, and that “each newspaper will be expected to pay its way.”

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-29 16:12

The Sun has announced that it will be launching a new Sunday edition this weekend.

"The Sun's future can now be reshaped as a unique seven-day proposition in both print and digital," stated Sun editor Dominic Mohan in an article discussing the launch. "Our readers' reaction to the announcement of a seventh-day Sun has been huge and we won't let them down."

The news comes as the paper is still recovering from the arrest on February 11 of five senior Sun journalists, who were later released without charge. The arrests provoked conflict at the Sun, as staff objected to the way the Management and Standards Committee - an independent body set up by News Corp to investigate allegations of illegal activities at News International - handed over large amounts of evidence to the police without consulting journalists.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-20 15:40

"New research from Experian Hitwise suggests that 54,000 people a month are accessing content behind the paywall of The Times", Press Gazette reported.The article refers to research commissioned by Guardian News and Media, which was published internally by the company yesterday.

The GNM memo says, as Press Gazette reported, that they "estimate that a total of about 54,000 people globally are accessing content behind the paywall on the Times [and Sunday Times] website each month. Of the 54,000, approximately 28,000 are specifically paying for digital content. The remainder are print subscribers who get free access to the site as part of their newspaper subscription package."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-08 18:59

Rupert Murdoch's Australian newspapers will start charging for online content next year, News Corp. News Digital Media CEO Richard Freudenstein announced today, The Guardian revealed.

In an interview with ABC News radio, Freudenstein said The Australian, Daily Telegraph and the Herald-Sun were unlikely to follow The Times of London paywall model. "I think we're quite attracted to the Wall Street Journal model where you get the benefit of still getting a lot of your advertising revenue combining it with the ability to market yourself to a whole range of people and then upselling them into the paid part of the site," he said.

Freudenstein said The Wall Street Journal's approach "was very successful" as it allow readers to get some content for free. According to paidContent.org, The Times website charges £1 a day or £2 a week and it's only free for those with a print subscription, whereas the "WSJ.com is priced at $1.99 weekly but billed as $103.48 and includes some articles free to visitors from search listings."

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-19 23:57

Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation shelved this week its ambitious Alesia Project, a paid-for news content aggregation platform that promised publishers to generate new digital revenue streams, Poynter.org informed today.

"It is believed that News Corp's decision not to take the product to market is related to concerns over running costs," explained Campaign magazine, which estimated in £20 million ($31.5 million) the investment made in this venture. The digital newsstand was going to be launch in the next few weeks and at least £1 million had been already allocated to advertise it.

Although no official explanation has been provided, a source said to Reuters that the company "was unable to reach a 'critical mass' of publishers to support the plan."

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-22 23:36

The Financial Times is calling on UK Business Secretary Vince Cable to open an investigation of the possible takeover of satellite broadcaster BSkyB by News Corporation, saying it is "unlikely to encounter insuperable obstacles as the deal may well not fall foul of European competition law."

News Corp already owns a 39.1 percent minority stake in BSkyB, the Pearson Group-owned FT points out, and adds that Cable should investigate to "ensure the existence of a range of media voices," as together, News Corp and BSkyB "would be a truly formidable beast," with 37 percent of UK national newspaper circulation coming from a News Corp-owned publication, while Sky has 35 percent of the TV market, based on revenue.

"But access to Sky's substantial cash flows (rather than a taxed dividend, as at present) would give Mr Murdoch substantial firepower to cross-subsidise his loss-making UK newspapers, enabling them to compete with rivals more on price. Price wars are an established stratagem for News. In the 1990s, it grew the circulation of the Times through savage price cuts," the article states. "The UK newspaper industry as a whole is struggling, as it is in many parts of the world. Were Mr Murdoch to embark on fresh price wars, more rival papers would be marginalised - or even forced from the news stands."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-21 00:05

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