Date

Fri - 18.04.2014


New York Times

Digital subscribers are accounting for an ever-more-generous slice of American newspapers’ circulation pumpkin this Halloween, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulation (ABC)’s latest biannual study of 613 daily newspapers and 528 Sunday titles.

Overall, daily circulation has remained flat in the six months ending September 30, dropping by a mere 0.2 percent compared to the same period last year. But behind this placid mask, digital circulation— encompassing paid and restricted-access websites, mobile apps, PDF replicas and e-reader editions— rose as a proportion of total circulation by over 5 percent. It now accounts for an average of 15.3 percent of newspapers’ total circulation, up from 9.8 percent a year ago.

Leading the digital pack is The New York Times, with a circulation of over 896,000 across its digital platforms (with the data measurement caveat that one user accessing NYT content from multiple digital platforms may be counted more than once). Over half of subscriptions to The Times are now for digital editions.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-31 18:30

The New York Times Company’s share price experienced its furthest one-day drop in three years today after the company released third quarter results that showed an 85 percent decline in net income on the period a year earlier.

While analysts had predicted an average third quarter profit of 8 cents a share, the company reported a loss from continuing operations (excluding severance and other costs) of 1 cent a share.

During the quarterly earnings call today, Twitter users noted under the $NYT symbol that the company’s share price had fallen by 11, 13, and then 17 percent. (The decline stood at 14.6 percent at time of publication. View current price here).

On the call, Chairman and Interim CEO Arthur Sulzberger Jr. listed video, mobile and international expansion among growth areas for the company, and spoke of its engagement with Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Google +, its new presence on Flipboard, and its experimental HTML 5 app for the iPad as crucial elements in its strategy.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-25 18:54

Back when WAN-IFRA was still FIEJ (the Fédération Internationale des Editeurs de Journaux et Publications), the organisation’s 1962 News Bulletin carried an article that showed that the vast majority of British newspapers relied on advertising, not reader-generated revenue, to cover production and distribution costs. "Quality" newspapers garnered 73 percent of their income from advertising, as opposed to sales and circulation revenue at weekly titles. It is a trend that dates from well before the 1960s and continues to the present day, in both the UK and the United States.

At least, it was a trend that continued until very recently. Now there are growing signs that the tide is at last turning. This week, the New York Times co., publisher of The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune and The Boston Globe released second quarter figures showing that its titles’ circulation-generated revenue was higher than advertising revenue. Although dwindling income from print and digital advertising (which shrank by 6.6 percent and stands at $220 million) undoubtedly contributed to the shift, the Times’ famous paywall and an increase in price for print subscriptions saw circulation revenue at the NYT company’s news titles rise by 8.3 percent, to $233 million.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-27 17:49

The news that The New York Times will soon be publishing its entire content on Flipboard seems to signal a decisive change in the way in which traditional press and media companies engage with their audiences. From this Thursday, the entire content of the NYT will be available to subscribers, whilst non-subscribers will be able to read a limited amount of articles found in the paper’s Top News section.

The partnership with Flipboard is quite a departure from the Times's previous stance on its digital content. In the past it was necessary to have a subscription to see more than 10 NYT articles, and its digital version could only be viewed via the paper’s apps and website or by reading excerpts quoted by third parties. Explaining why a company that had previously guarded its digital content so jealously has made such a bold move, Denise F. Warren, general manager of The New York Times’s website points out that in a survey of the paper’s subscribers 20 percent of those asked used third-party aggregation apps like Flipboard. The deal still leaves the paywall system in place, but leading figures at the paper hope that allowing partial access to certain articles will encourage many who have not subscribed already to do so.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-26 18:27

In the digital age it makes sense for English-language news brands to focus on expanding their global audience: English as an international language is growing, print audiences in Europe and North American are declining, and digital technology makes is relatively cheap to publish in a foreign market (at least compared to the cost of printing costly international editions). All good reasons to try to grow your international readership.

As Nieman Lab pointed out in an article published earlier this week, The New York Times is a brand that is already “an established worldwide player.” However, the article suggests that the paper is still “trying to figure out its place in the international mediascape.” One small part of this process is the paper’s new India Ink blog.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-08 18:58

The New York Times: purveyor of “All The News That’s Fit To Print.” And now, all the news that’s fit to stream too?

A Nieman Lab reports, The Times has struck a licensing agreement with Hulu, making some of its video content available through the popular online streaming service. For the moment, the only Times video that is on offer with Hulu is a documentary about hockey named “Punched Out: The Life and Death of an N.H.L. Enforcer,” but Nieman Lab writes that more content is due to be uploaded soon.  

Author of the article Justin Ellis suggests that putting content on Hulu has both pros and cons for the Times. “On Hulu, a viewer may be more likely to seek a lean-back entertainment and watch a video longer than five minutes,” writes Ellis, “But by putting the videos on Hulu, the Times is also sending eyeballs off their property and adding an intermediary who’ll expect a cut of the ad revenue.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-04 17:07

Are things looking good for The New York Times?

Peter Kafka writes for All Things D that, according to Barclays analyst Kannan Venkateshwar, the Times’ circulation growth may start balancing out its advertising losses by the middle of 2014.

Venkateshwar’s prediction suggests that the Times’ paywall, which boasts 450,000 subscribers, is starting to pay off. More than that, it may be seen as a vindication of the Times’ digital strategy, which drew criticism after the paper posted a year-on-year decline in digital advertising revenue last month.

When the drop was announced, paidContent noted that, even though Times’ subscription revenue increased by 9.7% from the previous year, the results were “worrisome for a news industry staking its future on digital revenue.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-15 17:42

Why would a company pay a newspaper for advertising, when it can broadcast directly to its audience online? The question has long been perplexing newspaper companies, who are seeing their revenues drop as a consequence of brands cutting them out of the advertising process and going straight to Twitter or Facebook to reach their customers.  

But instead of fighting the shift, the New York Times Company launched a new advertising initiative yesterday, which aims to benefit from the fact that brands are becoming their own publishers. Ricochet, as the Times’s product is called, hopes to generate revenue by allowing brands to select specific New York Times content that is relevant to their customers, and then to share links to a version of that content surrounded by their own advertising.

“In the traditional advertising model, brands reach audiences through content; by contrast, using Ricochet, content reaches audiences through brands," explains the vice president of research and development at the Times, Michael Zimbalist, quoted in the official press release.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-27 15:37

Just over a year after The New York Times’ digital subscription model was launched, it provides the company with “incredible” audience data, the company’s chairman and CEO Arthur Sulzberger says at WAN-IFRA’s Digital Media Europe conference in London.

A total of 454,000 people have subscribed (not including print subscribers), and Sulzberger says much of the scepticism that abounded when the plan was first announced has since subsided. Given the number of media executives who have visited the paper’s offices over the last year, he expects many more payment models for digital content to be unveiled before long.

As well as the obvious financial benefit, Sulzberger noted that a key advantage of the subscription model is what it tells the paper about its audience’s reading habits.

For more on this story, please see our sister publication www.editorsweblog.org

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-04-16 17:59

The New York Times announced in a press release today that it has teamed up with Chinese publisher Shanghai Zhenwen Advertising Co., Ltd. to launch a monthly science magazine. Science Times China, as the magazine is called, is written in Chinese and sold in Beijing, Shanghai, Hong Kong and other large Chinese cities.

The press release suggests that the bulk of the magazine will consist of articles already published by the Times in English. Material will be take from the weekly science section of the Times, as well as from other relevant sections published by the Times newspaper and by nytimes.com. However, the Times will also incorporate some local Chinese content, while still retaining full editorial control over the new publication.

Michael Greenspon, general manager of The New York Times News Services Division, is quoted in the release: "New York Times readers in all corners of the world value the news, analysis and information that our journalists offer," he states. Greenspon adds that, "with the launch of Science Times China, we welcome a new group of like-minded readers to our loyal audience who are curious about seeing the world through the lens of science and technology."

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-22 18:48

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