WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Tue - 02.09.2014


News Corp.

It’s official: Penguin and Random House are betrothed, their parent companies Pearson and Bertelsmann announced today.

As is often the case with arranged marriages, it is hoped that this union will allow the two houses to consolidate their power: together, the book publishers are expected to control over one quarter of the U.S. and British markets, and to generate approximately £2.5 billion (or $4 billion) in annual revenue.

And as with so many weddings these days, theirs is “subject to regulatory approval;” if all goes well, they will likely tie the knot in the latter half of 2013.

The idea of huddling together was no doubt influenced by the increasing need for publishers to puff out their chests against retailing giant Amazon, which has cornered 90 percent of the UK ebook market, and nearly 40 percent of the market for all books, according to Quartz.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-29 19:24

The Daily, Rupert Murdoch’s first attempt at producing a digital-only newspaper, has announced that almost a third of its present employees are to be “released.” Rumours of its imminent demise have dogged the title since it was reportedly placed ‘on watch’ in July.

Of the 170 members of staff employed at The Daily, 50 will lose their jobs. The Sports and Opinion sections, which suffered from light traffic levels, will be particularly hit by the cuts as executives aim to reduce expenditure in underperforming departments. A memo sent to employees by Editor-in-Chief Jesse Angelo explained: “Sports reporting will now be provided by content partners, like Fox Sports […] The Daily will no longer have a standalone Opinion section. Opinion pieces and editorials will appear in the news pages, clearly marked, from time to time as appropriate.” Further efficiency measures include “locking the app in portrait mode,” meaning that digital pages will only be available in vertical layout, with no horizontal formatting option.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-01 15:10

Apple and News Corp may be ready to launch The Daily on December 9, according to John Gruber, of Daring Fireball. Apple may also announce subscriptions through iTunes, enabling consumers to receive automatically delivered newspapers and magazines directly to their iPads.

Rupert Murdoch's first tablet-only publication will be launched exclusively as an app for the iPad, and appear later on Android tablets. Its budget is believed to be US$30 million, with a staff of about 100.

Currently, iPad users download and pay for digital issues of a publication one issue at a time, Digital Trends pointed out.

"In addition to this being moderately inconvenient, it also keeps consumer information out of publishers' hands. Which is why, up to this point, publishers haven't warmed to the idea of rolling subscriptions through the App Store. Apple's refusal to share subscriber data limits publishers' ability to target their audiences for advertising and marketing purposes."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-26 18:28

Rupert Murdoch's News Corp bought on Monday 90 percent of Wireless Generation, a U.S. company that develops mobile and Internet educational software for teachers, Bloomberg revealed. The media group paid US$360 million in cash for the acquisition.

"We see a $500bn sector in the U.S. alone that is waiting desperately to be transformed by big breakthroughs that extend the reach of great teaching," said Murdoch, The Telegraph quoted.

According to the Financial Times, the deal will allow News Corp compete other media groups that have invested in software and education services like Pearson, which owns the FT Group.

This is the first time in almost 20 years that News Corp, which owns The Wall Street Journal and The New York Post, will "foray into the for-profit world of education since its book publishing arm, Harper Collins, got out of the textbook business in the mid-1990s," The New York Times reminded.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-25 17:48

Rupert Murdoch's tablet-only news publication, to be called The Daily, will be launched exclusively as an app for the iPad, and appear later on Android tablets, reports last week revealed. Since then, we've learned that The Daily's budget is believed to be US$30 million, with a staff of about 100, according to a report today by PC World.

A round-up of other information on the project is after the jump.

- The Daily will be published on the tablet seven days a week, and is expected to cost 99 cents a week, or US$4.25 a month.

- It will be headquartered in News Corp.'s New York offices and will cover the United States only, with no plans for foreign bureaux or a Washingon, D.C. bureau.

- Readership is expected to be between 100,000 to 500,000 over the first five years.

- A beta version is expected to launch by the end of the year, and a full launch is expected early in 2011.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-22 19:29

Last week, just hours after News Limited announced it would launch iPad apps for two of its Australian tabloids, James Murdoch, CEO of News Corp. in Europe and Asia and son of News Ltd's owner Rupert Murdoch, said sales of newspaper apps were cannibalizing the print version of the dailies.

But before apps as we know them even existed, it was once thought that free websites cannibalized print newspapers. At the time, Rupert Murdoch was one of the loudest voices against free online content. Today he is putting complete paywalls around News Corp.'s UK sites, TheTimes.co.uk and SundayTimes.co.uk.

Image: Huffington Post
But last week, when James Murdoch voiced his opinions on apps, he also said free websites might not really cannibalize print after all.

"The problem with the apps is they're much more directly cannibalistic of the core print product than the website," he said at the Monaco Media Forum, according to our sister publication, editorsweblog.org. "People interact with it much more like they do with the traditional product."

Reuters Blogs' Felix Salmon opined Friday that James Murdoch is likely only half right:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-15 23:57

Figures on readership behind the Times and Sunday Times digital paywalls have finally been released. 105,000 people have made some digital purchase, and about half of these are monthly subscribers to one of the digital editions: the websites or the Times iPad app or Kindle edition. "Many of the rest" said the press release "are either single copy or pay-as-you-go customers."

100,000 more print subscribers have activated their digital accounts either to the websites and/or iPad apps and the press release therefore concludes that the total paid digital audience is "close to 200,000." James Murdoch, News Corp's chairman and CEO for Europe and Asia said that this means that the "total paid circulation of The Times has grown."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-02 17:14

UK-based publishers Telegraph Media Group, Guardian Media Group and Trinity Mirror have put aside their differences in and partnered to petition Business Secretary Vince Cable, asking him to prevent Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. from embarking on a full takeover of satellite broadcaster BSkyB, MediaGuardian reported Monday.

The £8 billion takeover will grant Murdoch with a combined turnover of £7.5 billion. In addition to the newspaper firms, the petition letter was signed by BBC Director General Mark Thomson and Channel 4 Chief Executive David Abraham.

"If the two (News Corp and Sky) were combined, there might be a significant loss of plurality in our media market. (Vince) Cable, the relevant minister, will decide whether he wants to refer this. It's not that they've done anything wrong. It's just that there is a potential of an abuse of power," Thomson said, The Australian reported.

The acquisition will be filed for regulatory approval through the European Commission on the basis that it will function competitively. Once the EC is notified, Cable will have 10 days to make a decision and pass it through the country's current Prime Minister David Cameron.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-10-12 17:02

UK supermarket chain Asda and News International, the British arm of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp., have announced a new deal that features the return of NI-owned The Sunday Times to 260 Asda stores, following a week-long disappearance, MediaWeek reported today.

NI recently increased the cover price of the weekend title by £0.20 to £2.20. Last week, the publisher decided that it would have £0.183 of the price increase while retailers just a little over 1 pence or £ 0.017, which constitutes 23.5 percent. Asda responded by claiming that it should have £0.5, or 25 percent of the cover price, as it previously did.

Asda pointed out that NI made an "acceptable proposal." However an NI official said that the publisher "sold to all retailers at the same price," MediaWeek informed. If thedeal did in fact go through, Asda's competitors such as Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons might be suffering defeat, Media Week suggested.

NI owns The Times, The Sunday Times, The Sun and News of The World. According to the Guardian, the collective circulation of the titles amounts to 37 percent of the country's newspaper circulation. In 2009, The Times and The Sunday Times saw losses of nearly £87.7 million.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-28 01:16

The Financial Times is calling on UK Business Secretary Vince Cable to open an investigation of the possible takeover of satellite broadcaster BSkyB by News Corporation, saying it is "unlikely to encounter insuperable obstacles as the deal may well not fall foul of European competition law."

News Corp already owns a 39.1 percent minority stake in BSkyB, the Pearson Group-owned FT points out, and adds that Cable should investigate to "ensure the existence of a range of media voices," as together, News Corp and BSkyB "would be a truly formidable beast," with 37 percent of UK national newspaper circulation coming from a News Corp-owned publication, while Sky has 35 percent of the TV market, based on revenue.

"But access to Sky's substantial cash flows (rather than a taxed dividend, as at present) would give Mr Murdoch substantial firepower to cross-subsidise his loss-making UK newspapers, enabling them to compete with rivals more on price. Price wars are an established stratagem for News. In the 1990s, it grew the circulation of the Times through savage price cuts," the article states. "The UK newspaper industry as a whole is struggling, as it is in many parts of the world. Were Mr Murdoch to embark on fresh price wars, more rival papers would be marginalised - or even forced from the news stands."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-21 00:05

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