Date

Sat - 25.11.2017


Newspaper Association of America

The American Press Institute is ceasing independent operations today after 66 years as a centre for journalism training and career development, reports the Washington Post.

In a move first announced in January, the API is merging with the Newspaper Association of America Foundation, a tax-exempt unit of America’s largest trade organisation for the newspaper industry.

The interim executive director of API Carol Ann Riordan reassures readers on API’s website that, as the two groups merge, “training, leadership development and best practices will be key activities of the new organization.”

As part of the move, API’s iconic building is being sold and its eight full-time staff and one part-time employee have been laid off, writes The Washington Post.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-23 18:36

Newspapers attracted almost two-thirds of all adult Internet users in the United States to their websites in September, according to a study conducted by comScore for the Newspaper Association of America, Editor & Publisher revealed today.

Users visited 4.1 billion pages and spend more than 3.3 billion minutes navigating the newspaper sites, which reached 55 percent of American between 25 and 34 years old. Interestingly, 73 percent of those in households earning more than $100,000 a year read digital dailies, E&P reported.

"This data from comScore reinforces how newspaper publishers are leveraging original, high-quality content to build a powerful and engaged audience in the digital space," NAA President and CEO John F. Sturm stated in a press release.

The analysis also pointed out that visits to newspaper websites were at least 10 percent higher that the ones received by Yahoo! News, CNN and MSNBC during the past month.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-14 22:26

U.S. newspaper advertising revenue dropped 5.6 percent in the second quarter, but the decline rate has slowed down, according to the latest figures published by the Newspaper Association of America.

Overall spending in the second quarter was down from $6.82 billion to $6.44 billion year-over-year. Print ad revenue declined 7.6 percent to $5.6 billion, while online spending was up 14 percent to $743.9 million, and now represents 12 percent of total newspaper ad revenues, Media Buyer Planner reported.

Newspaper ad revenue has declined for 16 quarters in a row, but the 5.6 percent drop in the second quarter was an improvement - compared to 9.7 percent decrease in the first quarter and 23.7 percent decline in the fourth quarter of 2009, according to the AFP article posted on Google News.

"Despite a highly competitive environment, online advertising growth rebounded back into double digits, while declines in traditional revenue categories continue to moderate as the general advertising recovery progresses," said John Sturm, chief executive officer of the NAA, in a statement.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-09-08 22:51

In the second quarter, The Newspaper Association of America spent US$290,000 lobbying the federal government on issues such as the future of media, privacy and legislation aimed at making government information public, according to The Associated Press article posted on Business Week.

The amount was up from $250,000 in the previous quarter, as well as $278,000 in the same quarter of 2009, according to a Congressional disclosure form.

Photo: Media Bistro

The Newspaper Association of America represents about 2,000 newspapers in the country. It lobbied the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives on a proposed measure called the Free Flow of Information Act, which would protect reporters in some cases from "having to obey court orders to reveal confidential sources, a protection that media organisations argue would encourage more whistle blowers to come forward," The AP reported.

The group also lobbied on the Federal Communications Commission's Future of Media Project, which would influence federal policy on media ownership.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-08-17 21:25

U.S. newspaper companies drew record traffic to their Web sites in the first quarter - on average 74.4 million monthly unique visitors, which represents more than one-third of all online users, according to the latest figures provided by Nielsen Online for the Newspaper Association of America, Editor and Publisher reported.

The numbers were up from 72 million unique visitors per month during the previous quarter. The data also showed online newspaper visitors contributed more than 3.2 billion page views, or more than 2.3 billion minutes browsing, in the first quarter of 2010, according to the AFP article posted on Google News.

"As the economic outlook begins to improve, our industry will continue to shape its own future with digital products and services that grow audience and offer maximum value to advertisers," according to NAA President and CEO John F. Sturm.

"Newspaper publishers continue to experiment with aggressive new business models, leveraging trustworthy and robust content to attract large audiences to their digital properties month after month," Sturm added in a statement.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-04-23 23:00

Newspaper Web sites in the United States received an average monthly unique audience of 72 million visitors during the fourth quarter of last year, which represents 37 percent of all Internet users, reported WebProNews today. The data was obtained through Nielsen Online research that the Newspaper Association of America (NAA) published.

Newspaper Web sites stopped attracting new users, according to Editor & Publisher. According to the Nielsen figures, the number of unique users dropped from 73.2 million to 72.3 between November and October 2009, and plunged to 70.3 million in December.

The average time spent per person in October was 34 minutes and 14 seconds, whereas during November it was 32 minutes and 44 seconds and during December it was 34 minutes and 52 seconds. "These strong and consistent audience figures come as newspaper publishers continue to transition their companies into multiplatform content providers to meet the needs of today's audience. As the economy begins to stabilize, newspaper companies are in position to leverage their trusted brands to reach a highly engaged audience and deliver maximum value to advertisers," said NAA President John F. Sturm, according to MediaBistro.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-02-03 18:44

Google has proposed a system of micropayments to access news content that it hopes to put in place during the next year, The New York Times reported Thursday.

The proposal was part of a submission to the Newspaper Association of America, which had made a request from a number of technology companies for paid content models.
The micropayment system, posted by Nieman Journalism Online, will act as extension of the online payment system, Google Checkout, launched in 2006 to compete with eBay's PayPal system.

"While currently in the early planning stages, micropayments will be a payment vehicle available to both Google and non-Google properties within the next year," Google stated. "The idea is to allow viable payments of a penny to several dollars by aggregating purchases across merchants and over time."

The document said the Checkout application would be available for newspapers to charge for subscriptions but at this stage is "fairly rudimentary."

The search engine giant said paid content revenue could also allow Google to rely less on advertising revenue.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-10 19:38

According to a recent study by the Newspaper Association of America and Nielsen Online, newspaper websites attract more than one third of all Internet users, Biz Report wrote on Thursday.

The study revealed more than 70 million visitors to U.S. newspaper sites during June 2009, a number which makes up nearly 36 percent of the entire U.S. online community.

The report also showed that advertising on online papers is more effective with visitors to the newspaper Websites more engaged in the ads and more likely to act on the advertising. According to the study 82 percent of adults who viewed an advertisement on a newspaper Website "took action" because of that ad. These "actions" include clipping coupons, making purchases or visiting the product's website.

"The newspaper audience continues to expand as publishers aggressively capitalize on their investments in digital properties, adding robust features and launching new products to attract a highly valuable consumer audience," said NAA President and CEO John F. Sturm. "Advertisers who want to reach consumers ready to make purchasing decisions continue to use the trusted newspaper brand to ensure their messages are heard through the crowd."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-03 08:25

U.S. newspaper publishers marked a 29 percent decline of their print and online advertising revenue in the second quarter, which is steeper than the previous period, according to the data from Newspaper Association of America, Bloomberg reported.

Ad revenue was down from $9.6 billion in the first quarter last year to $6.82 billion year-over-year, while ad sales fell 28 percent in the first quarter to $6.62 billion.

This continuous downturn in advertising has resulted in job, wage and section cuts, as well as newsstand price rises.

Those with more than half revenues coming from ad sales include New York Times Co. and Gannett Co., according to Newspaper Association of America.

Industrywide, print ad revenue declined 30 percent to $6.16 billion, while online-only advertising decreased 16 percent to $653.1 million in the second quarter, Bloomberg reported.

Recruitment ad sales plunged 66 percent, the most across all classified categories. Real estate ads followed with the 46 percent drop and automotive ads with 43 percent.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-08-28 14:49

The top two U.S. movie theatre chains, Regal Entertainment Group and AMC Entertainment Inc., have begun to cut the listings on newspapers, showing the movie schedules at local theatres, according to Huffington Post.

In most cases, theatres need to pay newspapers to print that information. They are now, in order to cut costs, directing consumers to their Web sites or third-party sites, such as Fandango, Moviefone or Flixster. These third-party sites charge no fees for posting listings, but make money from the advance-sold movie tickets. Many of them also feature film critics and movie trailers.

U.S. online traffic to AMC's Web site was up 21 percent in July compared with one year ago, and that to Regal's site increased 18 percent, according to comScore. This effort may result in some more traction.

Although the newspaper revenue generated from print movie listing is not tracked by The Newspaper Association of America, the amount is believed to be relatively small. However, every dollar matters in the tough situation newspapers companies face, as many have to cut staff, reduce the frequency of print editions, or even shut down the operation.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-08-25 18:06

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