WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Tue - 02.09.2014


online ad revenue

Traditional Newspaper management is just like the old guard in Baseball. That's what you'll think after watching Moneyball starring Brad Pitt as Oakland A's general manager; Billy Beane.

Based on a true story, Moneyball shows Beane going up against his old school, know-it-all, front office. He's tired of being in last place and squeaking by on a shoe string budget. Unable to afford star players, Billy decides to slaughter a few sacred cows and installs experimental yet logical tactics into his game plan.

Continue reading on Mel Taylor Media

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-06 10:19

What if newspaper executives thought like Yahoo! and Google? Kirk MacDonald, executive vice president of The Denver Post, thinks it could make a big difference in the way a newspaper executes its digital offerings. "Think like a digital company would. Look very closely at what Yahoo!, MSN, and ReachLocal are doing and become followers," he said.

Continue reading on Editor & Publisher

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-06-08 18:33

Columbia University has surveyed the state of digital journalism, and it has concluded that journalists must rethink their relationships -- and their audiences' relationships -- with advertisers.

That does not mean yielding editorial control to sponsors, but it might mean coming up with alternatives to impression-based pricing, creating higher-value content for the Web by tapping into page view data, and helping to ensure that Web ads have value on their own.

Continue reading in The New York Times

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-11 12:26

As people spend more and more time online, money spent on Internet advertising also continues to rise, the latest data from the Interactive Advertising Bureau and PricewaterhouseCoopers shows, The Associated Press reported last week. In the first six months of this year, marketers in the United States spent a record amount on Web ads - US$12.1 billion - an 11.3 perccent increase over the amount spent in the first half of 2009, paidContent reported yesterday.

The biggest percentage of the spending goes to search advertising, which was up 11.6 percent to $5.7 billion in the first half of the year, or 47 percent of all online ad spend, according to the AP article, posted by BusinessWeek. Revenues for the second quarter this year are expected to show recovery from last year, reaching $6.19 billion, according to the report.

Image: IAB Internet Advertising Revenue Report: An Industry Survey Conducted by PwC and Sponsored by the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) Display ads were at more than $4.4 billion, a 16 percent increase from the same time last year, the Kansas City Star reported. Another sector seeing big strong growth was digital video, up 31 percent.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-22 23:35

HTML 5, the latest version of code used to create websites, is expected to further erode users' privacy, by letting sites know where users are physically located, as well as better track browsing histories. Consumer activists and privacy advocates are certain to be against these privacy threats, but those in the journalism world may find it to be their "salvation," writes The New York Times's Robert Wright.

"The willingness of advertisers to spend the money that sustains journalists has always depended on having information about the reader," he stated. And, as online players get bigger, the power they wield increases as they obtain more user data. Wright points to Google, Yahoo and Facebook as the top examples of firms obtaining more and more user information.

Image: WSJ. Click here for the interactive version.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-20 19:00

Although U.S. newspapers are widely read online, reaching more than a third of Web users, their' overall share of the Internet ad market is being eroded by the endless amount of competition from online-only news outlets. This trend is expect to continue; however, newspapers should move quickly now to maximise their audience reach before the numbers continue to worsen, Nat Ives explained in an article for AdAge today, interpreting the latest data from PricewaterhouseCoopers.

And despite newspapers' huge reach online, their share of digital ad revenue in the United States has dropped from 16.2 percent in 2005, to 11.4 percent in 2009. By 2014, that number is expected to drop to 7.9 percent, according to PwC data. Meanwhile, overall digital advertising in 2014 will be 56.6 percent larger than it was in 2007.

So what can newspapers do to maximise themselves online, even while their share of the online advertising pie continues to shrink? Ives offers some advice:

1. Stand out. As firms like Yahoo add to staffers to their original news and blogs, newspapers are cutting reporters, "thinning the distinction between their products and those of their rivals. Advertisers also seem to see a diminishing difference. The gap between newspapers' high ad rates online and other news sites' prices is apparently shrinking."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-28 20:25

Ad revenue at U.S. newspapers was down 10 percent to US$6 billion in the first quarter, from $6.6 billion in the same period in 2009, according to the data released by the Newspaper Association of America.

It was the smallest drop since late 2007, according to the Associated Press article posted on USA Today.

Compared to $11.1 billion ad revenue in the first quarter four years ago, the newspaper industry is now 46 percent loss, the AP reported.

Although still in decline, the trend in the first quarter indicated that the misery should not last much longer - the year-over-year declines in ad revenue have eased in the last three quarters.

NAA also shows U.S. newspapers reported their first gain in online ad sales, up 4.9 percent to $730.4 million, while print advertising plunged 11 percent to $5.25 billion, according to the Bloomberg article posted on Business Week.

Internet ad sales had been a sweet spot for newspapers, which grew 30 percent or more since 2004.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-28 00:35

Google will no longer target ads on a query-by-query basis, and will instead use hours of search history to target ads to users when they use search keywords, the search giant announced in a blog post Wednesday. This means Google will store each query in order to display targeted ads related to that keyword hours later, on the search page or a site that uses Google ads.

"We've recently started to expand the use of the query words in referral URLs to a few hours so we can so we can continue to deliver more relevant ads," the blog post stated. "After a short period of time (a few hours) the query words are no longer used for the purposes of matching ads. Of course, users can continue to opt out of our advertising cookie at any time here."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-13 01:19

McClatchy Co. will not put up paywalls, and is instead "comfortable" with an ad-supported online model, CEO Gary Pruitt announced today, MediaPost reported.

However, the U.S. newspaper publisher will continue experimenting, offering paid content relating to state government news (which will target wealthy lobbyists) at its newspaper in Raleigh, North Carolina, for example.

"If you can hold on to your audience, you can be leading local media provider in your market, even with the proliferation and fragmentation of the entire media landscape," Pruitt said at Borrell Associates' Local Online Advertising Conference, according to paidContent. "The percent of internet-only ad dollars will grow because of self-serve vehicles and classifieds. We don't need it to be 50/50 for us to have the same cash flow. Digital has a higher profit margin because of the lower costs from not having to print and distribute it compared to print."

McClatchy's newspapers include the Kansas City Star and the Miami Herald.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-10 00:30

While most media formats in Russia experienced decreased advertising revenue in 2009 compared to last year, online outlets saw a rise in theirs, according to data from the Russian Association of Communication Agencies (AKAR), Gipp.ru reported today. Experts also predict online ad expenditure will continue to grow throughout 2010.

In Russia, print newspapers and magazines saw a drop of 44 percent during the first three fiscal quarters of the year. Daily papers suffered the least, having had a 20 percent decline in ad spend since 2008. Meanwhile, specialised publications underwent a 55 percent decrease. TV ad expenditure plunged by 21 percent from RUB 94.5 (US$3.15) billion to RUB 74.5 (US$2.48) billion from 2009 to 2008, according to Gazeta.ru. Other spheres went through significant loses; for example, expenditure within exterior advertising decreased by 42 percent since the same period last year.

Russian Internet platforms saw a 3 percent growth in ad spend. Market research from KOMKON during November 2009 showed that Internet advertising was gaining popularity amongst advertisers, according to Alexander Belyakov, manager at contextual advertising company Begun. Over half of those interviewed (56 percent) said that they work at companies that disseminate ads across the Web, a 21 percent rise since 2008.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2009-12-29 15:20

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