Date

Thu - 17.04.2014


Online content

Only two percent of readers in the UK would be willing to pay for a website that it is currently free and 79 percent would go elsewhere, according to KPMG's Media and Entertainment Barometer study, Press Gazette reported yesterday.

The research, based on three YouGov surveys, also showed that nine percent of those who are not currently subscribe to a website would be willing to do so in the next year, paidContent.org informed.

"Whilst the appetite to pay for web content is moving slowly, the pace of spending money to download content on mobile devices is moving much more quickly, particularly in the crucial 18-34 demographic," David Elms, head of Media Sector for KPMG, explained on a press release.

Only 13 percent said they have paid for content online and it mostly includes music (23 percent) and online gaming (21 percent), Journalism.co.uk pointed out. Media--newspapers, news analysis, magazines and TV--represent 19 percent.

Furthermore, the study found that 86 percent of British "preferred to consume media offline rather than online. The most popular reason was a preference to reading physical copies," paidContent.org reported.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-12-07 17:01

Continuing its expansion foray into new verticals, The Huffington Post announced plans to launch a new section dedicated to the topic of divorce, MediaBistro.com reported yesterday. The new section will go live on November 2.

The new section will be headed by journalist and author Nora Ephron, who conceived the idea and will now serve as a founding editor along with Willow Bay as the senior editor. The niche section will target a large number of people, as approximately half of all U.S. marriages ends in divorce, the article stated.

"If you want to know about planning a wedding or things like that, there are so many places for people to go, but there isn't one go-to place around divorce," Arianna Huffington told MediaBistro.

The launch of this new vertical is set to coincide with the release of Ephron's new book, "I Remember Nothing" which has a chapter focusing on divorce set to release on November 9, according to another post on MediaBistro.com.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-10-06 17:00

Rue89, the French pro-am news website launched its first monthly print edition, Rue89 Le Mensuel, last week, that translates as Rue89 the monthly, Journalism.co.uk reported.

While the decision to go from online to print was an editorial and commercial one, according to founder Pierre Haski, this move aims to "replicate in print the spirit of the website: serendipity and an eclectic choice of stories written both by journalists and non-journalists, accompanied with selected comments from our web audience."

The former online-only title will now be available on print as a 100-page, micro format magazine costing €3.90 per issue and €34 for an annual subscription. The magazine will select 10 percent of its online published content that deserve another reading experience and give stories a second life, while creating a new revenue stream from sales and advertising on print.

Having launched in 2007 by a former team of Liberation journalists, this news site secured €1.1 million investment from five new investors in 2008 before closing the news operations of its sister site in Quebec. The launch of this magazine has been self-funded, according to Haski. He said, "The investment is actually quite minimal as content is produced by our team (20 full-time staff and some freelance writers). We're counting first on the website and our community to promote it. There's no massive and costly promotion campaign."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-06-21 23:24

Following the revamp of Reuters' U.S. Web site in December last year with a cleaner, more advertiser friendly look, the news wire is set to restructure its free, open UK news site along similar lines, paidContent reported.

Reuters.co.uk is significantly dependent on advertising revenue, unlike many of its services that target business professionals with premium pricing. The redesigned advertiser friendly UK site plans to launch this week, and it is likely certain content elements will become paid, MediaWeek reported.

Having revamped its commercial operations over the last six to seven months and making some significant hirings during the period, "We started to organise the site around topics. By topics, you can create topics of advertiser interest - whether broad topics like foreign currency exchanges or narrow topics around the small business environment," Tim Faircliff, consumer media general manager of Thomson Reuters, told paidContent.

While maintaining current free news offerings and without ruling out the future possibilities of a paid model, Faircliff explained Reuters is "moving in to the ad-supported model with a nod to the fact that paid is part of the DNA of our organisation," according to paidContent. "We think it's sensible that you can pay for niche, high-value content."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-20 20:14

The financial crisis that spurred the media crisis has left journalists, publishers, bloggers, and other media professionals on an unrelenting quest to find the a business model that meets the demands of both the digital and print worlds. As this quest continues, Peter Kirwan, writing for The Guardian's Media Blog, suggests that, at least in the digital realm, Financial Times' Web site FT.com has found the answer.

Kirwan examines what the Financial Times did over the past few years to turn itself around from a failing publication in 2002 to one of the only publications to make a profit last year while the rest of the media world seemed to fall apart. This leads the author to wonder if "the FT has unlocked the secret of eternal profitability."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-06 20:26

The Boston Globe is working to keep its place as a portal into Boston with its launch of a new feature in the opinion section of its Web site, "The Angle: Stories Worth Talking About." The section gives readers an opportunity to get deeper insights on regional and national issues and encourages their participation in discussions on the news, Editor & Publisher reported.

"By bringing together articles with a strong discussion point from all areas of our reporting, The Angle will help our online readers to become more engaged in the issues and subjects of high interest to them and the community at large," Peter Canellos, editorial page editor of The Boston Globe, stated in a press release.

The Angle feature will highlight one particularly interesting story per day, while providing readers with a complete selection of current articles from the Globe's coverage that include local, national, international, business, arts and entertainment news and more, the press release stated.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-02 23:47

Will consumers pay for online news and entertainment contents that are now free? According to a recent Nielsen survey which covered more than 27,000 consumers across 52 countries, 85 percent said they would like free content remain free, the latest SFN's report, New Revenue Models for Newspaper Companies, reported.

The survey was conducted during the autumn of 2009, covering nations in five geographical regions, including the Asia Pacific region, Europe, Middle East/Africa/Pakistan (MEAP), Latin America and North America.

When asked if free online content should remain free, the majority (85 percent) of all the respondents said they strongly agree or agree, while only a small group expressed their disagreement, according to the Nielsen report "Changing Models: A Global Perspective on Paying for Content Online," released in February 2010.

To break down by region, Latin Americans had the highest percentage of respondents saying they "agree" or "strongly agree," with more than nine out of 10 saying so.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-03-24 23:08

The surge in social media has benefited journalists globally by offering them a world of information at their fingertips with powerful social networking tools and news aggregator sites. But this opportunity comes along with some risks as well. To lessen these risks, Reuters has added social media guidelines and principles to its handbook, Dean Wright, global editor for ethics, innovation and news standards at Reuters, announced yesterday in the Reuters Blog.

While Reuters embraces social media as a powerful informative tool and encourages its usage among journalists, they must ask permission from managers to use social media in conjunction with their professional lives, MediaGuardian reported.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-12 00:33

Will consumers pay for online news and entertainment contents that are now free?

According to a recent Nielsen survey which covered more than 27,000 consumers across 52 countries, 85 percent said they would like free content remain free. However, when asked based on specific types of content, survey participants are more likely to at least consider paying for particular categories, especially if they have ever done so, the research company said in a blog post.

Will Pay / Won't Pay

Online content for which consumers are most willing to pay, or have already paid, are those which are usually paid-for offline, such as movies, music, games and current television shows. They always cost a lot to produce.

Consumers are least likely to pay for what is "essentially homegrown online," which is produced at fairly low cost, including social communities, podcasts, consumer-generated videos and blogs.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-02-17 00:02

Building a great system takes time, which is why The New York Times isn't in a hurry to launch its metered paywall this year, President and CEO Janet Robinson said in an earnings call today, paidContent reported.

The new system will "keep us connected to search driven Web" by being flexible between paid and free content, she said.

In the mobile arena, The Times' free iPhone app reached 3 million downloads since it was launched in July 2008, according to MocoNews. In December, it had 75 million mobile pageviews, Robinson said.

It also has paid apps. Its iPhone Crossword app which has a tiered pricing structure: 30 day subscription for US$1.99, six months for $9.99 or a yearly subscription for $16.99. The newspaper's BlackBerry Sudoku app and Crossword app both cost $2.99.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-11 01:25

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