WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Sat - 25.10.2014


online news content

Australian publishing giant Fairfax Media showed much-improved financial performance for the year ending June 30, with annual net profits of AU$282 million after incurring a $380 million loss last year, caused due to declines in advertising revenues. Fairfax will also begin charging for content online and across emerging mobile platforms, to survive in the competitive newspaper industry, Agence France-Presse reported today.

Fairfax's online payment strategy will centre around a two-tier model, wherein users will be required to pay for accessing premium content, while generic content will continue to remain free, Sydney Morning Herald reported. The general news on websites of The Melbourne Age and Sydney Morning Herald will remain free, while "premium niche content" such as that on The Australian Financial Review's website will be charged.

The media group aims to pursue "greater sharing of editorial content and collaborating across print, online and mobile, more integrated selling and monetising our content online and on emerging platforms," Fairfax said in a statement to the Australian Stock Exchange, according to AFP.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-08-27 23:55

Six French newspapers have come together to create an online newsstand where readers will be able to buy and read their content. The initiative, which will be launched in September, was announced yesterday by France's National Daily Press Union as an alternative to Google News, El Paí­s reported.

However, in an e-mailed statement to SFN from Google's French office, Myriam Boublil, head of communications and public affairs, pointed out that Google does not currently advertise on its French version of Google News. Boublil stated that the company's position is that it welcomes "new attempts to find technologies and business models that will help journalism flourish online. We value quality journalism, which is why we work with news partners around the world to help them attract bigger audiences and generate revenue. That's what Google News is all about, and we're happy to see any new experimentation and innovation in this space."

The content's price on the virtual newsstand will be fixed by each daily and several subscription packages to either individual articles or an entire publication will be offered. "The monetization of the web contents, which has been agreed on by the editorial groups, is the main priority," according to Les Echos.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-07-22 20:40

Yahoo News has launched a daily 90-second Web series featuring the most-clicked stories of the day on the basis of its popularity, in association with Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. and production house Reveille, MediaWeek reported yesterday.

The launch of the series, called "Who Knew?," follows the recent hiring of journalists and reporters from prestigious media agencies to the Yahoo news development team for creation of original content. The Web series is produced in collaboration with Reveille, and is being produced by the Elisabeth Murdoch-owned TV production house that also recently produced a show for Yahoo Shine as a part of the "content production and distribution agreement," paidContent reported.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-13 23:30

Valérie-Anne Bleyen and Leo Van Hove at Vrije Universiteit Brussel conducted a study of 87 newspaper Web sites in nine Western European countries in 2006, 2008 and 2009, the latest SFN's report, New Revenue Models for Newspaper Companies, reported.

The study categorised the sites into the following groups: free, fee light and fee+. "Fee light" refers to newspaper sites where all the news, columns and archived articles (if available) are free, and where the PDF version is the only paid-for content on the site. "Fee+" on the other hand, refers to sites that offer something other than a PDF against payment.

According to the study, the share of the free news sites across the nine countries increased from 19.5 percent in 2006 to 25.6 percent in 2008. However, in 2009 the growth of free sites seemed to slow, as it only increased slightly to 26.8 percent.

Luxembourg, Spain, Belgium and France are the countries with the biggest growth of free sites. In Luxembourg, the amount of free sites jumped from 33.3 in 2006 and 2008 to 66.7 in 2009. In Spain, the figures boosted from nothing in 2006 to 37.5 percent in 2009.

In Belgium, they grew from 11.1 percent in 2006 to 22.2 percent in 2008. In France, the numbers went up from 9.1 percent in 2006 to 18.2 percent in 2008.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-04-07 23:31

As paywalls go up across the web, most notably those implemented by the Times and Sunday Times last week, one comes tumbling down, reports Press Gazette. Johnston Press, a UK regional publisher with over 300 titles across the country, ended its paywall experiment this week.

In November of 2009, Johnston Press implemented various paid content strategies on four of its English titles and two Scottish titles. Some websites offered "teaser" content that suggested the reader buy the paper version to finish the article, others required user registration, and a few titles erected a paywall, allowing readers 3 months of paid content for £5. Johnston Press' annual report, published earlier this month, gave an optimistic outlook on the ability of JP papers to implement a paywall successfully.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-01 22:49

In an effort to increase the popularity of its news site through original content, Yahoo has recruited many journalists from print and online media agencies and opened a bureau in Washington, The New York Times reported yesterday.

The move will bring together original news articles and videos created by its team of journalists on politics and media, and those licensed from the media sources on its news site.

The journalists joining the news division of Yahoo include prominent reporters and editors like Michael Calderone from Politico, Jane Sasseen, a former BusinessWeek Washington bureau chief, and Anna Robertson, an Emmy-winning news producer from ABC's "Good Morning America," along with other journalists hired from publications like the New York Observer, Washington Post, Talking Points Memo and several others, The Times reported.

A similar effort to boost its sports coverage was implemented by the search engine about three years ago, when it hired sports journalists to create original sport content and the acquisition of Rivals.com, a network of sports blogs, according to The Times. However, the original content push initiative came only as a succession to the failure of its expensive ambitious project on original television-style programming.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-01 01:38

Aggregators such a Google are often accused of making life more than a little difficult for newspapers - yet the company has spoken out once again, offering advice for newspapers struggling against the ubiquity of online news:

In an article by Mercedes Bunz from The Guardian's Digital Content Blog, Google stated that the "key" to newspaper's survival online is "engagement". The statement, issued by Google's Hal Varian, places emphasis on the importance of offering readers interactive experiences but provided little information on specific steps publications should take to go about doing this.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-10 23:22

Google is open sourcing its news experiment Living Stories, the online news format the search giant announced in December. The opening up is a "next step towards better relations with news publishers," Media Guardian's Mercedes Bunz wrote Wednesday.

Living Stories was developed with the Washington Post and The New York Times. The format shows a summary of recent developments relating to the topic, together with a timeline on a single page.

Until now, Google has only had a part in journalism through sending traffic to news sites. "With Living Stories, Google tries to play a further part in transforming journalism into the digital era," according to Bunz.

On average, users spend nine minutes on each story, and most of them prefer the Living Stories format to traditional online news articles, a Google spokesman said, according to paidContent.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-19 16:20

Russian publishing house Kommersant has announced the launch of a blog section, Lenta.ru reported today. The blog is still working in trial mode, but already has three full-time bloggers: Oleg Kashin, Andrei Kolesnikov and Olga Allenova.

Kolesnikov and Allenova are currently in Ukraine, offering coverage on electoral campaigns. Other Kommersant journalists have blogs but that they haven't started publishing yet. According to Chief Editor Pavel Chernikov, the outlet would be adding blogs dedicated to culture, international politics and others.

The publisher's online portal Kommersant.ru has Web sites for daily paper Kommersant as well as its numerous magazines that are focused on the economy, business issues, entertainment and other content.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-02-03 20:16

According to a report by business research firm Gartner, sales of mobile phone applications are predicted to raise more than US$6 billion in 2010, CMSWire wrote Tuesday. By 2013, the figure is expected to reach US$29 billion. This year, an estimated 4,500 applications may be downloaded, compared to 2,500 in 2009.

UK newspaper The Guardian announced that it sold 68,979 copies of its premium iPhone application that it launched in December. Each one costs around US$3.99, which amounts to about US$275,000 so far. The outlet can earn up to US$3.2 million per year, according to CMSWire.

Even though a number of newspapers are starting to charge for online content, an Adweek Media/Harris poll revealed that the model "seems unlikely to work" since 77 percent of adults said they would refuse to pay for a news site's content. One out of five adults said they would pay between US$1 and US$10 per month while only 5 percent said they would pay more than US$10 per month, according to the study.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-01-22 17:16

Syndicate content

© 2014 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation