Date

Mon - 21.04.2014


Online trends

Parade magazine is now selling ads on the Web sites of its partner newspapers as an alternative method of revenue making, MediaWeek reported.

Parade is an insert on weekend editions of newspapers across the United States. Having started distributing celebrity and game content to the carrier paper sites a year ago, this strategic initiative by the magazine to sell on its papers' Web sites is aimed at effectively transforming the Sunday newspaper supplement into an online ad network.

The new online ad partnership means that local papers can now get national ads, which wouldn't otherwise be available through ad networks or on their own, and the magazine gets a cut of the revenue for effective sale.

"As we push this content out, there's a cost for us, and as our digital footprint grows, we wanted to take advantage of that," Parade publisher Brett Wilson told MediaWeek.

Wilson said the new set-up is a "syndicated network - in the positive sense of the word," as Parade magazine customises ads around the branded content it syndicates. Relying on external sources for editorial content, the Parade's content strategy spans as a trend across print media.

Parade's sales strategy so far appears to be appealing to retailers and packaged goods providers looking to drive purchasing power, Ildi Pap Conrad, U.S. director of print investment, OMD, told MediaWeek.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-07 23:13

The Seattle Post-Intelligencer closed its print version and went online-only a year ago yesterday, The Associated Press reported. Readership is stable, and the journalistic work of Seattlepi.com is a success, but the issue of financial stability is "a work in progress," industry analyst Ken Doctor of Outsell Inc. told the AP.

The Hearst-owned news organisation is on its way to turning a profit, Hearst Seattle Media general manager Pat Balles told MediaBuyerPlanner, but would not give a timeframe for profitability. About four million people visit the Web site each month, about the same as were visiting the site before the print version closed, Seattlepi.com's executive producer Michelle Nicolosi told the AP. The site receives 40 million pageviews monthly, according to Poynter.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-19 19:20

Online media revenue in the Middle East and North Africa is expected to spike to US$600 million by 2015, from less than $100 million last year, research from global consulting firm Booz and Company shows, The National reported today. Mobile revenues are also increasing, expected to reach $2.7 billion.

According to the report, 70 percent of audiences in MENA countries said they spend two hours or more on the Internet each day, while 36 percent said they spend two or more hours watching TV.

"This tells us where our listeners are going to be, and where we need to start making significant headway. This doesn't mean traditional media will take a back seat, it just means new media will be as important," Karim Sabbagh, vice president of Booz and Company, told the audience of the Abu Dhabi Media Summit, according to Gulf News.

Also in the MENA region, broadband usage is expected to rise by 40 percent by the end of 2015, according to the report.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-10 02:06

Newspapers have always been the go-to destinations for most in-depth local coverage, but with the digital revolution many fell behind in organising that hyperlocal content online. Other sources have picked up the slack, and today hyperlocal content is more valuable than ever before.

One new source is Outside.in, which is partnering with publishers to better aggregate hyperlocal content through monitoring news, blogs, Web discussions, maps and more, and to also serve targeted advertising to readers, MediaBuyerPlanner reported Tuesday. Publishers include Dow Jones Media Group, the New York Post, The Miami Herald, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and properties of the Tribune Company.

Outside.in has mapped to more than 50,000 neighborhoods in the United States, and then paired those areas accordingly with targeted advertising.

Partnering with a site like Outside.in helps publishers aggregate and categorise local news and information effectively, while also creating tailored local news sites. It also facilitates tagging news maps, social-media functions like reader comments and sharing via e-mail, and helps advertisers deliver audience-specific advertising at relatively modest prices, Media Post reported.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-12 00:31

Like most content creators, the Telegraph Media Group has always focused on increasing Web traffic by directing a maximum number of users to its Web site, Telegraph.co.uk, thereby increasing digital revenues through advertising. But times are changing, online ad revenue isn't enough, and TMG has come up with a new plan.

TMG's digital editor, Edward Roussel, told MediaGuardian today that the publisher will stop chasing everyone and instead focus on the "three Cs": content, commerce and clubs, with the hope of building a more sustainable business model.

"Rather than focusing relentlessly on the aggregated numbers of unique users and page impressions, we are now looking more at channels," he told MediaGuardian's Mercedes Bunz. "Increasing the traffic in those channels, we equally drive up revenues there as well. We want to drive those areas harder to make them commercially attractive." He added that publishers can do more with clubs in which people pay for memberships.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-03 21:26

Forty-four percent of people using Google News said they only scan the headlines and don't actually go on to the news sites themselves, according to a survey of online U.S. news consumers by research firm Outsell, paidContent reported today. And the more a user checks the news on Google News - "power news users," or those who checks more than twice daily - the less likely they are to click on a news link.

This study is expected to "provide further ammunition" to content creators who charge aggregators with not sharing ad revenue they make on providing links to news articles, Agence France-Presse noted.

Google points out that its News service sends billions of clicks to news sites each month. A spokesman told paidContent that the online search giant only shows "enough for users to identify the stories they're interested in - a headline, a short snippet and a link to the publisher's site - and we direct users to those news sites to read the stories."

Ken Doctor, an analyst for Outsell, said in a statement that although Google is driving traffic to newspapers, "it's also taking a significant share away."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-20 02:16

Facebook was the most visited Web site in the United States this Christmas, the first time the social networking site as ever been the most visited U.S. site, Hitwise reported yesterday. The percentage of new visits to the site last week on Christmas Day and Christmas Eve also increased 10 percent, which could have played a part in the traffic increase, the firm reported.

This was also the first time Facebook beat Google in traffic in the United States, according to paidContent. In the United Kingdom, Google maintained its top position as the most-visited Web site on Christmas Day, Telegraph.co.uk reported.

Last year, when Facebook had 140 million users, it also saw a spike in traffic on Christmas. This year users are up to 350 million, AllThingsD reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-31 00:15

Two U.S. newspaper publishers in the Dow Jones Local Media Group will begin charging for online content in January, paidContent reported yesterday. The San Joaquin Media Group and SouthCoast Media Group will roll out at least partial paywalls.

Registered members to SouthCoast sites will be able to view 10 free articles and videos each month, while unregistered users will be able to view three free items a month. San Joaquin Media Group publishes Recordnet.com, which reported that some content, such as blogs, weather, classified advertising, calendars, puzzles and national and international news, will remain free for all visitors, as well as three visits per month for local news content.

The rate for an all-access subscription to Recordnet.com will be US$2.67 per week for new subscribers. For current print subscribers, unlimited online access will cost an additional 77 cents per week.

"Recordnet.com has established its value with readers and advertisers in the communities it serves," said Roger Coover, president of San Joaquin Media Group and publisher of the Record, according to the Web site. "This shift asks readers to recognize that value irrespective of whether they read the newspaper in print or online."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-22 20:23

Communications accounted for 22 percent of the total time spent online worldwide, beating other online activity categories in March 2008, according to comScore's study, Digital World - State of the Internet.

Social connections made up 16 percent, which did not even exist in 2005. Entertainment and leisure contributed 14 percent, while shopping and travel, and work, business and education represented less than 10 percent each, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

According to EIAA, the average time spent online per week in Europe increased from 11.3 hours in 2006 to 12 hours in 2008, up 6 percent.

In 2008, the United Kingdom led in time spent online per week among the countries surveyed, with 13.5 hours, up 19 percent from 2006's 11.3 hours. Italy also gained more than average, from 2006's 12.1 hours to 2008's 13.4 hours.

According to the Nielsen Company, in January 2009, the United States topped other countries surveyed in terms of average monthly online-related time per person, with a little more than 30 hours.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-12-11 20:21

Japan boasts two new newspaper Web sites, both of which deliver the news in a highly-stylised artistic form known worldwide as manga, Asiajin yesterday reported.

Manga no Shimbun, or Manga Newspaper in English, is a general interest daily launched by KaBA Net on October 15, 2009. In pictorial headlines of such high quality they put to shame the ads beside them, the newspaper instantly and economically communicates the subject of a story to readers - and nonreaders - of any language.

The newspaper's press release (also in manga) promises translations to English, French and Korean as the publication grows.

Meanwhile, Trend Pro launched Nihon IT Manga Shimbun, or Japan IT Manga Newspaper, Thursday. Though this publication's chief focus is - as its title implies - on technology news, currently dead tabs labelled "Economics" and "Politics" suggest that coverage of those areas may be forthcoming.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-18 20:05

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