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Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Fri - 19.09.2014


Paid Content

Hearing that niche sites are the future of online news is nothing new. “Write to people’s passion, and they will gobble up just about anything,” was one of the survival tips that news site designer Stijn Debrouwere gave to publishers in a recent blog post about the state of modern journalism. “MacRumors and many other niche sites do this,” he observed.

However, an article published by paidContent yesterday suggested that, while they might be popular, many of these niche sites have trouble actually making money. “We noticed digital publishers, especially in Europe, were struggling to build digital businesses,” former Brightcove vice president Rags Gupta told paidContent.

To address this problem, former executives from DoubleClick, Demand Media and BrightCove have created a start-up named RollUp Media, and which aims to help niche online publishers monetize their content, says the article.

“Niche sites may have websites, blogs and a Twitter presence but they don’t know much about SEO and monetisation,” states Gupta. He tells paidContent, “We have built a platform that covers all aspects of content: creation, distribution and monetisation.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-11 12:30

According to a report released by analytics company Distimo, the top 100 best-selling apps in Apple’s Newsstand for iPad garner about $70,000 per day, minonline.com reported

Newsstand, which organizes subscription-based apps for digital newspapers and magazines into a virtual newsstand on the iPad, launched six months ago and accounts for over 7% of the 200 top-selling apps in the app store, minonline said. Games still account for 50% of all top-selling apps, the report said.

Distimo app rankingsDistimo app rankings

The top five best-selling Newsstand apps in February were The Daily, NY Times for iPad, The New Yorker, National Geographic and Cosmopolitan, the article said.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-29 14:43

The Chicago Tribune has announced that it will be offering subscribers a new Sunday books section as a piece of premium paid content.

Printers Row, as the section will be called, will cost Tribune subscribers an additional $99 a year. Those who sign up will get a 24-page book supplement every Sunday, featuring reviews, interviews with authors and news from Chicago's literary scene as well as a free book of short stories each week.

The Chicago Tribune describes the launch in its own business section as "a means to bolster revenue beyond the traditional subscription and advertising model" by offering readers with niche interests a high-quality targeted product that they will be willing to pay for. Gerould Kern, senior vice president and editor of the Chicago Tribune states that "audiences want very specialized information, and we are going to give them that".

The Tribune compares its model to cable TV subscriptions, which encourage users to sign up to a basic package and then pay for extra premium channels.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-24 19:07

by Andrew Keen

It's Stream time again. Last year, when I interviewed Sir Martin Sorrell, the co-founder and CEO of WPP at the company's annual Stream unconference in Athens, Sir Martin argued that "free=fail." And this year, Sorrell, who presides over the world's largest advertising company, a global leviathan with 153,000 people working in 2,400 offices in 107 countries, was equally scathing in his attack on free online content.

Continue reading on TechCrunch

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-09-22 11:57

The New York Times is preparing to introduce multiple subscription packages for access to the paper's website and other digital content, kicking off the biggest test to date of consumers' willingness to pay for news they're accustomed to getting free. Under the new system, expected to be rolled out next month, the Times will sell an Internet-only subscription for unlimited access to the Times site, as well as a broader digital package that bundles the Times online with its application on the iPad, according to a person familiar with the matter. Subscribers to the print edition of the paper will get full online privileges at no additional cost, Times executives have said.

Continue reading on The Wall Street Journal (free)

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-01-26 18:50

"New research from Experian Hitwise suggests that 54,000 people a month are accessing content behind the paywall of The Times", Press Gazette reported.The article refers to research commissioned by Guardian News and Media, which was published internally by the company yesterday.

The GNM memo says, as Press Gazette reported, that they "estimate that a total of about 54,000 people globally are accessing content behind the paywall on the Times [and Sunday Times] website each month. Of the 54,000, approximately 28,000 are specifically paying for digital content. The remainder are print subscribers who get free access to the site as part of their newspaper subscription package."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-08 18:59

Since raising its paywall in June, News International titles The Times and Sunday Times have seen the percentage of their UK users increase significantly. The percentage of people accessing the news site from within the United Kingdom has more than doubled, from less than 35 percent in February to 75 percent today, according to a report by MediaWeek.co.uk.

The paywall around the Times websites has also resulted in a more "affluent and more engaged digital audience," according to chief marketing officer Katie Vanneck, the report stated. Also, the frequency with which users are accessing News International's online content has risen, from an average of twice weekly, to an average of three times each week.

When comparing the sites to their competitors, UK audiences made up 36 percent of MailOnline's 46.9 million unique users in September, 34 percent for the Telegraph.co.uk, 42 percent for Guardian.co.uk and 43 percent for Independent.co.uk.

Vanneck said The Times and Sunday Times had more than 105,000 paid-for customers since June. By doing some basic math, even if we estimate that number today at 110,000 (with 75 percent being from within the UK), then 82,500 of those users are UK-based. Compare that to the MailOnline's 36 percent of 46.9 million uniques - reaching 16.884 million UK users. However, the number of returning users is likely much lower.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-11-11 15:49

Figures on readership behind the Times and Sunday Times digital paywalls have finally been released. 105,000 people have made some digital purchase, and about half of these are monthly subscribers to one of the digital editions: the websites or the Times iPad app or Kindle edition. "Many of the rest" said the press release "are either single copy or pay-as-you-go customers."

100,000 more print subscribers have activated their digital accounts either to the websites and/or iPad apps and the press release therefore concludes that the total paid digital audience is "close to 200,000." James Murdoch, News Corp's chairman and CEO for Europe and Asia said that this means that the "total paid circulation of The Times has grown."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-02 17:14

The Boston Globe might be on the verge of becoming one of a growing number of papers that ask readers to pay for online media. According to the Boston Business Journal, The Boston Globe may announce a plan by the end of the year to charge readers of online content in order to increase revenue.

"The Globe has paid apps out there. In regard to big picture, you're going to be seeing introduction of apps going in this quarter, in fact, in regard to Boston.com. But from a standpoint of evaluating what we plan on doing in regard to paid models, they are, that is under evaluation right now, in fact," said NYT Co. CEO Janet Robinson at a conference on Wednesday.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-24 16:17

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation will give Journalism Online's Press + e-commerce online platform to 10 non-profit journalism sites in order "to encourage you to seek permanent sources of financial support," the foundation told grantees, Editor & Publisher reported today.

The first 10 sites given grants from the foundation that install Press + will receive a year-long waiver of of the revenue Journalism Online collects for the platform, as well as payment and advisory services. Journalism Online was formed in 2009 by Steven Brill, Gordon Crovitz and Leo Hindery.

Image: Superchou's Flickr photostream

In an interview with Shaping the Future of the Newspaper last summer, Steven Brill said that as a lecturer of a journalism course at Yale University, he suddenly became conscious of the talented young people he was sending into a profession ready to implode "because a bunch of publishers made a crazy decision to give everything away for free."

Brill sighted two barriers facing the online payment model, the initial cost itself and the laborious process of exchanging payment information in order to access content.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-22 23:58

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