Date

Tue - 22.07.2014


Paid Content

The News of the World will install a paywall next month, the Guardian reported. The paper will charge online viewers £1 for a day's access and £1.99 for a four-week subscription. News of the World plans to launch a paid iPad app in the near future, which will charge a separate fee of £1.19 per week. "News International is leading the industry by delivering on its commitment to develop new ways of making the business of news an economically exciting proposition," says Rebekah Brooks, chief executive of News International.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-17 16:07

Andreas Wiele, director of the Bild Group, encouraged publishers not to be afraid of cannibalising their print products by creating a strong digital presence, and not to be afraid of charging for it. If you don't grab your readers online, he warned, someone else will. Wiele was speaking at the WAN-IFRA 9th International Newsroom Summit.

Bild, Germany's leading tabloid and Europe's biggest selling newspaper, has not seen any declines in readership in the last five years despite a thriving web presence. In fact, Wiele said, there is only a 7% overlap between the print and online audience. He explained that all stories are put online after the editorial close each night, except for very rare exclusives which are saved for the paper, "so there is really no reason to pick up the newspaper, but 3 million people still buy it every day."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-09 16:29

Chairman and publisher of The New York Times, Arthur Sulzberger Jr, stressed the need to take risks and not be afraid of failure in the quest to find a business model that can adequately support high quality journalism. He was speaking at the WAN-IFRA 9th International Newsroom Summit in London.

The New York Times is due to introduce a 'metered' paywall in early 2011. Readers will be allowed to access a certain number of articles free each month, then will be asked to pay. "This has the benefit of allowing our millions of readers who come to us through search engine to still find our content," Sulzberger specified, while those who use the site heavily will be charged.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-08 16:06

Australian publishing giant Fairfax Media showed much-improved financial performance for the year ending June 30, with annual net profits of AU$282 million after incurring a $380 million loss last year, caused due to declines in advertising revenues. Fairfax will also begin charging for content online and across emerging mobile platforms, to survive in the competitive newspaper industry, Agence France-Presse reported today.

Fairfax's online payment strategy will centre around a two-tier model, wherein users will be required to pay for accessing premium content, while generic content will continue to remain free, Sydney Morning Herald reported. The general news on websites of The Melbourne Age and Sydney Morning Herald will remain free, while "premium niche content" such as that on The Australian Financial Review's website will be charged.

The media group aims to pursue "greater sharing of editorial content and collaborating across print, online and mobile, more integrated selling and monetising our content online and on emerging platforms," Fairfax said in a statement to the Australian Stock Exchange, according to AFP.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-08-27 23:55

Zero percent of people said they would pay to use Twitter, according to a study by the Center for the Digital Future at the University of Southern California Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

Forty-nine percent of Internet users surveyed said they have used free online micro-blogging services such as Twitter, but when asked if they would pay to use Twitter, not one person said they would, according to the study, released Friday.

"Such an extreme finding that produced a zero response underscores the difficulty of getting Internet users to pay for anything that they already receive for free," stated Jeffrey I. Cole, director of the center at USC. "Twitter has no plans to charge its users, but this result illustrates, beyond any doubt, the tremendous problem of transforming free users into paying users ... Online providers face major challenges to get customers to pay for services they now receive for free."

The study also found that Internet users don't really care for online ads, either.

Seventy percent said online advertising is "annoying," and 50 percent of the users never click on Web ads. However, ads are the lesser of two evils, with 55 percent saying they would rather see online ads than pay for content.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-27 00:17

Following reports over the weekend that the Times had lost 66 percent of its online traffic since introducing compulsory registration and a paywall in recent weeks, MediaGuardian has now reported that the Times lost almost 90% of its online readership compared to February. This is the figure that was previously predicted by Sunday Times editor John Witherow, and is, according to the Guardian, "the standard experience when a site moves to a paid-access model instead of free access."

The Guardian's calculations are based on data from Experian Hitwise (as was the 66% figure) that shows how many people have attempted to access the site and how many people register to reach the home page. Taking into account figures provided by Dan Sabbagh, Beehive City blogger and former Times media correspondent, MediaGuardian concludes that the total number of daily visitors to the Times' site has fallen by about 84 percent since May.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-20 19:46

The Times Online and Sunday Times last week began charging for online content, and publishers around the world are eager to see if the UK newspapers' efforts are successful.

However, according to a new Forrester study, instead of asking how much they can make from the content, companies, should be focusing on "how that content can help create new revenue streams," analyst Nick Thomas wrote in his Forrester blog.

Image: Francesco Rachello

"The value in a media business lies in its dialogue with consumerism," Thomas wrote. "If a paywall removes 90% of your audience (as Sunday Times editor John Witherow has suggested -- and even that may be an underestimate), the challenge becomes even harder. Focusing on the sale of content is missing a trick: Media companies are not actually in the content business; they are in the audience business," he added.

The percentage of readers who will switch to the paywall model is not yet clear, but plenty of evidence shows that consumers spend money online on products and services. For example, online news fans tend to buy books, tickets, travel, or clothing online more than average online users.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-07-09 00:44

Newspapers everywhere are taking a good hard look at paid content, and how, or whether, paywalls can benefit them. Rupert Murdoch's The Times and Sunday Times are being watched today, as they begin charging for online content - the first non-specialist newspapers in Britain to do so.

As online ad prices and paid circulation go down, all while online readership soars, experts predict many newspapers will continue trying out different types of online paid content models. Other newspapers will certainly look to thetimes.co.uk and sundaytimes.co.uk for lessons. Both sites will charge £1 for a daily subscription, or £2 for a weekly subscription.

"We believe the new sites offer real value and we look forward to continuing to invest and innovate for readers," said Rebekah Brooks, CEO of News International, News Corp's British subsidiary, Agence France-Presse reported today.

The basics of an online paid content business model are based on both attracting enough paying customers and serving high-yielding advertisements to that very dedicated audience.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-03 01:18

Three U.S. newspapers are set to introduce paywalls to their websites later this week, reports journalism.co.uk. The newspapers, The Tallahassee Democrat in Florida, the Spectrum in Utah, and Greenville News in South Carolina, will introduce a range of subscription packages on July 1. Gannett owns all three of the newspapers and the paywalls are reportedly part of the company's subscription trials.

On the Greenville News site, publisher Steven R. Brandt and executive editor John S. Pittman explain "content, regardless of the platform, was never 'free.' This new model will require Web users to pay for online content, either by selecting one of the subscription offers above, or purchasing a day pass to the GreenvilleOnline.com website. The difference is that now everyone will be paying for it, not just those who bought the print edition."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-30 20:49

Bloomberg News is doing things a little differently. In stark contrast to media heavyweights such as the Wall Street Journal, The Times of London and The New York Times, Bloomberg has launched a fresh version of its business news website supported solely by ads rather than subscription fees.

A free-content approach to news provision would seem to be a departure from the company's traditional revenue model which revolves around selling subscriptions to its Bloomberg Terminals data feeds at the price of $1,500/month.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-22 23:07

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