Date

Sat - 23.09.2017


paid site

The Pearson-owned Financial Times will launch a subscription based news and analysis website covering the pension sector for trustees and pension managers in the United Kingdom, called schemeXpert.com, paidContent.co.uk reported yesterday.

The content on schemeXpert.com will be produced by a dedicated in-house editorial team with insights from leading consultants, lawyers, investment houses and research bodies, according to MNILive.com. Aggregated news and analysis will also be provided to subscribers.

This is the seventh niche paid news offering by the newspaper in its efforts to reduce "reliance on more cyclical advertising," a spokesperson for the newspaper told paidContent. The financial group has been making significant efforts to reduce dependency on advertising revenue, from 74 percent in 2000 to just 45 percent in 2009, by increasing subscriptions on its news site in the recent years.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-07 19:36

The founder of virtual marketplace eBay is stepping into the news business, aiming to launch a news site that will do what other news publishers are struggling with: getting people to pay for news, The Associated Press reported today.

Honolulu-based billionaire Pierre Omidyar will launch a news site called "Honolulu Civil Beat," which will be home to community news in Hawaii. Users will be required to pay to discuss issues, ideas and exchange information about matters affecting their communities. Civilbeat.com goes live today with an official launch scheduled for May 4, and plans to charge US$19.99 for monthly membership.
paidContent's Staci Kramer termed the site an "online civic square." Omidyar told her that the site will be a place where Hawiians can "learn about and better understand our home, the challenges we face, and debate and discover ideas and strategies for moving forward."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-21 19:31

The Russian edition of Forbes magazine has launched free access to its Web site, Lenta.ru reported yesterday. The online outlet contains sections such as "Main," "Economy" and "Your Business," which are further divided into sections.

In addition, the site contains video content, blogs, popular publication material, "the best" articles from the archives, links to other publications and a page on which to subscribe to the print edition, according to Lenta.ru. Visitors will be able to access any content from past editions, which have been published since 2004.

As planned, the Web site will only share half of the material with the print edition. The Web address was initially conceived as www.forbes.ru, but was finally launched as www.forbesrussia.ru.

Forbes is currently in the middle of a legal case with Landmark VIP Services, which adopted the former address as its own, Lenta.ru added. On another note, media mogul Rupert Murdoch previously expressed plans to charge for all News Corp. Web sites, the Guardian reported in August.

"Quality journalism is not cheap," said Murdoch. "The digital revolution has opened many new and inexpensive distribution channels but it has not made content free. We intend to charge for all our news Web sites."

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2009-11-10 17:39

Even as Rupert Murdoch today announced his more aggressive stance against online news aggregators, those on the other side of the aisle suggested that more, not less engagement with search engines might be a better solution.

Chris Silver Smith, director of optimisation strategies for KeyRelevance, today wrote that other than the biggest players in the dailies market, the newspapers he frequents to help with projects are usually not optimised for search engines. "It's hard to expressly invite a perceived enemy into your house on one hand while issuing invective against him on the other," he stated in his Search Engine Land column, using the example of newspapers' mixed feelings toward Google.

Smith points out that not long ago, newspapers perceived yellow page companies to be as much of a threat as they feel Google is today. Becoming more tech-savvy is the best tool, and currently newspapers have at their fingertips the possibilities of monetizing archives, as well as making on-site search better.

For search engines' spiders to better crawl, index, process and rank a page, Los Angeles Public Relations Firms recommends a few basics for Web sites looking to optimise:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-09 19:15

A new poll conducted by paidContent:UK and Harris Interactive showed most consumers are resistant to paying for online newspapers, the Guardian reported.

However, the study also found one possible hope for publishers: print and online may work in tandem. Only 5 percent of respondents who read a news site at least once a month would pay for online access. However, if a free or discounted printed paper subscription is provided, that number was up to a combined 48 percent.

Although the proportion of people who are not willing to pay still remains a majority, it's only a slight win - "it seems the printed edition could leverage online subscriptions; not just among existing readers of the paper, but also among those who don't already buy it," paidContent:UK reported.

This data shows most people think physical products should have tangible economic value, while digital content is expected to be cheaper.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-09-28 17:23

Schenectady, New York's Daily Gazette will once again charge for online content that has been offered for free since 2007, The Associated Press reported.

Beginning August 3, the electronic edition of the paper and other online content will be uniquely available to home delivery subscribers or those who pay a US$2.95 monthly subscription fee. Selected blogs and featured breaking news will be posted on a free site.

Judy Patrick, the Gazette's managing editor, said the decision was made due to disappointing online advertising revenue and expressed the paper's intention to keep the integrity of the paper's content as well as reward paying readers by once again charging to use the site.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-30 11:38

The DIY social network platform GROU.PS has received a second round of funding from Golden Horn Ventures, which invested US$1.1 million in the company last year and committed to giving the startup another $1 million this year, paidContent reported.

The company reportedly counts more than 100 million users that have created 40,000 online networking groups, putting them in a position to compete with other popular Do-it-yourself sites such as Ning and KickApps.

GROU.PS platform allows users to create photo albums, maps, calendars, amongst other options. Along with basic revenue generating methods such as the use of Google Adsense ads, users of GROU.PS are also able to charge membership fees to the groups they have created.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-26 15:27

The Sunday Times plans to launch its own online edition, which could eventually charge for content, Media Guardian reported Wednesday.

Until now, Sunday Times content has appeared online along with its daily counterpart, The Times, under the title TImes Online. Though the launch date is uncertain, the new site would be devoted to the Sunday Times content only.

Decisions regarding payment plans and what content would be charged for are also not finalised; however, subscribers to the paper will not have to pay for access to online content.

The somewhat expected plans to institute payment plans comes after Rupert Murdoch, chairman and chief of the paper's parent company News Corporation, announced the company was "planning to introduce a pay model across all our properties but we will test it first on some of our stronger properties," according to Media Guardian.

James Murdoch, chairman and chief executive of News Corporation in Europe and Asia, said he expects the online editions will take about two years to recuperate on losses from falling advertising revenue from print editions.

"There are lots of ways we can make money from content over and above the advertising market" Murdoch said, describing the online publishing model as "malfunctioning," Media Guardian reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-04 13:49

CircLabs, a venture between the Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute and several media entrepreneurs,is planning to propose new technology that claims to help news organizations in both obtaining loyal readers and introducing tiered payments, Paid Content reported.

A mixture of online content and social media, the technology will offer targeted advertising and news, all the while respecting user privacy with what CircLabs co-founder and principal Bill Densmore called "stringent protections".

The project, called "Circulate" is set to be launched next year. CircLabs says it is in talks with potentail partners, including the AP, but no official deals with news organizations have been announced as of yet.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-28 09:29

The Salt Lake Tribune will begin to charge for some online content, The Salt Lake Tribune reported. The decision comes after the Tribune's parent company, MediaNews Group, said putting its print content on the Web for free is "an injustice to paying subscribers and creates perceptions that printed news and information have no value."

In a memo sent to employees by MediaNews Group, the company explained it will be making a shift from putting all printed content online to offering "premium" online content that differs from the print edition.

MediaNews President Jody Lodovic, said the company's strategy is "about creating a different audience online (and)...about creating options for people getting their news in different ways."

There is no launch date or consumer cost projection for the plan as of yet, although it is speculated that "bundle" packages could be offered, such as a combined online and print package, involving reduced printing and home delivery schedules, The Tribune reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-15 10:22

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