WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Fri - 24.10.2014


paywall

MediaNews Group will begin charging for online content in May, adopting a metered paywall system similar to the one The New York Times announced it will put up, Bloomberg reported Friday. The U.S. newspaper publisher will use Journalism Online LLC to handle processing of payments for its Web sites.

The test will begin at the company's Enterprise-Record in Chico, California, and Daily Record in York, Pennsylvania. If it's successful, the paywall may be instituted at more than 50 dailies owned by MediaNews, including The Denver Post and San Jose Mercurcy News, the Denver Business Journal reported Saturday.

Image: Superchou's Flickr photostream
Paid subscribers of the Enterprise-Record and Daily Record will have complete access to the papers' online content, or could have to pay a small "up-charge," the amount of which has yet to be decided, MediaNews President Joseph Lodovic told Bloomberg.

The holding company for MediaNews Group filed for bankruptcy at the end of January. Affiliated Media Inc., the privately held parent company for the publisher, expects to emerge from bankruptcy in one or two months. It has said that it has a deal with creditors to reduce its $930 million debt to $165 million.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-08 23:16

Axel Springer has decided to add online paywalls on two of its German papers, the Berliner Morgenpost and the Hamburger Abendblatt, right after French newspaper Le Figaro and NYTimes.com, paidContent reported.

Monthly access to all content on morgenpost.de now costs €4.95 (£4.32/$6.79), while a premium monthly subscription to abendblatt.de is €7.95 (£6.93/$10.90).

It is free to acess national news on Abendblatt.de, but it costs extra for content specific to the Hamburg region. Subscriptions for both are renewed every month.

In December 2009, Axel Springer launched its paid-for iPhone apps for two of its other German titles, the tabloid BILD and DIE WELT. Christoph Keese, head of public affairs, also announced Axel Springer's intention to work with Google and other search engines to develop a direct payment system, which will charge for individual articles when people click on Google's search results.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-02-05 23:13

Newspaper publisher McClatchy is going to try out charging for content online, Editor and Publisher reports.

Chief Executive Gary Pruitt said that McClatchy will trial a pay model on one of its newspaper websites, suggesting that a number of articles could be available for free before the reader hits a paywall. He added that the publisher will continue to focus on free online content supported by advertising, and that he believes that this will remain widespread. "We feel the model isn't broken," he said. "But we'll learn from everything - we wish them all the luck. If someone cracks the code, we'll copy it."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-28 20:32

Nieman Lab's Johnathan Stray has created a paywall calculator, Paywall!, that aims to juggle the different factors that could go into building a paywall and find the best combination that could generate maximum revenue. He takes the New York Times' proposed payment model as a basis: a certain number of articles per month can be viewed free, and after that readers will be asked to subscribe.

"The key to paywall revenue projections is to understand how different portions of the audience are affected differently," says Stray, and his model breaks the audience into five groups based on their number of page views per month: fly-by, occasional, weekly, daily, loyal. Depending on how many articles are offered free, it is unlikely that a huge number of visitors will be affected by a paywall, Stray points out, but the ones that will be are the loyal readers.

For more on this article, visit our partner site, www.editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-27 22:47

Long Island, New York newspaper Newsday put its Web site behind a paywall at the end of October, and three months on, just 35 people have signed up for an online subscription, the New York Observer reported today.

However, print subscribers do get free access to the site, as does anyone who has Optimum Cable television, which is owned by Newsday's owner, the Dolan family and Cablevision. About 75 percent of Long Island's residents have either Optimum Cable or a subscription, which could point to why there are so few Web site-only subscribers.

Traffic to the Newsday site has also decreased by half, according to Nielsen figures, Crain's New York reported.

Publisher Terry Jimenez told the newsroom the number in a meeting last week when a reporter asked how many sign-ups the site had. Full access to the site costs US$5 a week, or $260 a year. The redesign and relaunch of the site cost $4 million, and so far the newspaper has made $9,000 from the 35 people.

Jimenez told staffers that the Web site was not meant to generate much revenue, but instead give loyal subscribers an extra benefit, according to the Observer.

If the Web site isn't making money, "why are we doing it?" one staffer asked at the meeting, according to Crain's.

Newsday's management is also in a dispute with the employees' union over a proposal to cut pay by 10 percent.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-27 00:46

Following in the footsteps of The New York Times, French news sites like L'Express and Le Figaro will be providing paid-for online content, Le Monde reported today. News magazine L'Express intends to propose a paywall in 2010, sometime in the second trimester. Online Director Corinne Denis said the publication is continuing to work on the project. However, their "model is not yet finalised" and is not profitable since its costs are higher than what subscriptions could bring.
Le Monde already provides certain pay-for features on its site. Meanwhile, Le Figaro mentioned that it was introducing a "premium" paywall option in January but put the plans on hold for a while. It may launch the feature in February, Le Monde added. Jeff Mignon, a French consultant in New York, pointed out that he did not believe that payable features would save the print press by compensating for advertising revenue loss, reported MaxiSciences. He added that, at the same time, we shouldn't judge publishers who take all sorts of initiatives to boost their profits.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-01-21 23:02

Much of the transformation in the newspaper industry is led by the big western players: The New York Times has announced it will charge for content, The Guardian has launched a paid news app for the iPhone, and the Apple tablet is eagerly anticipated.

But these changes affect other parts of the world, as the Egyptian newspaper Al-Ahram reminds us. "In Egypt, we are also experiencing a seismic media evolution," Tarek Attia writes, in a considered op-ed on the state of the newspaper industry in Egypt and the future of media.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-21 20:06

The New York Times will launch a metered paid model on its Web site at the beginning of next year, the newspaper announced today. Under the plan, users to access more than a set number of articles per month will be asked to pay a flat fee for additional access. Print subscribers will be given full access, according to the Wall Street Journal.

"This process of rethinking our business model has also been driven by our desire to achieve additional revenue diversity that will make us less susceptible to the inevitable economic cycles," Janet L. Robinson, president and CEO, The New York Times Company, said in a press release. "We were also guided by the fact that our news and information are being featured in an increasingly broad range of end-user devices and services, and our pricing plans and policies must reflect this vision."

A metered approach means Times content will still be visible online, and thus be able to continue selling a large audience to advertisers, The Times' David Carr wrote today.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-21 01:44

Editor of The Guardian Alan Rusbridger ruled out erecting paywalls around The Guardian's Web site, expressing optimism about the future of the newspaper, Journalism.co.uk reported.

Speaking as part of the Coventry Conversation series, run by the Coventry University journalism department, he said the newspaper had no plans to put up paywalls, as Rupert Murdoch has planned to do for News International titles. "It would be crazy if we were to all jump behind a pay wall and imagine that would solve things," Rusbridger said. He did agree, though, that it was good that journalism was "trying different things."

For more on this story, visit our sister site, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-20 21:04

The New York Times is expected to announce within days that it will charge for access to its online news content. After much in-house debate, the paywall is expected to be along the lines of what the Wall Street Journal uses, as well as a metered system such as the one the Financial Times uses, New York Magazine reported yesterday.

However, the big question isn't whether The Times will charge, but what kind of a paywall it will be.

Felix Salmon wrote in his Reuters blog that:

"The first and most important principle that the NYT must bear in mind is that any smart metering system will work more like a taxicab than like the dreadful FT approach: the key thing is that a meter measures how much of the service you've consumed, and then you pay for that much -- and no more. At the FT, by contrast, the meter slams down a hard paywall after you've reached n pageviews in a given month, and then charges you a very large sum for the n+1th pageview. That's stupid, because no single pageview is worth that much to a reader.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-19 01:00

Syndicate content

© 2014 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation