WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Thu - 27.11.2014


paywalls

Digital subscribers are accounting for an ever-more-generous slice of American newspapers’ circulation pumpkin this Halloween, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulation (ABC)’s latest biannual study of 613 daily newspapers and 528 Sunday titles.

Overall, daily circulation has remained flat in the six months ending September 30, dropping by a mere 0.2 percent compared to the same period last year. But behind this placid mask, digital circulation— encompassing paid and restricted-access websites, mobile apps, PDF replicas and e-reader editions— rose as a proportion of total circulation by over 5 percent. It now accounts for an average of 15.3 percent of newspapers’ total circulation, up from 9.8 percent a year ago.

Leading the digital pack is The New York Times, with a circulation of over 896,000 across its digital platforms (with the data measurement caveat that one user accessing NYT content from multiple digital platforms may be counted more than once). Over half of subscriptions to The Times are now for digital editions.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-31 17:30

If reports in this morning’s Daily Telegraph are accurate, News International’s frosty relationship with Google may be thawing.

After two self-imposed years in the wilderness, quality news titles owned by Rupert Murdoch’s British publishing division could find themselves re-included in Google search results as soon as next month.

The Times and The Sunday Times websites were originally removed from Google’s search index at the same time that paywalls were introduced at the thetimes.co.uk (then timesonline.co.uk), as part of News Int.’s attempts to stop users accessing content for free. Murdoch’s objection to consumers viewing premium content free of charge is no secret, and the media mogul hasn’t pulled any punches in his criticisms of Google’s operating policies.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-26 14:19

"The collective intelligence of the newsroom is something we rarely exploit efficiently," writes Gavin Sheridan, Innovation Director of Storyful in a blog post where he discusses the concept of newsrooms as intelligence agencies.

On the Ebyline BlogSusan Johnston reports on the acceleration of paywalls at US newspapers based on the latest data from the Newspaper Association of America.

The Guardian reports that Twitter has suspended the account of Guy Adams, a journalist for the UK's Independent, who was critical of Olympics coverage by NBC.

"At the Financial Times, we recognized early on that the continued success of our business depended on our ability to adapt to changing reader habits," writes Rob Grimshaw of the FT in an article about "publishing in the age of social media" on The Economist Group's website.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-07-31 17:21

The Chicago Tribune has become one of the latest major newspapers in the US to announce plans to introduce a paywall on its online site, behind which it will place “premium” content including in-depth reports and analysis, columnists and reviews.

At first glance, this may seem little different to action taken by various other news titles that have sought to maintain or increase revenue at a time when print subscriptions are diminishing. However, the Chicago Tribune is attempting to breathe new life into the process by offering its readers the opportunity to read selected articles from Forbes and The Economist as part of its new premium package. The announcement of a partnership between these three titles certainly seems to prove that Bill Adee (vice president for digital development and operations at the Chicago Tribune) and his team understand the need to offer something more than access to their usual articles and reviews in order to justify charging readers for content that was previously free to view online.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-27 16:07

This may be the year where newspapers finally drop the idea of treating all news as a product, and all readers as customers.

One early sign of this shift was the 2010 launch of paywalls for the London Times and Sunday Times. These involved no new strategy; however, the newspaper world was finally willing to regard them as real test of whether general-interest papers could induce a critical mass of readers to pay. (Nope.)

Continue reading on Clay Shirky

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2012-01-06 11:13

by Bobbie Johnson

As the year comes to a close, the media is stuffed with pundits proclaiming that 2011 was the year of something or other. For the most part, it's easy to ignore these trend pieces: Many of them are simply chum thrown in the water to attract readers over a quiet period while giving journalists a chance to take a breather.

Still, there are a few claims that caught my eye. One in particular was Mashable's assertation that 2011 was "the year the paywall worked." More particularly, it argued that the New York Times and the Minneapolis Star-Tribune had set a path for others to follow by making money out of paywalled stories:

Continue reading on Giga OM

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2012-01-04 09:55

Following years of retreat in the face of shrinking readership, mounting financial losses, and a rising chorus of digital visionaries telling them they're doing it all wrong, 2012 will be a year of retrenchment for newspaper publishers.

Still standing some three years after the near-implosion of the newspaper industry in 2008 and 2009, executives will point to their continued existence as proof that their situation was never as bad as it seemed, and that a few tweaks here and there will restore them to pink-cheeked, if downsized, health.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-22 17:33

The concept of paywalls, which publishers continue to agonise over, is a by-product of our digital age. But, writes Ross Sturley, there are some valuable lessons to learn from an earlier wall-building exercise.

Back in the sixteenth century, there was a bit of a hoohah about 'enclosures'. Landowners were building walls around their land to keep the peasants off it. While the land had not been truly free for a long time, the peasants got upset as they felt some right of way or use was being taken away from them.

Continue reading on InPublishing

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-19 09:19

by Sean Carton

Why can't newspapers seem to make any money online?

That's the question I asked myself the other day as I ran smack up against The Baltimore Sun's paywall after having reached my 15 page per month (free) limit. I'm not a big reader of the Sun, but I was curious about what people were saying about Gordon Ramsay's "Kitchen Nightmares" visit to one of our local eateries. I clicked a link on Facebook that was supposed to lead me to a post on the Sun's food blog when I smacked right into the wall.

Continue reading on ClickZ

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-29 09:57

A growing number of newspapers seem to be reaching for the pill labelled "paywall," in the hope that charging readers for news can help solve their revenue headaches: the Minneapolis Star-Tribune has just launched one, as has the Boston Globe, and the PostMedia network in Canada says it is going to roll them out across all of the newspapers in its national chain. Whether newspapers are doing this because the New York Times' paywall makes it look like an attractive idea or because they are growing increasingly desperate isn't clear, but even the NYT's experience shows that a paywall is still a sandbag strategy rather than a growth strategy.

Continue reading on GigaOM

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-02 09:27

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